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Full text of "Cases of neuralgia and of other diseases of the nervous system : preceded by an analytical exposition of them, exemplifying the principles and practice of neuro-dynamic medicine"

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NEURO-DYNAMIO MEDICINE, 

PAKT II. : 

CASES OF NEURALGIA 

AND OF OTHER 

DISEASES OF THE NEHVOUS SYSTEM. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 vyith funding from 

Open Knowledge Commons and Harvard Medical School 



http://www.archive.org/details/casesofneuralgiaOOchap 



CASES OF 

NEURALGIA 



AND OF OTHER 



DISEASES OF THE NEEYOUS SYSTEM 



PRECEDED BT 



AN ANALYTICAL EXPOSITION OF THEM, 



EXEMPLIFYINO 



THE PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE 



KEURO- DYNAMIC MEDICIN"E, 



C^ BY 

JOHN CHAPMAN, M.D., M.E.C.P., M,E.C.S., 

ASSISTANT-PHYSICIAN TO THE METROPOLITAN PEEE HOSPITAL, AND 
PHYSICIAN TO THE FARBINGDON DISPENSARY. 



LONDOi^ : 
J. & A. CHURCHILL, NEW BURLINGTOIsr STREET. 



MDCCCLXXIII. 

\The Rigid of Translation is Reserved.'] 





/l)^ 



LOKDON : 

POINTED BY m'g\>\VAN AND CO. (UMITF.d), 
G1;KAT WIKDliiLL. STRKKT, W. 



^^/y? 




.io 



CO N TENT S. 



SECTION I. 

Introduction: general principles 



PAOK 

vii 



SECTION II. 

the soothing- and agreeable effects of the spinal ice-bag. 

Remedies which are needed are generally agreeable ... ... 1 

The Spinal Ice-bag designed not for the healthy but for the sick ... 3 

And only for such of those whose Maladies can best be treated by 

means of Ice ... .. .. ... ... 3 

In all such cases the Spinal Ice-bag is agreeable ... ... 3 

Evidence that sufferers from Sea-sickness find the Spinal Ice-bag 

agreeable ... ... ... ... ... 3 

Kvidence that sufferers from Diarrhoea find the Spinal Ice-bag agreeable 4 

Evidence that sufferers from Neuralgia find the Spinal Ice-bag agreeable 5 

Evidence that the use of the Spinal Ice-bag makes the patient warm 6 



SECTION III. 

neuro-dynamic medicine exemplified: an analytical exposition 
of its effects. 

Principle according to which the P^eports of Cases constituting 

Section IV. are presented 
Advantages of the Method adopted 
Order of Classification of the Cases 
Cases ExRonplifying the Neuro- Dynamic Treatment of 

Facial Neuralgia 

Cervico-occipital Neuralgia 

Brachial , , 

Intercostal ,, 

Lumbo-abdominal , , 

Hypogastric ,, 

Neuralgia of the Lower Extremities 

General Neuralgia ... 

Painful Excitability of the Spinal Cord 

Backache or Lumbago 

Headache 

Chestache 

Gastralgia 

Enteralgia 

Nephralgia 





... 10 




. 10 




... 11 


it of 






... 11 




... 13 




... 13 




... 13 




... 14 




... 14 




... 14 




... 14 




... 14 




... 15 




... 15 




... 16 




.. 17 


.. 


... 17 




... 17 



CONTENTS. 



Cases Exemplifying the N euro -Dynamic Treatment of 

Neuralgia of the Testicle 

Ovai'ian Neuralgia . . . 

Uterine Neuralgia . . 

Hypersestliesife 

Cerebro-spinal Fever 

Tramps and other Disorders of Voluntary Muscles 

Epilepsy : le grand et le petit mal 

Fainting Fits 

Tinnitus Anrium ... 

Subjective Spectra ... 

Giddiness 

Sleeplessness 

Talking during Sleep 

Tendencies to Insanity 

Impairment of Memory 

Impairment of Sight ... ... 

Numbness, or Impairment of Sensibility ... 

Partial Paralysis ... ... 

Disorders of Local Nutrition (Trophic Phenomena : Swelling and 
Tenderness) ... 

Inequality of the Mammae 

Globus Hystericiis ... 

Shortness of Breath 

Cough ... 

Expectoration 

Nausea and Vomiting 

The Sickness of Pregnancy 

Diarrhoea 

Flatulency 

Constipatioii of the Bowels 

Deficient Menstruation 

Eetarded and Excessive Menstruation 

Retarded and Scanty Menstruation 

Intermi ttent Menstruation 

Leucorrhoea 

Prolapsus Uteri 

I'^xcessively frequent Micturition 

Albuminuria with Anasarca 

Diabetes Mellitus .. 

Coldness of the Extremities ... 

Coldness of the general Surface of the Body 

Tenderness along the Spine 
The Correlations of Different Diseases 



PAG I? 

17 
18 
18 
19 
20 
22 
23 
24 
24 
2.5 
25 
25 
27 
27 
28 
28 
29 
29 

30 
32 
32 
32 
33 
34 
34 
35 
35 
36 
37 
37 
33 
38 
39 
39 
39 
40 
40 
40 
41 
41 
41 
42 



SECTION IV. 



NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF CASES 
ILLUSTRATINa ITS PRINCIPLES AND" PRACTICE. 



INTRODUCTION. 



GENERAL PRINCIPLES. 

The last three Chapters of my work on Neuralgia consist 
almost exclusively of reports of carefully observed facts, proving 
at once the truth of the principles, and the remarkably great 
success of the practice of that system of Medicine which I have 
designated Neuro -Dynamic ; and as it seems to me expedient 
to place that part of the work within reach of those who may 
not wish to read the pathological exposition and discussions 
which occupy a large proportion of its pages, I am induced to 
reprint those chapters as a separate book. 

Those who have read the Chapter on " Treatment," contained 
in that work, or the " Introduction " to my work on " Sea-Sick- 
ness," are so far acquainted with the general principles underlying 
the practice of Neuro-Dynamic Medicine as to be in a position to 
understand and appreciate the reports of cases here given ; those 
who have not read either the one or the other may obtain a 
general idea of the principles in question from the following 
summary statement of them : — 

" 1. That the chief function of the sympathetic nervous system 
consists in regulating the diameters of the blood-vessels through- 
out the body. 

" 2. That when the sympathetic ganglia are in a state of maxi- 
mum hypersemia the nervous efiluence from them to the muscular 
coats of the arteries to which they are severally related, stimu- 
lates them so excessively as to induce in them a condition of 
tonic spasm — a spasm so intense as to result in shutting off the 
blood altogether from a large proportion of the peripheral arteries. 

" 3. That when the sympathetic ganglia are in a state of maxi- 
mum anaemia the nervous effluence from them to the muscular 
coats of the arteries to which they are severally related becomes 
so extremely feeble that a condition resembling paralysis is in- 
duced ; the muscular coats of the arteries become consequently 



Vlll INTRODUCTION. 

extremely relaxed ; and, as the blood flows in the direction of 
least resistance, the parts supplied by the arteries in question 
become suffused with blood to an excessive degree. 

" 4. That when the spinal cord is in a state of hypersemia, 
cramps of the involuntary muscles surrounding the alimentary 
tube as well as cramps, or even convulsions of the voluntary 
muscles, which are due to such hypenemia, are likely to ensue. 

" 5, That every gland and glandular follicle in the body is 
under the control of one motor nerve (which I call the positive 
motor) emerging from the cerebrospinal system, and distributed 
to its secreting cells in order to regulate its functional activity ; 
and of another motor nerve (which I call the neijative motor) 
emerging from the sympathetic system, and distributed to its 
artery or arterial twig, in order to regulate its blood-supply. 

"6. That in the same manner as glands are supplied with 
positive, as well as with negative, motor nerves, so, there is reason 
to believe, every tissue of the body is thus supplied, and is thus 
placed and sustained in a state of elective affinity for the elements 
of the blood requisite for its nourishment and functions. 

"7. That the sj^mpathetic ganglia and the spinal cord can be 
rendered hyperEemic or anremic, artificially, by means of heat, in 
the one case, and cold in the other, applied along the spine. 

" 8. That cold applied along the spine will subdue cramps or 
excessive tension of both voluntary muscles, will lessen sensibility, 
will lessen secretion, and, while increasing within certain limits 
the general circulation and bodily lieat, is capable by prolonged 
use of lessening textural nutrition. 

" 9. That heat applied along the spine will (in some cases) 
induce cramps of both voluntary and involuntary muscles, will 
increase sensibility, will increase secretion, and will lessen the 
general circulation and bodily heat." 

The general pathology and therapeutics consisting in the appli- 
cation of the principles here expressed form the distinctive feature 
of each of my medical works, and are instructively exemplified in 
respect to a considerable variety of diseases by the Cases reported 
in the last Section of this volume. 

London : 25 Somerset Stuket, 

PoRTiiAN Square, Jan, 1873. 



A SERIES OF CAS 

PEECEDED BY 

AN ANALYTICAL EXPOSITION 




SECTION I. 

THE SOOTHING AND AGREEABLE EFFECTS OF THE SPINAL ICE-BAG. 

Were I to adduce all the evidence in my possession tliat ice 
a^pplied along the spine in those cases in which it is therapeutically 
desirable, is agreeable, soothing, and refreshing, I should fill a 
long chapter with this evidence alone. I must, however, confine 
what I have to say on this subject within a very short one. Many 
persons shudder at the bare idea of having a column of ice placed 
along the back, and think that were it continued there for a mode- 
rately short timethe discomfort would be extreme, that its continued 
use would be speedily followed by more injurious results, and, in 
short, that in any case the remedy would be worse than the dis- 
ease. These suppositions, however, are not justified by experience, 
which, in fact, completely contradicts them. 

Indeed, experience proves that in the great majority of cases 
the application of heat along the spine is far more objectionable 
than is the application of cold. In those cases of disease in 
which the use of the Spinal Water-Bag, containing water at, say 
1152 or 120° Fahrenheit., is indicated, the heat feels positively 
pleasant : cases of common catarrh, of hypersemic headache in- 
duced by some temporary cause, of epistaxis, pulmonary conges- 
tion and pulmonary haemorrhage, and cases of dysentery and of 
haemorrhoids are cases of this kind. But, except in such cases, 
heat, even of the moderate degrees just mentioned, when applied 
along the spine feels positively unpleasant, and it may produce 
other objectionable effects besides those of mere discomfort : 
many persons are acquainted with the feeling of sickness induced 
by standing with the back to the fire ; and those of my readers 
who are acquainted with the neuro-pathology of naiisea and 
vomiting, and with their attendant symptoms (first fully explained 
in my Essay on Sea-Sickness) know that the condition of the 
nervous centres out of which those symptoms arise is one which 
may originate a considerable number and variety of disorders. 
In my work on Neuralgia many of these are pointed out. 

The age we live in is pre-eminently an age of restless activity 
and hard work : the severe struggle for mere existence in which 



3 THE SOOTHING AND AGREEABLE 

the millions of so-called " working classes " are engaged ; the 
eager pursuit of wealth which calls forth all the energies of the 
great majority of the middle classes ; the literary, professional, and 
political ambition which constrains its many thousands of votaries 
to toil almost incessantly ; the inordinate personal vanity of every 
class of womankind, which, by inducing the recldess extravagance 
in dress now indulged in, intensifies enormously the labours and 
sacrifices of nearly the whole of one sex and of a large proportion 
of the fathers and husbands of the other ; and, finally, the insa- 
tiable lust of social distinction which impels a large proportion 
of the community into unceasing competition with each other in 
order to attain it, co-operate to render the whole nervous 
system pre-eminently energetic, active, and excitable, and there- 
fore especially liable to become morbidly hypergemic and to 
assume various morbid conditions associated with hypersemia as 
their proximate cause. Such being the case, the reader will 
easily understand how it comes to pass that the great majority of 
diseases are of a kind the Neuro-dynamic treatment of which in- 
volves the use of the sedative power of cold, and that, as already 
said, in the great majority of cases, the application of heat along the 
spine is far more objectionable than is the application of cold. 

In my work on " Neuralgia," at page 289, et seq., I have 
presented a considerable body of evidence, proving that the 
Spinal Ice-bag, when rightly applied, possesses in a remarkable 
degree the power of inducing sleep ; and everyone knows that, 
as a general rule, the operation of causes producing sleep is 
far from unpleasant. I suppose, therefore, that my readers 
will experience no difficulty in recognising that when the 
Spinal Ice-bag produces sleep, the process by which it does so 
must involve the exercise of a soothing and comforting influence. 
Now the delightful sensations induced by any narcotic are propor- 
tionate to the real need of sleep felt by the patient at the time 
he makes use of it, and I venture to affirm in respect to medicines 
generally, that when the medicine given is really needed, when it 
fulfils a want indubitably experienced by the patient, when, in 
fact, its effect is truly medicinal, the patient himself likes the 
taste of it, and feels its immediate influence agreeable. I have 
verified the truth of this observation in respect to acids, alkalies, 
and bitter tonics over and over again. The instincts of sufiering 
organisms, though doubtless often perverted, are, I believe, 
generally reliable, and I am constrained to think that were they 
more carefully heeded and more faithfully followed than they are 
medicines would not excite those feelings of repulsion or disgust 
which they commonly do now, and the art of medicine itself, as 
well as its professors, would cease to be the butt of opprobrious 
jokes, which being as generally and thoroughly relished as they 



EFFECTS OF THE SPINAL ICE-BAa. 3 

are common, in more senses than one, indicate only too truly how 
little faith is inspired even by the medical art of the nineteenth 
century. 

With reference to the sensations produced by the Spinal Ice- 
bag, my readers must bear in mind that it is designed not for the 
healthy but the sick, and only for that portion of the sick in 
whom has become established precisely that morbid condition of 
the circulation of the blood in the nervous centres, which the ap- 
plication of cold is of all agents the most capable of subduing. 
Hence in these cases, and in these only, inasmuch as the Spinal 
Ice-bag subdues a morbid condition in the very citadels of life, 
a condition in which the phenomena of the disease in question 
originate, and inasmuch as the cold restores the circulation of 
the blood in those nervous centres to its normal state without 
contaminating or embarrassing the system with any medicines, it 
seems, a jpriovi, that such physiological changes must inevitably 
be accompanied with sensations of comfort and pleasure, as experi- 
ence proves them to be. In the case of a person who experiences 
sickness or nausea when he sits or stands with his back towards a 
fire, every one can readily understand that no medicine given 
internally to allay the sickness or nausea would be likely to be so 
agreeable, and that no treatment would be likely to be so effective 
as would be a direct reversal of the condition which induced the 
disorder, viz., the application of cold precisely to the part where 
the heat had been previously applied. Now the hypersemia of 
the spinal and sympathetic nervous centres which is the proxi- 
mate cause of the sickness, and which is quickly induced by the 
heat of a domestic fire in the case supposed, is a condition induced 
by solar heat in cases of summer diarrhoea, by motion (which is 
convertible into heat) in cases of sea-siekness, and which produces 
the same effects as those produced by heat, and by various forms 
of nervous irritation and excitement which operate as causes of 
numerous and various diseases. In all such diseases the applica- 
tion of the Spinal Ice-bag must evidently induce feelings as agree- 
able, and results as beneficial as those consequent on its application 
in cases of sickness caused by exposing the back to the fire, and 
precisely for the same reasons ; and that such is really the case I 
will now prove by mentioning a few examples. 

The following evidence is extracted from the reports of the 
Experiments published in my pamphlet on " Sea-Sickness." 

Case 1. — " I don't know," the patient said, "the effects of ice 
on a long-continued voyage, but I believe that the feeling of 
perfect comfort would continue as long as the ice is kept on." 
Case 2 — " She felt the cold to the back peculiarly grateful, but 
wished it more intense ; the bag was therefore placed next the 
skin. This change delighted her." Case 6 — " About twenty 



4: THE SOOTHING AND AGREEABLE 

minutes before reaching Boulogne^, the ice in the bag was so nearly- 
melted as to cause her to feel that the refreshing and sustaining 
influence of the cold was lessening; I therefore placed an additional 
bagful of ice outside her dress, and over the bag already supplied ; 
this sufficed to restore the agreeable sensations she had hitherto 
enjoyed, and to continue them until she landed at Boulogne." 
Case 14. — " He said he felt the cold agreeable and refreshing." 

In my pamphlet of " Cases of Diarrhoea and Cholera"* there 
is the following record : — 

" The application of the Spinal Ice-bag is generally felt to be 
peculiarly comfortable, and in many cases positively pleasant. 
In Case 4, the child's mother says, ' He seemed to like the Ice- 
bag ; he holds his head down to let the bag be put on directly I 
tell him the bag is coming, so I think it must be a comfort to him.' 
In Case 9 the child's mother says, ' She (the child) is well 
contented with the Ice-bag.' In Case 21, the child, who usually 
slept on the Spinal Ice-bag each evening, ' would not go to 
sleep till he had had it : he insisted on having it.' Dr. Moor- 
head, relating his own experience, Case 27, says, ' The Ice- 
bag proved most grateful.' The Director of the Hydropathic 
Establishment at Melrose, who reported Case 28, writes, — 
' One thing has much struck me, viz., the liking that sensitive 
chilly patients have for the cold bag to the spine, although 
frightened to think of it before they make trial.' Dr. Druitt on 
one occasion saw some of my patients with me in order to inform 
himself of the results of my treatment of paralysis and epilepsy. 
After confessing that he was agreeably surprised by those results, 
and stating that ' there was no mistaking the testimony of the 
patients that those results had been most beneficial,' he added, 
' I learned from all the patients that the treatment had made 
them more comfortable — I mean as regards their general feelings 
of health and animal sensations, without reference to the relief of 
particular symptoms.'" 

Generally speaking, patients who use the Spinal Ice-bag are 
greatly surprised to find how agreeable it is when rightly applied 
in suitable cases ; but the feelings which it induces differ con- 
siderably in different persons. One finds it neither agreeable nor 
disagreeable, and, judging from his sensations merely, would not 
know that cold is being aj)plied along his spine at all. Another 
has a more distinct perception of the fact, and finds the cold 
rather agreeable than otherwise. Another says it is very pleasant. 
Another declares it to be wonderfully comforting and delightful ; 

* "Cases of Diarrhoea and Cholera treated successfully through the 
Ageucy of the Nervoiis System chiefly hj means of the Spinal Ice-bag." 
Pp. 32, 33. 



EFFECTS OF THE SPINAL ICE-BAG. 5 

and often still more emphatic epithets are employed by patients 
to express the pleasure which the use of the cold induces. I have 
not, as a rule, recorded their expressions on this point, but in a few 
of the reports given hereafter they will be found mentioned. For 
instance, in Case 10 the patient found no discomfort from the use 
of the ice, but, on the contrary, she found the ice pleasant. 
In Case 29 the patient said, — " The ice is beautiful : I don't 
think I shall ever be able to do without it — it is so comforting." 
Having suffered a long time from want of sleep, in consequence 
of pain, she pronounced, as she thought, the highest eulogium 
on the Spinal Ice-bag when she said, — " The ice makes me long 
to go to sleep in the daytime, but my business prevents me." 
In Case 40 the patient experienced distinct relief while the ice was 
being applied, and foimd it " very agreeable." In Case 56 the 
patient said the ice was " rather pleasant than otherwise." In 
Case 65 the patient said, — " The ice was very comfortable — quite 
refreshing : " and again she said, — " The relief I felt from the ice 
I can't describe," In Case 76 the patient spoke repeatedly of the 
pleasantness of the ice, and having also long suffered from sleepless 
nights, she too was delighted with what she suspected to be its 
sleep-inducing charm. She said, — " I can sleep at any time in 
the daytime now : I fancy the ice draws you to sleep ; I don't 
know whether it is fancy." In Case 80 the patient said, — 
" I find the ice very agreeable : I look for it, and would like to 
have it on longer each time." And again she said, — " I go to 
sleep with the ice on : it's astonishing how pleasant it is." In 
Case 83 the patient found the ice '' very comfortable." In 
Case 95 the patient was much surprised to find that it was 
so agreeable. Having passed five days without using it, he felt, 
he said, the need of it. I asked him what he meant by saying 
he felt "the need of it," and he replied, — "Why, Sir, I feel that 
I like it : I feel that it braces me up." In a case of chronic in- 
flammation of the spinal cord, now under my care, and treated by 
means of the Spinal Ice-bag, the patient exclaimed when it was 
first applied — "Oh, that's delightful!" and each subsequent 
application she has found peculiarly comforting and grateful. 

But, though the evidence just quoted is strikingly contradictory 
of the generally-entertained opinion, that ice applied to the spine 
must be horribly unpleasant, I shall now adduce proofs of a still 
more decisive and conclusive kind that that opinion is erroneous. 
That opinion is founded, of course, on the assumption that the 
Spinal Ice-bag must induce a general feeling of coldness, or even 
cause shivering in the person to whom it is applied. As a matter 
of fact, however, in those cases in which its remedial influence is 
capable of being exerted, or, in other words, when its physiological 
action is needed, it really makes the patient warm. Now, if it 



6 THE SOOTHING AND AGREEABLE 

does, the opinion in question must be erroneous ; and that it does 
so the following authentic statement of facts, the like of which 
may be observed and verified by any physician who will make the 
necessary experiments, proves beyond the possibility of contradic- 
tion. 

The following quotations are from the records of cases given at 
the end of the present volume : — 

Case 1. — Before treatment the patient's hands were generally 
cold, her feet habitually so ; while under treatment " her feet and 
hands became continuously warm." Case 4. — The patient, aged 
sixty, " although warmly clothed, suffered extraordinarily from 
cold. She had always been cold to the touch, she said, even over 
the shoulders and bosom. At the end of the first week of treat- 
ment her feet had become constantly warm — warmer than she had 
ever felt them in her life," and within less than a month from the 
time when she began to use the Spinal Ice-bag she had "become 
wonderfully warm all over." Case 6. — Before treatment the 
patient's feet " were always cold ;" during treatment they became 
quite warm, so that, as her mother said, there was " no longer 
any occasion to put them in hot water." Case 8. — The feet 
w^ere usually cold before treatment began ; during its continuance 
they became " completely and permanently warm." Case 9. — 
Before treatment the feet were " habitually cold ;" within a month 
they had become "continuously warm." Case 10. — The feet which 
had been habitually cold during several years, became quite warm 
under the influence of the Spinal Ice-bag ; but while it was left 
off for a few days, before their warmth had been thoroughly re- 
established, they ceased to be warm. Of course, the re-application 
of the ice restored their natural warmth as before. Case 13. — 
Miss B. suffered from general coldness, but her extremities were 
especially cold — her feet being the coldest. In the course of the 
first seven days of treatment she found that she became quite 
warm all over in about five minutes after applying the Spinal Ice- 
bag ; but that she felt cold again between the applications. At 
a subsequent date she said that after using the bag for half-an- 
hour she became so uncomfortably warm that she could not bear 
it to the end of three-quarters of an hour as prescribed. This 
experience suggests to me to observe that, in some cases, the ex- 
tremities become uncomfortably hot under the influence of the 
Spinal Ice-bag. The lower extremities of one of my patients 
became so hot that I was obliged to lessen the force of the cold by 
wrapping the Ice-bag in flannel. Another patient (a paralytic) 
who, when he came to me, complained, inter alia, of being 
" cold all over," and especially of coldness of the hands and 
feet, even in the hottest weather, reported, after he had been 
under treatment somewhat less than a month, that they had 



EFFECTS OF THE SPINAL ICE-BAG. 7 

become "very hot — very hot." In Case 14, the hands and 
feet which, before treatment, were habitually cold, became per- 
manently warm while the treatment proceeded. In Case 22, 
the patient's extremities, which were habitually cold — the legs 
and feet being excessively so — were rendered completely and 
permanently warm by the Spinal Ice-bag. In Cases 23 and 25, 
the feet, which had been constantly cold, became quite warm ; 
and, in Case 25, the patient's feet became cold again when 
the use of the Spinal Ice-bag was discontinued. In Case 27 
the patient, aged fifty-six, whom I saw for the first time 
January 20, 1868, suffered much from general coldness, and 
had become much more chilly than he used to be. His feet 
were often cold for a couple of hours together after he went 
to bed ; he could hardly sleep for them. Jan. 29, he said : 
" I've become generally warmer, just as I used to feel several 
years ago ; directly I put the ice on my feet became warm, 
warmer than I can get them by the fire." Feb. 13, he said : 
" I continued to keep quite warm while watching* outside Broad- 
wood's premises on a very cold night ; I was very warm all night ;" 
whereas previously, as he assured me, when watching on less cold 
nights, and in just the same clothes, he was very cold. April 1, 
1872, he said : " One very curious thing has happened to me ; I 
used to have very cold feet, I may call them excessively cold, in 
bed ; since I've used the ice I never have a cold foot." 

In Case 28, the feet which had been '' always cold " became 
warm during treatment. Case 29. — The patient suffered from 
excessive coldness of both the knees and feet, which became 
thoroughly warm under the influence of the ice. She said : "If 
you are lying in bed a short time [on the ice] it's wonderful 
how warm your feet get." In Case 30, the patient complained, 
Feb. 26, 1868, that both knees had been extremely cold during, 
at least, the previous twelve months ; and while under treatment, 
he said, March 14th, " I've noticed particularly that the knees 
have become much warmer." Case 31. — Before treatment the 
patient's feet were " always dreadfully cold ; " after she had been 
under treatment about six weeks she said that her feet were de- 
cidedly and continually warmer, and that she was warmer all 
over. She remarked : " I feel myself much warmer with the 
ice on than when it is off." In Case 33, the feet, previously 
cold, were made warm by the ice. In Case 37, there was a 
like result. In Cases 40 and 42, the patients gave similar testi- 
mony. In Case 43, the patient reported that the application 
of the Spinal Ice-bag speedily made her warm aU over. At 
first, fearing that it would make her cold, she sat near the fire 

* During the period when attacks by the "Fenians " were talked of. 



8 THE SOOTHING AND AGREEABLE 

while using it, but soon found it needless to do so, and that hav- 
ing put on the bag when her feet were very cold, they became 
quite warm within half-an-hour. At the end of three weeks from 
the beginning of treatment, she said she continued wonderfully 
warm, and that if she happened to be cold when going out to 
walk, she became warm much more readily than formerly. She 
also reported that having left off the ice for ten days she became 
dreadfully cold again. In Cases 45 and 47, the feet became 
" much warmer " during treatment. In Case 52, the patient 
reported herself especially improved in respect to increase of cir- 
culation, denoted by increased warmth. She said : '' I am natural 
now ; I was not natural before, I was so cold ; the least thing 
makes me warm now." In Case 56, the patient, who had suf- 
fered from coldness of the feet as long as he could remember, 
reported that the Spinal Ice-bag had made his feet " immensely 
warmer." In Case 58, when the patient was first seen, Nov. 20, 
1869, she suffered generally from being cold, and her lower ex- 
tremities, from the knees downwards, were habitually very cold. 
Jan. 18, 1870, her hands and legs were reported to have become 
very warm ; and her mother volunteered the remark that the child 
needed less clothing at night. In Case 59, the jDatient's ex- 
tremities were extremely cold ; "in fact," her mother said, "I 
might say they are never warm : " within a fortnight after treat- 
ment began, she had become notably warmer, and her circulation 
and temperature steadily improved. In Case 60, the patient 
suffered "very much" from coldness of the feet, especially at 
night, but they became quite warm under the influence of the 
ice. Eose G., Case 68, whose hands were cold and clammy, 
who was much troubled with coldness of the feet and general 
chilliness, became generally warm during the first month of 
ti'eatment. In Case 69, the patient's feet were " always cold : " 
she said (Feb. 7, 1871), "I have often been kept awake hours 
with my feet and knees cold." On March 28 she reported, 
" I like the feeling of the ice ; I've not felt cold in bed since I've 
used it." In Case 70, the patient's feet were " almost invari- 
ably cold." After treatment a month she said, "I like the ice ; 
it sends me to sleep." Again, April 18, she reported that her 
feet had become " decidedly warmer ; " and May 8 she said, 
"the increased warmth of my feet continues." Mrs. L., Case 
74, had cold feet "nearly always," and suffered from general 
coldness : her feet became continuously warm, and she soon re- 
covered her normal temperature generally. Louis C, Case 
79, had cold feet habitually : they became thoroughly warm 
during the first week of treatment. In Case 80, the patient, 
who complained that her feet were habitually and excessively 
cold, found that they had become much warmer within seven 



EFFECTS OF THE SPINAL ICE-BAG. » 

days after treatment began. Mrs. A., Case 83, who com- 
plained of coldness of the feet and of a feeling as if cold 
water were poured down her back, was completely relieved of 
both her troubles by the Spinal Ice-bag. Case 86 (Nov. 25, 
1871). — Mrs. P., felt very cold since first attacked with diar- 
rhoea, her feet being " dreadfully cold, like stones." Dec. 2, she 
said, by the time she had had ice on twenty minutes it seemed to 
warm her all over : her feet became warmer than they had been for 
months before. In Case 90, Mrs. J., who had chronic diarrhcea, 
suffered (Dec. 13, 1871) from general coldness: the cheeks and 
extremities were markedly cold, the arms being clammy. Dec. ID, 
her forehead, cheeks, and extremities had become quite warm, and 
all clamminess had gone. She said, " I fancy the ice draws me to 
sleep." Whereas her sleep was formerly much broken, she now 
slept quite soundly, and did not wake till morning. In Case 91, 
the patient, who had extremely cold feet, reported that she expe- 
rienced a decided increase of warmth in them within seven days 
from the beginning of treatment. In Case 95, the patient was 
troubled habitually with extreme coldness of the feet : they 
became thoroughly warm during treatment. Case 96 is espe- 
cially remarkable as an illustration of the power of the Spinal 
Ice-bag to increase the peripheral circulation and, consequently, 
the evolution of animal heat. The patient, aged sixteen, had 
suffered from infancy from a deficiency of circulation, so pro- 
nounced as to have been permanently characterised not only by 
extreme general coldness, but also by blueness of the surface, 
especially of the face and hands ; and he not infrequently had 
severe shivering fits. By the use of the Spinal Ice-bag the whole 
body was made thoroughly warm and the complexion florid. In 
Case 97 the patient, who, after suffering from "faint feelings," 
grew very cold, and whose feet, her mother said, were "like 
icicles," ceased altogether to grow cold generally, and her feet 
became comfortably warm, 



SECTION II. 

NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : AN ANALYTICAL 
EXPOSITION OF ITS EFFECTS. 

In accordance with the principle enunciated and, I hope, 
estahhshed in the work on " Neuralgia " from which these Sec- 
tions are reprinted, that, whatever may be the remote or exciting 
cause of pain in different cases, the immediate or essential 
cause in all cases is one and the same, viz., hypersemia of the 
sensor}^ centre of the affected nerve, I maintain that there are 
no essential or fundamental differences in respect to the nature 
of the pain observable in different cases, however numerous and 
varied may be the aspects in which it presents itself, and there- 
fore that all cases of disease in which pain is an element are, in so 
far as the pain is concerned, as really and truly neuralgic as are 
those in which pain of a kind now generally defined as neuralgia 
is the only notable feature. 

Acting on this conviction, I have included in the collection 
of cases reported in the next Section several which certainly 
would not be termed neuralgic by the authors of the classifi- 
cation of diseases published by authority of the Koyal College 
of Physicians. This plan while being, as I hold it to be, 
pathologically justifiable, possesses, in respect to the general 
object of the work just mentioned, and the principles which 
these cases, when first arranged, were intended to illustrate, some 
special advantages, which induced me to adopt it : Firstly, by 
presenting several examples of the successful treatment of 
ordinary pain, as well as of so-called " true neuralgia," by the 
Neuro-dynamic method I supply a powerful enforcement of the 
doctrine insisted on in that work — of the essential identity of 
neuralgia and ordinary pain ; and, Secondly, while presenting 
a number of cases of various and essentially different diseases in 
which pain is, however, a prominent feature, I am enabled to 
adduce from a variety of sources experimental proofs that that 
system of neuro-dynamic pathology and therapeutics which I 
advocate and practise is true, and that the range of its applica- 
bility to the human organism is co-extensive with that of disease 
itself. Moreover, bearing in mind the uncertainty of life, it seems 
to me desirable that I should now put on record the proofs in ques- 



NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED. 11 

tion ; for if I should be precluded from writing, as I still hope to do, 
a systematic exposition of the principles and practice of Neuro- 
dynamic medicine, the following reports, containing as they do 
an informal exemplification of it, will at least constitute the 
indestructible foundation of a superstructure, the outlines of 
which are already traced, and which, if built up by other hands 
than mine, will assuredly be completed far more speedily than 
it otherwise would have been if that foundation had not already 
been laid. 

The reports are arranged simply in the order of date at which, in 
each case, I first saw the patient. In many of the cases the patient 
presented a considerable assemblage of symptoms, several of which 
are commonly regarded as distinct diseases, and it would be im- 
possible to designate such cases by any name capable of repre- 
senting the several, or even the chief, elements of the malady in 
question. And I venture to remark here, that the more the 
essential nature of disease in general is truly apprehended, or, in 
other words, the more that special diseases located in the various 
parts of the body are regarded as phenomena of disorder in the 
nervous centres, the more the difficulty of classifying cases accord- 
ing to any really scientific method will be recognised : the 
highly differentiated and complex human organism is an indivisible 
unit ; in every part of it the spinal cord, by its countless neural 
ramifications, is virtually present, and every part is represented 
in the " true spinal cord." It seems to me, therefore, that the 
lines of demarcation of any conceivable classification of diseases 
will be inevitably intersected by the all-pervading branches of 
the nervous system, and will thus be more or less completely in- 
validated. In proceeding, as I am now about to do, to present 
an analytical review of the cases reported in the next Section, I 
shall advert to their several symptoms, in an order of succession 
having no claim to a scientific character, but possessing, I think, 
two advantages : it is simple ; and it will probably facilitate the 
reader's apprehension of the lesson which those cases are capable 
of conveying to all who will duly consider them. 

Facial Neuralgia. — The Neuro-dynamic treatment of this dis- 
order is exemplified in the cases numbered respectively 11, 16, IS, 
21, 23, 24, 26, 29, 30, 34, 40, 56, 60, 61, 63, 67, 69, and 82.^ 

Cases 11, 21, 26, 61, and 82, were treated by the application of 
heat (^warm water in the Spinal Water-bag) along the cilio-spinal 
region, and certainly nothing could be more satisfactory than the 
effect produced in Cases 11,21, and 82. In Case 61 I never saw 
the patient, and prescribed only by letter, after being supplied 
with insufficient data for a satisfactory judgment : had the use 
of cold been combined with that of heat the cure would probably 

c 2 



1 2 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : 

have been complete. In Case 11 the action of the heat in sub- 
duing the swelling and tenderness, and in inducing sleep, as well 
as annulling the pain which the patient suffered, is strikingly 
manifest. In Case 82, as in Case 11, there was extreme local 
hyperemia : " during the paroxysms the parts could not only be 
felt, but could be seen to throb." Guided by this symptom, I 
deemed it expedient to treat the case by means of heat rather 
than by cold, in order that by aid of the former a constringing 
force might be exerted on the blood vessels supplying the 
medulla oblongata, and on those of the face at the same time. 
Case 26 affords remarkable evidence of the action of heat applied 
to the cilio-spinal region in lowering the temperature of the 
peripheral part influenced, as well as in subduing the pain : "the 
patient's previously hot and aching forehead became perceptibly 
cool and moist ; " she remarked that " the inside of her mouth 
had become much cooler ; " and " the temperature of her cheeks 
fell so much that they felt cooler than normal." 

Among the cases of facial neuralgia treated by the Spinal Ice- 
bag there is none affording a more wonderful example of its 
remedial efficacy than that presented by Case 29 ; and it is to be 
observed that several of the complicating disorders in this case 
were of a kind which drugs are powerless to remedy. Case 34 is 
a notable instance of extremely rapid action of the Spinal Ice- 
bag in annulling severe pain : the -patient had no neuralgia after 
the first application of tlie hag, on ichich almost every nigld she 
fell fast asleep. And in Case 40 the experience, though not so 
striking, was essentially similar : the patient ''felt distinct relief 
while applying the ice, vhich she felt very agreeable." 

Among the interesting features of Case 56 there is an especially 
instructive one, viz., the apparent " struggle for existence " of the 
pain before it was finally subdued. I say this is " an especially 
instructive feature " because it shows that pain is prone to be- 
come a habit — incarnated in the organism, and that when it does 
so, the use of the Spinal Ice-bag needs to be long persisted in 
before that habit is thoroughly effaced. On one occasion the 
patient, after reporting himself "a great deal better," remarked, — 
" There seems a subdued pain, but as if something was struggling 
with it to keep it down ; " and subsequentlj^, having stated that 
he continued free from pain while continuing to use the Spinal 
Ice-bag, he added, — " but I find that if I don't use it the pain 
comes back : during three days at Christmas I went without ice 
altogether, and the pain became dreadful. I find I can go over 
one day without ice, or two at a push, but I can't extend it to 
three." In a month after making that remark he was able, 
however, to go without ice for three months toge her with im- 
punity ; and soon got wholly rid of his tormentor. 



AN ANALYTICAL EXPOSITION OF ITS EFrECTS. 13 

Gervico-Occipital Neuralgia is more or less distinctly mani- 
fested in Cases 4, 30, 31, 40, and 69 ; but in each of them it was 
part of a more general neuralgic habit, and was subdued by means 
of the Spinal Ice-bag along with the more general affection. 
Case 31 is an interesting example of intense pain, associated 
with, and probably caused by powerful and persistent clonic 
contractions of the trapesius and complexus muscles of the right 
side. Drugs had long been tried without any avail to stop the 
malady, and I doubt if any other agent than ice could have 
exerted a curative power over it. 

Brachial Neuralgia. — l^he cases numbered respectively 20, 24, 
25, 27, 28, 29, 40, 76, 80, 94, and 98 afford examples of neuralgia 
of some part, or of the whole of the upper extremity. Of these 
cases, Nos. 27, 28, 29, 40, 76, and 80 are the most remarkable, 
in respect to severity, extent of range, long continuance and 
complications, and present, therefore, the most striking proofs of 
the ef&cacy of the JN euro-dynamic method of treatment. 

Intercostal Neuralgia is exemplified in the cases numbered 
1, 5, 20, 25, 30, 37, 39, 40, 47, 49, 50, 51, 54, 58, 64, 66, 91, 
and 97. That form of this disorder, which consists in neuralgia 
of the female breast, appeared in Cases 1, 5, 40, and 64. Mam- 
mary neuralgia often proves persistently rebellious to ordinary 
treatment ; but it will be seen that in Case 1 the pain, which had 
lasted several years, was quickly and permanently subdued by the 
Neuro-dynamic method, and that in the other cases of the disorder, 
which, however, was comparatively slight, the cure was equally 
complete. Infra-mammary neuralgia occurs in nearly half of 
the whole of these cases of intercostal neuralgia, viz., in those 
numbered 37, 39, 47, 50, 51, 54, 91, and 96. As Dr. Anstie 
rightly observes, pain beneath the left breast " is one of the 
commonest of all neuralgic affections ; " but I am obliged to 
dissent from his remark, that women with neuralgic tendencies so' 
often experience this pain "chiefly in consequence of over-suckling, 
but also from exhaustion caused by menorrhagia or leucorrhoea, 
and especially from the concurrence of one of the latter affections 
with excessive lactation" (p. 39). The whole tenour of the 
pathological exposition already given in my work on " Neu- 
ralgia " is opposed to this idea of the causation of tlie malady ; 
and I need merely remark here, as I have thoroughly proved, 
that pain beneath the left breast and leucorrhoea are twin results 
of one common cause — hyperaemia of the spinal cord : in the one 
case certain of its sensory, in the other certain of its secretory 
cells being a seat of the disorder. The question — what, in the 
majority of cases, is the exciting cause of inlra-mammary neu- 
ralgia ? is a very interesting one, and one which, so far as I knovi', 
has never received a satisfactory answer. I adverted to the 



14 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : 

subject at page 62 of the work just mentioned, but since doing 
so it has seemed to me probable that irregularities and tumultuous 
disorders of the circulation of the blood in the spleen constitute 
the exciting cause of this pain. As a distinctive malady it occurs 
exclusively in women in whom the nervous and vascular system 
are more mobile, more easily disturbed, and more liable to distur- 
bance than they are in men ; moreover it occurs chiefly in those 
women in whom the nervous system is peculiarly susceptible and 
excitable. If so, this orgau in such women is the seat of great 
and rapid alternations of circulation, and, being often both 
quickly enlarged and again contracted in correspondence with the 
changes occurring in the general peripheral circulation, it can 
scarcely fail to exert an exciting influence on the nervous centres 
more or less immediately related to it, and thus to induce, by 
reflex action, paiu in its own or in neighbouring regions, 

Lumho-ahdominal Neuralgia is represented in Cases 10 and 62. 
Both cases are remarkable by their complications, and No. 10 by 
the extreme severity and long duration of the pain. Considered 
in respect to the seat of pain, they are rightly called cases of 
lumbo-abdominal neuralgia ; but I incline to think that in each 
case the right ovary was one of the chief foci of disorder. 

Hypogastric Neuralgia. — Case 68 exemplifies this disorder in a 
slight degree ; in Case 89 the malady was extremely severe, and 
liad recurred very frequently ; the patient had been liable to it 
during her whole life, and, nevertheless, was completely cured. 

Neuralgia of the Lower Extremities occurred in Cases 5, 17, 25, 
27, 29, 30, 38, 46, 75, 79, 83, and 91. Cases 16, 30, 38, 40, and 
79 were well marked examples of that form of neuralgia generally 
described as sciatica ; in Cases 5 and 83 (the latter that of a 
pregnant woman) the crural nerves were especially affected ; in 
Cases 25, 27, and 46 the feet were the chief seats of pain — 
Cases 27 and 46 were especially severe, and Case 46 presented 
some remarkable features deserving especial notice. 

General Neuralgia. — In some persons the neuralgic tendency 
is so pronounced that there is scarcely any part of the body but 
what becomes in turn a seat of suffering : Cases 12, 25, 29, and 
91 are of this kind. The two last cases, in the first of which a 
complete cure was effected, are deserving of especial attention. 

Painful Excitahility of the Spinal Cord is exemplified in Cases 
43, 60, 69, and 84. Indeed, the difference between this affection 
and that called general neuralgia is little more than one of degree : 
the former involves a greater amount of the spinal cord than 
does the latter, and therefore the phenomena are both more ex- 
tensive and more various than are those of general neuralgia. 
The chief characteristics of painful excitability of the spinal cord, 
or "spinal irritation," as it is commonly called, are excessive 



AN ANALYTICAL EXPOSITION OF ITS EFFECTS, 15 

tenderness and liability to pain of the whole spine, associated 
with an extraordinary proneness not only to neuralgia, but also 
to the development of morbid phenomena of the voluntary and 
involuntary muscles, of the glandular system, and of textural 
nutrition. 

Back-ache, or Lmnhago, is one of the most common of the pain- 
ful affections from which human beings suffer, and one which 
drugs are almost powerless to relieve. Aching along some part 
of the spine often accompanies each of the numerous forms of 
neuralgia ; and the most common kind of back-ache — that located 
in the lumbar, and in the lower dorsal segments, is almost always 
associated with disorders of the female pelvic viscera. Indeed, 
this affection is so common, and so rebellious to ordinary medical 
treatment, that, as a general rule, women submit to it as an in- 
scrutable and inevitable " dispensation of Providence " which it 
behoves them to bear in silence. But, just as the magic potency 
of chloroform is dispersing the superstition that the pains of 
childbirth are among the unavoidable effects of the " primseval 
curse," so the power of ice will annul the belief that the pains in 
question, which indeed are also mainly connected with disorders 
of the reproductive organs, defy the power of medical art. In 
fact, they form a part of that group of maladies which are now 
most curable. The truth of this statement is rendered indubit- 
able by the experience recorded in the reports of the cases 
numbered 1, 5, 15, 23, 25, 42, 43, 45, 47, 51, 52, 53, 54, 60, 62, 
64, 65, 71, and 91. 

Headache was experienced in Cases 1, 3, 5, 7, 13, 15, 20, 21, 

23, 24, 25, 28, 29, 31, 33, 35, 36, 39, 42, 44, 45, 47, 49, 50, 
54, 57, 60, 62, 63, 64, 65, QQ, 68, 69, 80, 96, and 98. It thus 
appears that of the following cases — 100 in all — 37 were cases in 
which headache was a more or less prominent symptom. In 36 
of these cases the headache was completely cured ; and even in . 
the remaining one, namely. Case 69, decided improvement was 
experienced. The cure of such a proportion of such cases is a 
result the achievement of which would have been impossible except 
by the Neuro-dynamic method. I say "of such cases," be- 
cause many of them had been of long duration, many of them 
were extremely severe, and many of them presented both these 
features. In Case 1 the patient had suffered " almost con- 
stantly ; " in Case 3, the patient " had headache all day every 
day ; " in Case 5, headache " lasted nearly half the day about 
four days out of seven ; " in Case 7, " terrible headaches nearly 
every day and nearly all day long " were complained of ; in Case 

24, the patient " was a great and habitual sufferer from headache, 
from which she was scarcely ever free ; " in Case 25, headache 
" came on each morning ; " in Case 28, " great pain in the head, 



16 . NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : 

with frequent giddiness " had been suffered "almost everyday 
for some hours upwards of a month, and both the pain and the 
giddiness were increasing ; " in Case 29, the patient had long 
been a sufferer from " acute throbbing headache ; " in Case 31, 
there was "severe and persistent headache;" in Case 42, the 
patient suffered from " very severe headache, continuing all 
day two or three days a week, and was very giddy ; " in Case 50, 
the patient's chief trouble was headache " almost daily." In 
Case 54, the patient had been subject to headache " as long as 
she could remember : it recurred generally every day." In Case 
57 the patient " liad suffered during five years from attacks of 
extreme headache, which came on several times a week, which 
generally lasted ten or twelve hours, and which almost incapaci- 
tated the patient from doing anything ; " in Case 60, there was 
excessive pain at the back and base of the brain, and also this re- 
markable feature, viz., that when absent, the pain was induced not 
only by any ordinary noise, but even by the laughing or singing 
of the patient herself; in Case 63, the patient had suffered chiefly 
at night from " horribly severe " and increasing pain in the head 
during five or six months ; in Case 64, the patient, who often felt 
giddy, said, '^ I suffer to stupefaction in the back part of my 
head ; " in Case 66, the patient " suffered every day from a sense 
of pressure and great pain at the top of the head ; in Case 80, 
the patient suffered from " an almost constant and peculiar head- 
ache, a feeling as if her head would burst ; " in Case 96, the boy 
had suffered very frequently from pain across the back and base 
of his head for several years, in fact, as long as he could re- 
member ; and finally, in Case 96, the patient had had very severe 
frontal headache about four times a vveek during many months. 
Chest-ache. — Cases 47 and 49 are examples of this common 
affection which, as in these two cases, is often associated causa- 
tively with suppression or insufficiency of the menstrual function, 
and which, as I have said at page 72, is not infrequently the 
initial stage of phthisis. In Case 47, the pain in the chest was 
accompanied, as it frequently is in such cases, by pain along the 
upper part of the dorsal spine ; and the menses had been sup- 
pressed during four months. In this case the suppression was, 
doubtless, the cause of the chest-ache ; but in Case 49, the chest- 
ache, though occurring in a woman whose menses had been so 
scanty during the preceding five months that they were " only a 
mere show," was not due, I apprehend, to the menstrual defi- 
ciency, but to a general disorder of the nervous system, of which 
that deficiency and the chest-ache, as well as the head-ache, 
retching, vomiting, constipation of the bowels, and coldness of 
the feet were a common expression. As will be seen by reference 
to each of these cases, not only the chest-ache, but all the ac- 



AN ANALYTICAL EXPOSITION OF ITS EFFECTS. 17 

companying maladies, vanished when, by the Neuro-dynamic 
method, their immediate cause, the morbid state of the spinal 
and sympathetic nervous centres, was removed. 

Gastralgia. — Cases 88, 93, 95, and 96 exemplify this disorder 
in very striking forms, and probably none of the hundred cases 
here given demonstrate more impressively than these do the won- 
derful power of the Spinal Ice-bag as a remedial agent. In 
Case 88, the patient had been suffering with terrible frequency 
during two months from dull, heavy, gnawing, deep-seated pain 
in the stomach, followed by vomiting, and had been liable all his 
life to this malady, which had often completely disabled him ; in 
Case 93, the patient had been afflicted in a similar manner every 
day during six months ; in Case 95, attacks of pain and vomiting, 
lasting generally from six to eight hours, occurred at intervals, 
varying in length from a day to a week, during upwards of two 
years ; in Case 96, the patient's paroxysms of " agony in the 
stomach," as his mother called them, lasted several hours each 
time, recurred not less and often more frequently than once a 
week, had continued many years, and were becoming increasingly 
severe. Nevertheless, in each of these terrible cases, after medi- 
cal art as ordinarily practised had proved of no avail, a complete 
cure was effected by the Neuro-dynamic method. 

Enteralgia. — Severe forms of this malady are presented in 
Cases 86, 87, 88, and- 90. In Cases 86 and 90 the pain was asso- 
ciated with diarrhoea, and had continued in the latter case about 
a month, in the former upwards of three months. In Case 87 
the pain was accompanied by vomiting and constipation, and had 
continued about a year ; and in Case 89, the patient, who was 
aged sixteen when she was brought to me, had suffered severely 
in the manner described " almost from her birth." In each case 
the pain, as well as tlie other symptoms complained of, was com- 
pletely and permanently abolished. 

Ne'pliralgia. — The affection generally designated nephralgia, 
viz., the very severe pain incident to the passage of renal calculi 
from the kidneys into the bladder, is exemplified in Case 81a. 
In this case the agonizing pain was wonderfully subdued by the 
Spinal Ice-bag. Case 92 shows how rapidly pain in the kidneys 
themselves may be subdued by the application of ice. In this 
case the pain was, I apprehend, a consequence of nephritis. 

Neuralgia of the Testicle. — In Case 70 the pain had been in- 
duced about two years before I saw the patient by lifting a heavy 
weight ; in Case 81, it seemed to have originated spontaneously 
in an otherwise " nervous " patient ; but in both cases the disease 
was thoroughly and permanently annulled in one and the same 
way — the exertion of a sedative influence over the dorso-lumbar 
segments of the spinal cord. 



18 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : 

OvaHan Neuralgia is presented in Cases 1, 42, and 64, possibly 
also in Cases 10 and 62, which have already been referred to 
under the name of " lumbo-abdominal neuralgia." In Case 1, 
the pain had been of long continuance, and " was increasingly 
acute immediately before the recurrence of the menses." In 
Case 42, the pain, which was in the left ovary, was brought on 
at any time by walking, and in this respect exhibited an interest- 
ing likeness to the cases of neuralgia of the testicle already men- 
tioned. In Case 64, the patient had suffered from neuralgia of 
the left ovary during eight months. It is worthy of notice that 
both in this case and in Case 1 there was mammary as well as 
ovarian neuralgia ; in Case 1 the left ovary and right mamma 
were the seats of pain ; but in Case 64, the pain both of the 
ovary and of the mamma was on the same side. Considering the 
intimate functional relationship between the mammae and ovaria, 
we easily understand how likely they are to become morbidly 
affected simultaneously. I have only to add that in each of 
these cases the ovarian neuralgia was completely cured by the 
Neuro-dynamic treatment. 

Uterine neuralgia. — The cases of this disorder are extremely 
numerous, and are numbered respectively — 1, 3, 6, 7, 9, 13, 22, 
25, 29, 54, 58, 59, 60, 64, 66, 69, 80, 97. In Case 1, the menses 
were accompanied by "fearful cutting pain;" in Case 3, there 
was a " dragging pain " in the pelvis, and " a sort of cutting pain 
in the womb ; " in Case 6, the patient suffered extremely during 
at least two days immediately before, and during the whole of 
each menstrual period — her mother said, " she is doubled up with 
pain ; " in Case 7, the patient suff'ered intense uterine pain " of a 
cutting or griping kind," together with back-ache before and 
during the whole of her menstrual periods : she could not stand, 
she said, because the pain was so dreadful ; in Case 9, " pinch- 
ing, drawing pain " was experienced during the whole period of 
menstruation, and generally during one or two days previously. 
In Case 13, the pain came on with such terrific severity that she 
was obliged, she said, " to dance about the room." This " agony " 
usually lasted about five hours, and subsided temporarily when 
the flow began, but soon recurred, though with less intensity, the 
flow stopping meanwhile ; in this manner the pain and flow 
alternated with each other during about five days. In Case 22, 
the patient suffered extreme dysmenorrhceal pain during the whole 
period of menstruation ; in Case 25, the menses stopped in the 
day time, and meanwhile there was great pain in the womb and 
at the bottom of the back ; in Case 29, menstruation was " ex- 
cessively painful ; " in Case 54, the patient, aged twenty, had 
always suff'ered since she was thirteen years old from dysmenorrhcea 
with great pain ; in Case 59, the patient " suffered fearfully : 



AN ANALYTICAL EXPOSITION OF ITS EFFECTS. 19 

throughout the first day she was in one continuous agony, which 
kept her — to use her mother's expressive phrase — ' rolled up in a 
ball,' The second and third days she suffered less, and could 
move about. Her mother said, ' the pain is so severe, that though 
she is not given to crying, she is constrained to cry.' " In Case 
60, the catamenia were preluded during about a week by pain in 
the womb ; in Case 64, there was extremely severe menstrual pain, 
lasting about forty-eight hours ; in Case 66, the patient had great 
pain in the womb at her periods, and had suffered thus during 
many years ; in Case 68, the patient suffered intense pain at her 
periods ; in Case 69, the patient had excessively severe pain in 
the womb at her periods, lasting two or three days ; in Case 80, 
great pain in the back, womb, and thighs, " in fact, all round," 
was experienced during two or three days at each period ; in 
Case 97, the patient had intense pain in the lumbar and hypo- 
gastric regions during the whole of the first day of her menstrual 
periods, when she generally felt sick and often vomited. 

Of these cases, 18 in number, there were 14 in which the 
uterine neuralgia was thoroughly cured, and in the 4 remain- 
ing cases a remarkable improvement was effected ; indeed, 
had the treatment been persisted in, they also would probably 
have been cured. But be this as it may, everyone acquainted 
with the disease in question knows that the cure of 14 out of 18 
cases of it, and a decided amelioration of the remainder, is an 
achievement without parallel in the history of medicine. And 
all who reflect how terribly prevalent uterine neuralgia is, and 
how powerless drugs are to relieve it, will be of opinion, I believe, 
that if Neuro-dynamic Medicine were available for the cure of this 
disease only, its introduction would be a priceless blessing to 
humanity. 

Hyper CBstJiesice. — Six peculiarly interesting and instructive 
examples of these affections will be found among the following 
cases, viz., those numbered respectively 65, 65a, 70a, 70b, 73, and 
94. The third and fourth were cases of small-pox. The rapidity 
with which the previously intolerable itching of the pustules 
subsided while the Spinal Ice-bag was being applied was scarcely 
less wonderful than it was delightful to the patients. Cases &b 
and 65a represent the development and treatment in the same 
patient on two successive occasions of a kind of erythema nodosa, 
the irritation of which was extreme. On the occurrence of this 
affection the second time. Dr. Liveing, who is devoting special 
attention to skin diseases, was kind enough, at my request, to 
watch the case with me. The speed and completeness with which 
the disorder was put an end to was only less satisfactory than was 
the stoppage of the irritation in the cases of small-pox, because 
the disorder was less important. Case 73 interested me in a most 



20 NEURO-DYNAMIO MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : 

especial manner : it was a very remarkable instance of the pro- 
duction of a peripheral disorder by reflex influence from the 
nervous centre implicated, after the exciting cause — a wound in 
the wrist— had completely healed ; but to me it was still more 
remarkable on account of the peculiar condition induced in the 
surface of the palms of the hands — a condition which before I 
had neither seen nor read of That condition, consisting of a 
peculiar smoothness, glossiness, redness, and burning irritation of 
the surface, I assured myself on the first examination to be wholly 
of nervous origin, and to have been produced as a sequela of an 
accident consisting of the cutting the wrist by the broken glass. 
Some months afterwards, when in the library of the College of 
Surgeons, I got hold of an exceedingly instructive and interesting 
book which I had long wished to see, but which, being out of 
print, I had not obtained, viz., the work of Messrs. Mitchell, 
Morehouse, and Keen, recording their observations during the 
recent American War, and entitled, " Gunshot Wounds and other 
Injuries to the Nervous System," and was surprised and delighted 
to find my diagnosis thoroughly confirmed by the experience of 
those careful observers, who have recorded many cases in which 
injuries of nerves by gunshot wounds produced a precisely similar 
phenomenon. If, happily, those authors had known of the 
wonderful efficacy of the Spinal Ice-bag in such cases the un- 
fortunate soldiers who suffered in the particular manner in ques- 
tion might have been saved from their misery.* In Case 94 
the irritation was accompanied by an eruption different from the 
others just mentioned, but it was also abolished with astonishing 
rapidity. Indeed, it seems from these experiences as if cutaneous 
irritation generally may be allayed by one and the same method 
of exciting the sedative influence of cold over the spinal cord. 

Cerebrospinal Fever is exemplified in a very pronounced form 
in Case 14, and, as it seems to me, quite distinctly in Cases 35 
and 36. In a series of papers published in the 3Iedical Press 
and Circidar when this grave malady was prevalent in Dublin, I 
expressed myself fully concerning its pathology and treatment, 
and gave reasons for believing that the most successful treatment 
of it would consist in the prolonged application of ice across the 
occiput and along the spine. Case 14, which I had already treated 
in that way, gave an encouraging assurance that my expectation 

* Dr. Austie points out (p. 17) "that these skin lesions correspond very 
nearly, not only to those observed in the cases of nerve injury reported by 
Mr. Paget, in which, actually, neuralgia was present (though the kind of 
pain is not exactly specified), but also very nearly with the nutritive changes 
observed by Mr. Jonathan Hutchinson in a number of cases of surgical 
injuries of nerves." 



AN ANALYTICAL EXPOSITION OF ITS EFFECTS. 21 

was well founded, and this assurance was greatly strengthened by- 
Professor Morgan's experience in a case reported by him in the 
Medical Press and Circular for Sept. 11, 1867. That case is at 
once so remarkable, so confirmatory of the views expressed in the 
papers just mentioned, and presents from an independent and 
impartial witness evidence so indisputable of the action of the 
Spinal Ice-bag, not only on the nervous centres, but through 
them on the peripheral circulation, that I am tempted to quote 
Professor Morgan's report of the case here in his own words. 

"The following case I conceive of interest, as it tends to show the value 
of the Spinal Ice-bag of Dr. Chapman in the treatment of cerebro-spinal 
inflammation .: — 

"A lithe and, hitherto, active boy, set. nine, was admitted at 4.30 a.m., 
Aug. 27th, 1867, to Mercer's Hospital. His parents state that he was a 
little ailing the evening previous on going to bed, and shortly after became 
restless and rambling, picking at the clothes, and in fits as they describe. 
The symptoms so increased in intensity that early in the morning he was 
brought to hospital. The raving was now incessant, but he was capable of 
obeying when repeatedly desired, putting out the tongue rapidly, and with 
a jerk of the muscles ; face rather flushed ; head retracted ; sterno-mastoid 
muscles tense ; no dysphagia ; muscles of trunk and extremities moderately 
rigid, but becoming more so on slight pressure, though not by pressure over 
spine ; surface warm ; and on examination a curious blush was distinct over 
the lower half of body, having the appearance of a capillary excitement of 
the skin, and not of a rash. Pupils enormously dilated, and quite insen- 
sible ; there was one attempt at vomiting ; belly slightly tumid ; pulse, 120 ; 
tongue clean and moist. An Ice-bag not being at hand, cold effusion was 
used over the head and occiput, with rather tranquilising effect ; turpentine 
with fcBtid tincture administered ; and hydrarg. c. creta, gr. ij. ; pulv. 
jalapa, c, gr. xij., every two hours ; turpentine stupe to the belly. 

^"■Eleven o'clock. — ^There is now more distinct tendency to spasmodic 
action of the muscles of a tonic nature, the pupils being observed distinctly 
to dilate more at the approach of a spasm ; three suspicious purpuric spots 
on one, and two on the other arm are now seen ; a large-sized Ice-bag was 
now charged with ice and salt, and applied along the spine from occiput to 
lumbar region ; the immediate effect was contraction of the pupils, though 
not to their normal size ; diminution of the spasm and restlessness, and,, 
what was remarkable, of the blush over lower limbs ; belly is rather tumid ; 
Ice-bag to be refilled at two hours' interval. 

"Evening visit. — Tension of muscles rather less ; pulse 108 ; blush of lower 
limbs disappeared ; bowels but once freed ; ordered olei crotonis gtt. ss., 
calomel gr. iv., continue Ice-bag at two hours' interval. 

*• August 2%th.,nine a.m. — Slept none ; delirium and restlessness constant ; 
the arms at times rigidly stretched out ; twitchings of muscles of face, 
which is now rather pale ; pulse 100, weaker ; tongue moist ; pupils still 
dilated ; muscles not so tense, and certainly relieved on each refilling of the 
Ice-bag ; the belly still rather tumid, bowels once moved ; calomel and 
croton oil to be repeated, and followed hy sulphatis quinse, gr. v., every 
three hours ; iced beef-tea to be freely given ; continue the Ice-bag without 
intermission. 

" Evening visit. — Rigidity of muscles yielding ; pupils slightly contracting, 
can obey directions ; bowels once moved ; slept once in the afternoon ; 
pulse 100 ; tongue clean ; herpes of upper lip now appearing ; continue the 
quinine and beef-tea and Ice-bag at three hours' interval. 



22 NEUEO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : 

"Half-past nine a.vi., August l^th. — Decidedly better; consciousness 
returning ; pupils contracting ; can recognise faces aud answer questions ; 
rigidity relaxing ; can bend the head forward so as to touch chest with 
chin ; has slept live hours ; herpes about the size of threepenny piece. To 
continue quinine and beef-tea, which latter he takes freely ; the Ice-bag 
continued at four hours' interval. 

^^ Evening visit, August 2Wi. — Improvement so manifest that the Ice-bag 
is dispensed with. Quinine and beef -tea continued for the present. 

" September lst.—Tlh.Q boy is allowed home, and to attend the dispensary. 
The service of the Ice-bag in this case was a diminution of the excitement 
and delirium, and the effect on the pupils was very remarkable, the contrac- 
tion occurring within a few minutes after its application. It might be sup- 
posed that the continued application of so large a bag of ice would have 
caused some local mischief, but such did not appear ; allowance was made 
for some difficulty in keeping the bag applied, owing to the patient's con- 
dition."* 

At the close of his report Professor Morgan gives an account 
of ''the conditions under which the attack came on " in six cases 
which came under his care : of these six cases, the only one which 
did not prove fatal was the only one which was treated by means 
of the Spinal Ice-bag ; and he observes, — " This one has been 
saved, as I believe, by the use of the Ice-bag, in combination 
with the free exhibition of quinine and support." 

Cramps and other Disorders of Voluntary Muscles. — That very 
common and very painful affection, cramp of the muscles of the 
lower extremities, is, so far as I am aware, incurable by any 
known drug ; but whether it be of that kind which attacks 
otherwise healthy persons, and which comes on only at night — 
not seldom as an habitual visitant, or whether it occurs only as 
an accompaniment of other diseases, severe diarrhoea, for ex- 
ample, it is easily and completely subdued by the Spinal Ice-bag. 
Cases 4, 5, and 40 are good examples of the former, and Case 96 
of the latter. I may add here that the " Cases of JDiarrhoea and 
Cholera " which I have published present a considerable body of 
evidence to the same effect. Moreover, and the fact is of capital 
importance, cramps are not only subdued by this method of treat- 
ment, but their tendency to recur is abolished : in numerous cases 
which have come utider my observation, persons who have suffered 
for years from cramps coming on in the night have been com- 
pletely and permanently relieved from them by means of ice ; 
indeed, Cases 4 and 96 confirm the truth of this remark. 

Spasmodic contraction of voluntary muscles of that gradual 
and gentle kind which does not amount to cramp producing 
severe pain, but which disables the patient, is exemplified in 

* "The Spinal Ice-bag in Cerebro-spinal Inflammation." By John 
Morgan, F.R. C.S.I. , Professor of Descriptive Anatomy to the Eoyal 
CoUege of Surgeons of Ireland. Medical Press and Circular, September 11, 
1867. 



AN ANALYTICAL EXPOSITION OF ITS EFFECTS. 23 

Case 5. Two other cases of this kind, but in which the disorder 
was more pronounced, have come before me : in one of these 
cases the patient was a sempstress, who, owing to the involuntary 
and tonic contractions of the flexor muscles of both hands, was 
incapable of continuing her work ; in the other the patient, who 
is an eminent pianist, was affected in like manner, and so severely 
that he was disabled from playing ; and in both these cases, as in 
Case 5 just referred to, a rapid and permanent cure was effected. 

Another form of muscular contractions is that exemplified in 
Cases 4 and 32, viz., that of clonic but continuously recurring 
spasms ; in the one case the muscles of the lower jaw were 
affected, in the other, in which there was great suffering, those of 
the neck were the seat of the disease. In this last case the patient 
had been, during a considerable time, under the care of one of 
the most eminent neuro-pathologists in London without deriving 
any substantial benefit. 

There is still another and a very distressing kind of involuntary 
contraction of voluntary muscles, v/hich, indeed, is on the border- 
land of epilepsy, and which may be referred to here because 
it is exemplified in Cases 7 and 12. I mean those violent jerks 
or starts with which some patients are troubled, and which in 
some cases, as in Case 7, are so violent as to throw the patient 
down. 

In each of these cases a cure was effected by the Neuro-dynamic 
method. 

Epilepsy : le grand et le petit mat — As I have had considerable 
experience of the remarkable efficacy of the Neuro-dynamic method 
in the treatment of epilepsy, I intend to publish a separate treatise 
on the subject ; meanwhile, as the disease appears in Cases 1, 6, 
7, 9, and 96, especial attention is invited to those cases. Case 6 
was one of very severe epilepsy {le grand mal), which had con- 
tinued from childhood, and which manifested itself most terribly 
at the patient's catamenial periods. She was under treatment 
only four months ; nevertheless, the fits gradually became less in 
number, much shorter, and less severe, and at her third catamenial 
period after the treatment began the patient, for the first time in 
her life, menstruated without having a single fit. In Case 9 the 
patient had attacks of le grand mal, generally about three fits a 
month, and always at her catamenial periods. Wliile under 
treatment she menstruated on three successive occasions without 
having a fit — a fact surely very significant and important, although 
she was not cured of her malady. In Case 96, which was one of 
extremely severe petit mal — the attacks being not only frequent, 
but more prolonged than in any other case of petit mal I ever 
met with — the improvement effected was so great and striking, 
and was accomplished in so short a time, as to justify the convic- 



24 NEURO -DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : 

tion that the patient would have been completely cured if only 
his poor, struggling parents could have borne the expense of the 
ice two or three months longer. In Case 1 of petit vial occurring 
every day, and in Case 7 of both itetit et grand mal — a very 
severe case — a complete cure was effected. 

Fainting Fits, or cases of anaemia (more correctly liypoemia) 
of the brain resulting in loss of consciousness more or less com- 
plete, are, in respect to their essential nature, nearly akin to 
epilepsy ; nevertheless, there is a difference which justifies the 
distinctive name by which they are commonly designated. In 
the case of severe brachial neuralgia numbered 76, fainting fits 
were a prominent complication, and were generally induced by 
, the agouising pain which the patient suffered. She began to be 
afflicted with them between two and three years before she first 
consulted me; and since they first came on they had usually 
recurred several times a week, but occasionally two or three times 
a day. My treatment of her began May 25th, and was continued 
uninterruptedly until June 16th, when it ceased because she was 
" unable to get ice," and was not resumed until June 22nd. 
During the continuance of the treatment she was quite free from 
fits ; but June 18, while she was without ice, " she became very 
ill and fainted away with pain;" and, again, June 21st, "she 
fainted twice from the same cause, and lost her consciousness 
completely." On June 23rd the treatment was recommenced, 
and since that date the patient has never had a fit. I may add 
that I have bean consulted in several cases of fainting fits, and 
that the Neuro-dynamic treatment of them has been attended 
with one uniform result, — ^their rapid and complete abolition. 
In respect to this malady Dr. Wm. Playfair has verified my ex- 
perience, and has kindly given me the report of a case in which 
he also effected a cure by the use of the Spinal Ice-bag. In a 
recent case of this kind to which I was called (April 26th, 1872) 
in consultation with the ordinary medical attendant of the 
patient, she was then having frequent and prolonged fits almost 
daily ; but from the day the treatment which I advised was 
begun until June 10th, when I last saw her, she had not had a 
single fit, and was wonderfully improved in several other impor- 
tant respects. 

Tinnitus cmrmm {singing in the ears). — This obscure affection, 
which occurred in Case 1, and which was a constant trouble to 
the patient, was completely cured along with the other disorders, 
including le petit mal, from which she suffered. In several other 
cases a cure has been effected by the Neuro-dynamic method ; but 
recently a case of this kind under my care proved incontrollable. 
I call the disorder " obscure " because we seem unable as yet to 
ascertain what is the precise mode of production of the subjec- 



AN ANALYTICAL EXPOSITION OF ITS EFFECTS. 25 

tive sounds in question. I have assured myself that the proxi- 
mate cause of them in the majoritj^ of cases is %jt?semia ; but 
in some cases they seem to be due to an opposite condition of 
the cerebral circulation, and thus, in this respect, are probably 
analogous to sleep, which may be produced as a consequence of 
both hyphemia and hj^^pertemia of the brain. In those cases which 
are incurable by the Neuro-dynamic method, by which the cerebral 
circulation may have been increased or lessened in accordance 
with the symptomatic indications, a permanent change, of the kind 
xisually called structural, has probably occurred in the nervous 
centres functionally related to the auditory apparatus, or an ex- 
citing cause of the morbid phenomenon in question continues to 
operate, and may be irremoveable — indeed, most likely, undis- 
coverable. 

Suhjective Spectra. — Just as there are subjective sounds and, I 
may add, subjective smells, so there are subjective spectra, which, 
indeed, are experienced quite as often, perhaps, as subjective 
sounds, and certainly much oftener than subjective smells. Case 4 
affords an interesting example of this kind : the patient was much 
afflicted in the night by the vision of a very bright light — 
"brighter than any bti de-light I ever saw," she said, and, simul- 
taneously, with an "inexplicable feeling of thorough terror and 
distress, which frequently compelled her to get out of bed and pray 
to be relieved of it." These morbid experiences, as well as several 
others which accompanied them, were completely put an end to 
by the treatment adopted. 

Giddiness occurred in Cases 28, 45, 53, 64, 75, and 100. In Case 
28, the patient had been troubled with frequent giddiness, along 
with great pain in the head, almost every daj/ during some hours 
for upwards of a month. She was first submitted to treatment in 
the middle of January, 1868, and in the middle of the following- 
April had become quite well. In Case 45 there was frequent • 
giddiness, which rapidly lessened under the influence of the 
Spinal Ice-bag. Unfortunately, I did not see the patient after I 
last prescribed for her, and am therefore unable to report the final 
effects of the treatment in her case. In Case 53 the patient 
suffered from great giddiness, which often caused her to reel. She 
said, " After sleeping I wake up so dreadfully giddy." Her giddi- 
ness was associated with pain in the head. At the end of two 
months from the time when her treatment began, the trouble in 
question had ceased entirely. In Case 64 giddiness was a fre- 
quently recurring symptom, which was associated with pain in 
the back of the head, and which, under treatment, subsided along 
with it. In Case 100 the giddiness was an accompaniment of 
sciatica, and the two were cured simultaneously. 

Sleeplessness and its successful treatment are exemplified in 

D 



26 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICmE EXEMPLIFIED : 

Cases 10, 13, 48, 61, 63, 74, and 75. Of course, in the majority 
of cases sleeplessness has an obvious cause — severe pain, for 
example ; and in such cases sleep is at once procured when its 
preventitive is removed. In Case 10 the patient was greatly en- 
feebled by the want of sleep, such sleep as she had being procured 
only by means of narcotics. She was kept awake by terrific pain. 
In Case 13 the patient's sleep " was generally broken and unre- 
freshing " because her nervous system was generally disordered. 
In Case 48 the patient was in constant pain during the night so 
that, as she said, she only dozed a little when overpowered with 
exhaustion. In Case 61 neuralgic attacks, usually lasting from 
10 p.m. till 3 a.m., precluded the possibility of sleep. In Case 63 
the pain was so horribly severe at night that the patient often 
walked about the room, being unable to rest in bed. She said, 
" I get about a quarter of an hour's sleep, and then lie awake all 
night." In Case 74 the patient was kept awake half the night 
by " burning heats," followed by coldness. In Case 75 sleep was 
prevented by intense pain in the head and sudden and extreme 
flushing, followed by profuse perspiration. In Case 76 the patient 
said, ''If I had my choice I'd rather go through my labour pains 
than bear what I have to suft'er of a night." She often sat up a 
considerable part of the night from fear of the pain coming on. 
And finally, in Case 67, during a period of about three years im- 
mediately before the patient consulted me she suffered so severely 
at night that, as a rule, she was dependent for what sleep she had 
on alcohol, opium, morphia, chloroform, or hydrate of chloral. 

That neuralgia is prone to be much more severe during the 
night than during the day is a recognised fact — a fact which I 
have, elsewhere, endeavoured to explain.* The physiological 
condition of the nervous centres which I have shown to be the 
proximate cause of this tendency is one which is peculiarlycapable 
of removal by the Neuro-dynamic method of treatment and by no 
other; and hence it is that Neuro-dynamic medicine possesses sleep- 
giving power in a pre-eminent degree. It is to be expected that 
inasmuch as all the cases here reported are characterised by the 
presence of pain as a prominent symptom, the sleeplessness notable 
in several of these cases would be due to the increasingly-severe 
pain at night, and that its cure was effected by abolishing that 
pain. I must add, however, that in cases which have come under 
my care, of insomnolence unaccompanied, and therefore not 
caused, by pain, the sleep-giving power in question is not less 
strikingly manifested ; indeed, even in cases in which that symp- 
tom is not a prominent feature of the malady under treatment, 
and in which pain is not experienced, refreshing sleep is often 

* See my work on "Neuralgia," p. 171, et seq. 



AN ANALYTICAL EXPOSITION OF ITS EFFECTS. 27 

induced incidentally by the Neuro-dynamic method. Numerous 
proofs of the truth of this statement are given in the work just 
mentiooned.* 

Talking during Sleep. — In Case 5 the patient habitually talked 
"nonsense " in her sleep ; and in Case 96, even when the patient, 
a boy, was quite free from his gastric and enteric troubles " he 
often talked in a rambling manner as if delirious " during sleep. 
In both cases the disorder was rapidly and completely cured by 
means of the Spinal Ice-bag. 

Tendencies to Insanity were observable in Cases 29, 34, and 75. 
In Case 29 the patient's mind had become seriously impaired ; she 
experienced great mental confusion and loss of memory. She 
was in the habit of sitting for hours without speaking to any one. 
When her attacks of headache and neuralgia came on she was 
seized with an irresistible feeling of dislike of her husband and 
cliildren, and wished them away from her. In Case 34 the neu- 
ralgia was usually associated with headache, more or less general, 
confusion of ideas, mental apathy and depression. In Case 75 
there was melancholy and a tendency to suicide. In each of 
these cases a complete cure was effected. The cerebral distur- 
bances here indicated were comparatively slight ; but experience 
has proved that in graver cases great benefit can be conferred. In 
one case under my care in which the patient had been haunted 
during several years by fixed and delusive ideas, a complete cure 
was effected by the Neuro-dynamic method. In another case the 
patient was so grievously afflicted that his relatives felt the 
gravest apprehensions concerning him : he became disqualified 
from continuing his usual work ; he shrank v/ith terror from 
seeing visitors, whose approach often made him tremble and 
break out suddenly in perspiration ; he suffered from attacks of 
great depression Or melancholia ; sometimes he was wildly excited; 
and not unfrequently it was necessary that he should be carefully 
watched lest he should harm himself. In this case a complete 
cure was effected by the Neuro-dynamic method ; and if at any 
time subsequently he over-worked himself, as he was apt to do, 
and had a relapse, he was again rapidly restored by the same 
method. I may add here that in a case of incipient insanity, 
under the care of Dr. Brereton, of Sydney, he treated the disease, 
as he informed me, successfully hy means of the Spinal Ice-bag ; 
that the late Dr. O'Ferrall, of Dublin, gave me an account of a 
case of acute mania, suddenly developed in a patient in St. 
Vincent's Hospital, and which was rapidly subdued in the same 
way ; that a lady suffering from " hysterical mania " was restored 
to sanity during the first day of treatment by the Spinal Ice-bag, 

* See my work on "Neuralgia," p. 289, et seq. 

D 2 



28 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : 

which was prescribed by that eminent physician — the late Dr. 
Symonds, of Bristol ; that Dr. AUbutt, of Leeds, has found the 
Spinal Ice-bag " strikingly successful in maniacal conditions ; " 
and that at the Asylum at Ticehurst, in certain cases of insanitj- 
associated with cerebral h5^er8emia, heat applied by means of the 
Spinal water-bag has been found to exert a powerfully beneficial 
influence. 

Imixdrment of Memory was a distinctive feature of Cases 29 and 
76. The patient, in Case 29, said, — " I can scarcely recollect any- 
thing : I've often given people wrong change at the counter " (she 
kept a small shop). This was the state of her memory January 25, 
1868, when I began to treat her ; and already, in the middle of 
the following May, her memory was so much improved that she 
said, — " I can recollect anything now." In Ca?e 76 the patient, 
when I first saw her, in May, 1871, complained especially of her 
loss of memory ; but in the following July, while still under 
treatment, she volunteered the remark that her memory was im- 
proved. This satisfactory result in these cases was undoubtedly 
due to the establishment of a regular and equable circulation of 
blood in the brain by the sedative action of the Spinal Ice-bag, 
chiefly on those nervous centres which control the cerebral circu- 
lation, but partly also by the like action on the spinal cord, many 
of the fibres of which are directly continuous with those of the 
brain itself. 

Impairment of Sight was a prominent symptom in Cases 3, 4, 
7, 27, 29, and 57. In Case 3 the sight before treatment was so 
feeble and dim that the patient, aged thirty -five, could not tell 
the time by the church clock, which was close to her house ; and 
one object often appeared to her, she said, as several : after the 
treatment had continued eighteen days the patient declared that 
her vision had become quite clear and normal. In Case 4 the 
patient, M^ho complained that her sight was often dim, found that 
it had become " much clearer " after she had applied the Spinal 
Ice-bag as directed during only one week. In Case 7 the patient 
could not distinguish objects or recognise persons at a moderate 
distance from her. If she read, her eyes became suflused with 
tears, and on dark or dull days she could scarcely read at all. Both 
her pupils were remarkably large, and contracted very slightly in 
the presence of light. She complained that h^r eyes were 
gradually getting worse. With the right eye she co^^ld only read 
test type (Snellen's) No. 3i-, and with the left No. 2|. This was 
the condition of her eyes August 7th, 1863, when I began to 
treat her. By September 24th the troublesome lachrymation had 
quite ceased, the pupils had contracted to their normal size, the 
eyes felt much stronger, and the patient could see distant objects 
much more clearly than formerly. In the latter part of October, 



AN ANALYTICAL EXPOSITION OF ITS EFFECTS. 29 

when the J)atient was dismissed from the hospital cured of _ all her 
grave maladies, hei pupils continued normally contractile, and 
her visual power had so improved that she could read test type 1^ 
with each eye. In Case 27 the patient, who was fifty- six years 
old, was unable, when I first saw him, to read smaller test type 
than 5| with either eye ; after treatment, during only three 
weeks, he could read test type 4|- easily and 3|-_with difficulty. 
In Case 29 the patient, who complained that during the onset of 
her neuralgic paroxysms the sight of both her eyes became dim, 
reported that one of the results of the treatment which she 
underwent was a great improvement of her visual power. But of 
the six cases here given, in which vision was improved by the 
Neuro-dynamic method, that numbered 57 is incomparably the 
most remarkable. During full five years the patient had suffered 
from temporary and frequently-recurring blindness, which was 
rapidly, completely, and permanently cured by that method — 
heat being the agent employed. Mr. Ernest Hart has published 
an account of a Case of Amaurosis, in which a wonderful im- 
provement was effected by the Spinal Ice-bag ; and one of my 
patients who was suffering from Diabetes, and who was cured by 
the Neuro-dynamic method, found his visual power so much in- 
creased, quite incidentally, that he wrote to me, — "But the most 
wonderful thing is that, whereas during the last thirty years I 
have been in the habit of wearing spectacles, my sight is now so 
improved that I never use them, unless there happens to be a 
dull light." 

Numbness, or Impairment of Sensibility, was experienced in ai- 
marked degTee in Cases 27, 28, and 76. In Case 27, the numb- 
ness of both hands, when the patient came to me, was sucli that 
he could not feel the two points of the festhesiometer in his riglit 
palm until they were eight lines apart, and not until they were 
twelve lines apart in the left. He Avas treated exclusively by the ■ 
Neuro-dynamic method, and in nine days his sensitiveness had so 
improved that he had become able to feel two points at four lines 
apart in the right palm, and at three lines apart in the left, 
In Cases 28 and 76, the numbness was greatly heightened 
at the beginning of the neuralgic paroxysms. In Cases 27 and 
28, normal sensitiveness was completely restored. In Case 76 — a 
very severe one — the patient found it very difficult to supply her- 
self with ice, and her experience affords an instructive example of 
the alternate decrease and increase of the numbness in correspon- 
dence with her use or disuse of the Spinal Ice-bag. 

Partial Paralysis is exemplified in Cases 27, 29, 30, 40, and 
76. In Case 27, the upper extremities were chiefly affected, and 
the patient's fingers had become so weak that he was disabled 
from continuing his usual work, that of making the tops of 
Broadwood's grand pianos, an employment which involves the 



30 NEUEO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : 

exertion of great force by the fingers in the scraping of the wood. 
When he had been under treatment three weeks^ his hand, and 
especially his fingers, had become much stronger : he could 
already scrape the wood far more effectively than he had been 
able to do for many months previously, and at length his hands 
became thoroughly strong again. In Case 29, the paralytic symp- 
tom, associated with the numbness which was present, consisted 
chiefly in a feeling of heaviness of the lower extremities — the 
right being most affected. In Case 30, the patient suffered in a 
very similar way, so that he was sometimes unsteady in walking, 
especially when going dowu-stairs. In both these cases the 
patients re-acquired normal strength in the affected limbs. In 
Case 40 — a case of brachial neuralgia — the right arm and hand 
became " partially paratysed at times : " after she had been under 
treatment a month, she reported that they had become decidedly 
stronger. In Case 76, the attacks of brachial neuralgia from 
which she suffered were accompanied with paralysis : the patient 
said, — " The arm seems to be immediately paralysed ;" if she had 
anything in her hand she was obliged to drop it, unless it were 
taken from her. She was obliged to give up her ordinary 
domestic duties, and, for many months before she came to me, 
she had been unable to dress herself At the end of two months 
of treatment, in reply to my inquiry what evidence she could 
give me of improvement in her arms, she said, — " Why, being 
able to use them : I can now dress myself easily, and can use my 
needle." 

That the efficacy of the Djaiamic method of treating paralysis 
is remarkably great is attested by the reports of several striking 
cases published by me in the Mp-dical Press and Circular for 
May 1st, 8th, and 29th, 1867, and by the confirmatory ex- 
periences of several physicians, among whom I may especially 
mention Dr. J. H. Benson and Dr. Hewitt, of Dublin, and Dr. 
Townsend, junr., of Cork. 

Disorders of Local Nutrition {Trophic Phenomena: Swelling 
and Tenderness). — These disorders are among the most generally 
recognised and characteristic comj)lications of neuralgia, and 
have often, therefore, been adverted to in the preceding pages. 
Swelling and tenderness of the scalp are exemplified in Cases 
11, 29, and 92. In Case 11, the neuralgic attack, with its 
accompaniments, was of recent origin, and as an example of the 
rapidity with which, in such a case, the phenomena in question, 
as well as the pain, may be subdued by the proper application of 
heat, it is especially instructive. In Case 29, the swelling, which 
was most notable in the forehead, was accompanied by a sense 
of " burning heat," which, along with the pain, often invaded the 
roof of the mouth. In Case 92 the tenderness of the scalp was 
very pronounced. 



AN ANALYTICAL EXPOSITION OF ITS EFFECTS, 31 

The face was accustomed to swell during the attacks in Cases 
56 and 82 ; in the latter case the focus of pain was not only- 
swollen, but became very red, and could be seen as well as felt to 
throb. In this case heat to the cilio-spinal region acted like a 
charm. 

Swelling of the back of the neck, expressive of reflex action 
through trophic nerves morbidly excited by sensory nerves dis- 
tributed to the wrist which had been wounded, is notable in the 
remarkable case, No. 73, to which I have alread)^ called special 
attention. In Case 28 there was also some swelling and tender 
ness in the cervical region, which were completely subdued by the 
treatment adopted. 

Diminution of swelling of the hands by the Nenro-d3aiamic 
method is exemplified in Cases 14, 18, 28, 35, 36, and 76. I saw 
the patient, whose case is numbered 18, at several other times 
besides those mentioned in the report ; and certainly he was 
thoroughly assured that a direct remedial influence was exerted 
on his hands by the application of ice to the back of his neck. 
Case 28 is a striking example of a morbid aff"ection restricted 
almost exclusively to the trophic nerves of the hand ; about 
three times a week for several weeks immediately before I sav,- 
tlie patient her left hand had swollen, and had become hot, red, 
and numb ; it was not painful, but before swelling it itched during 
a few minutes ; the swelling lasted upwards of an hour. Under 
the influence of the Spinal Ice-bag this curious phenomenon soon 
ceased entirely. In Cases 14, 35 and 36, the action of the disordered 
spinal cord was strikingly manifested through the trophic nerves 
of the hands, and in these cases the remedial power of the Spinal 
Ice-bag over the disorder, as observable in the hands, was not less 
striking. In Case 76, the hand became swollen and red every 
time the patient experienced a severe neuralgic paroxysm, and in 
her case the swelling and redness were beneficially controiLd- 
within a week after the Spinal Ice-bag was first applied. '*'^,'' 

The lower extremities also exhibited the morbid action of the 
trophic nerves in Cases 3, 14, 18, 35, 36, 38, 46, and 77. In Case 3, 
the legs and feet were habitually swollen ; but in this case the 
swelling was, I apprehend, due rather to a lack of vital force in 
the capillary circulation, resulting in passive exudation into the 
tissues, than to any excessive action of the trophic nerves ; in 
Case 18, tlie swelling of the knee and anlde, which was consider- 
able, and probably of gouty origin, was reduced with surprising 
rapidity; in Cases 14, 35, and 36 the swelling was generally diffused 
over the lower extremities, and, in the first of these two cases, 
there were numerous ecchymoses ; in Case 38, the swelling of the 
knee came and went as an ordinary neuralgic complication ; in 
Case 46, there was swelling of the right ankle — ^most probably of 
a gouty nature ; and in Case 77, the swelling in question, which 



32 , NEURU -DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : 

was very pronounced, was undoubtedly due to gout. In all these 
cases the disorder was swiftly and entirely cured by the Neuro- 
dynamic method. 

The Development of tlte Mammcs Tnjiuenced hy the Neuro-dynaviic 
Method. — In Cases 1, 5, and 85, the mamma? were notably affected. 
In Case 1, the left mamma was considerably smaller than the right ; 
in Case 5, though tlie left mamma was very considerably developed, 
the right one was, as her mother remarked, ''' a mere piece of shin — 
quite flat." Under the influence of the Neu xo-dynamic treatment 
the left mamma in Case 1 became equal in size to the right, no 
difference between them being discernible ; in Case 5, the right 
mamma Avas so developed that the difference between the right 
and left was scarcely distinguishable. During the treatment the 
pain in the right breast in Case 1, and the rather hard and pain- 
ful swelling in the left breast in Case 5 disappeared. In Case 85, 
one of the incidental results of the treatment adopted was a 
development of the mammas so considerable as to cause the 
patient to express her belief that had she submitted to the treat- 
ment earlier she would have become a mother. 

In this connexion I may mention a very remarkable case of a 
man whose testicles were made to swell so considerably as to 
become painful every time the Spinal Ice-bag was applied in the 
dorso-lumbar region. 

Globus Hystericus. — In Case 38, tlie patient was distressed by 
" a burning lump " in her throat, which especially troubled her 
when she swallowed. It was cj[uickly and completely got rid of 
by the use of the Spinal Ice-bag. The patient in Case 83 was 
pregnant : she was tormented with a feeling in her throat, which 
she insisted was caused by a fish-bone that she had " swallowed " 
about three months previously. The distress produced by it had, 
she declared, been increasing ever since. The patient was sub- 
mitted to the Neuro-dynamic treatment October 4, 1871 ; on the 
10th she reported that her throat was "ever so much better," 
and that it did not wake her in the night as formerly ; on the 24th 
she said the throat continued "very much better; " and, on Nov. 
7th, she reported that the application of the upper cell of the 
Spinal Ice-bag along the cervical spine relieved her eacli time it 
was applied. As the feeling complained of was a phenomenon of 
reflex action, originated by the growing ovum, it was to be ex- 
pected that the tendency to its reproduction would continue, as it 
did, until the patient was delivered. Meanwhile, its subjugation 
by the Neuro-dynamic method is a fact as interesting and instruc- 
tive as it is important. 

Shortness of Breath. — In Case 13, in which the difficulty of 
breathing was especially pronounced, a great improvement was 
effected ; in Case 39, the like difficulty was removed altogether ; 
in Case 45;, the patient who, along with a cough, suffered from 



AN ANALYTICAL EXPOSITION OF ITS EFFECTS. 33 

shortness of breath when going up-hill or up-stairs^ declared that 
she had become miicli better in this respect. These are the only 
cases among the hundred here given in which I appear to have 
noted the symptom in question ; but it is probable that in some 
of the other cases in which there were chest symptoms, and in 
which a cure was efiected, difficulty of breathing, though not 
noted, was one of them. Speaking from experience in other cases, 
in which shortness of breath has been associated with inadequate 
performance of the menstrual function, I can state positively that 
in numerous cases this symptom, though very marked, has been 
made to vanish entirely by the Neuro-dynamic treatment. 

Cough was complained of in Cases 13, 39, 50, 53, 80, 94, and 
97. In Case 13, the lungs were very feeble and delicate, the 
whole constitution was especially weak, and the menstrual func- 
tion was particularly inadequate and unhealthy. But, even in 
this case, so much was done to allay the cough by improving the 
health of the nervous system, and thus, inter alia, at once 
increasing menstruation and rendering it painless, that, though 
she did not cease to cough altogether, she ceased for considerable 
periods together, and gained immensely in general health and 
strength. In Case 39, the patient had what she called " a dread- 
ful cough," of which she was completely relieved by the use of 
ice alone, so applied as to increase the circulation in the pelvic 
viscera and lower extremities. In Case 50, there was a cough, 
which was cured on the same principle and in the same way as 
the one in Case 39, the only difference being, that in Case 50, 
besides using ice, the patient took, during the first week of treat- 
ment, an ounce of infusion of calumba twice a day. Case 53 is 
a remarkable example of the cure of a distressing chest affec- 
tion without drugs, and without any application to the chest : 
the patient slept soundly, except that frequently, though not 
every night, she was seized with a violent cough, which lasted • 
from a few minutes to two hours, and caused a distressing 
"dragging" sensation at the base of the chest. The Neuro- 
dynamic treatment was the same in this case as in the two cases 
last mentioned, and was only supplemented by the prescri]Dtion of 
aperient pills, to be taken when the bowels were confined : the 
cough was rapidly and completely cured. In Case 80, cough, 
which was a prominent symptom, was markedly lessened within a 
week, and was speedily cured completely by the Neuro-dynamic 
treatment, the only addition being infusion of calumba. In 
Case 94, a boy, who had suffered during several months from " a 
very bad cough indeed," especially during the night, was quickly 
and completely cured. In Case 97, the patient had a severe 
cough which troubled her both winter and summer, and which, 
without any drugs, and without any applications to the chest 



34 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : 

itself, was so nearly abolished by the Neuro-dynamic treatment, 
continued during six weeks, that at the end of that time it 
scarcely troubled her at all. 

Exijectoration was a prominent symptom in Cases 13, 53, 80, 
and 97. In Case 13, it was so subdued that it continued absent 
for months together : and in the other cases it was abolished com- 
pletely by the Neuro-dynamic method, without drugs, and with- 
out any applications to the chest itself. 

In the course of this commentary, only those chest affections 
are adverted to which presented themselves incidentally along 
with other disorders ; but even these few cases will supply precious 
intimations to those who will duly consider them ; and my ex- 
perience enables me to add the assurance that, in the treatment 
of this group of disorders, the remedial power of the Neuro- 
dynamic method is extraordinarily great. 

Nausea and Vomiting. — These distressing symptoms, which are 
of very frequent occurrence, and which, in a large proportion of 
case, are incontrollable by drugs, presented themselves in Cases 
10, 22, 23, 24, 31, 43, 69, 72, 74, 83, 87, 88, 93, 95, 96, 97, 98, 
and 99. In Case 10, the patient had suffered during many years 
nearly every day from nausea, and occasionally vomited "water ;" 
in Case 22, the patient "vomited more or less throughout each 
menstrual period, and suffered much from nausea :" in both these 
cases the sickness was completely and permanentl)^ cured. In 
Case 23, the patient made the astonishing statement that since 
childhood she had vomited every morning of her life, and that 
her mother and two sisters were affected fti like manner : I pre- 
scribed for her on the first occasion, Dec. 18, 1867, and ten days 
afterwards she reported that she had not vomited at all since the 
ice was applied the third time. She was poor, and lived unhappily 
with her husband, and finding it difiicult to pay for the requisite 
amount of ice, she soon failed to apply it regularly ; and Feb. 15, 
1868, she reported that she was troubled with sickness about 
every other morning. She was then urged to use the ice more 
persistently ; and March 4th, she reported that though she still 
felt nausea occasionally, the vomiting had ceased. In Case 31, 
the patient suffered from " frequent vomiting — especially in the 
morning : the smallest disagreeable smell made her vomit." At 
the end of the first fortnight of treatment her vomiting stopped 
altogether. In the remarkable case. No. 43, the patient volun- 
teered the assurance that the Spinal Ice-bag stopped her sickness. 
In Case 72, the patient strained himself by carrying a heavy load, 
and during each day after the accident, until I saw him, he 
vomited the greater part of each meal a few minutes after taking 
it : by tlie Spinal Ice-bag alone his sickness was immediately and 
completely stopped. In Case 74, nausea and vomiting of six 



AN ANALYTICAL EXPOSITION OF ITS EFFECTS. 35 

months' duration were thoroughly abolished within a fortnight 
from the time the treatment began. In Case 87, the patient had 
also been troubled, during a long period, with the like symptoms, 
was completely relieved of them, and as rapidly as in the previous 
case. The remarkable case, No. 88, is worthy of especial atten- 
tion as a proof of the power of the Spinal Ice-bag, not only in 
stoi)ping severe and persistent vomiting, which drugs fail to 
control, but in removing the cause of the malady. Case 92 
exemplifies the same power : in this case the vomiting was due to 
inflammation of the kidneys. In Case 93, the patient had suffered 
during about five months from vomiting, which ceased completely 
and permanently as soon as the treatment had been continued a 
single day. In Case 95, the patient had suffered during more 
than two years from severe attacks of vomiting, which usually 
lasted from two to four hours, and which recurred oftener than 
once a week : not until exactly a month had elapsed from the 
time the treatment began did the vomiting recur ; it was then 
experienced but once, and from that date finally ceased. In Case 
96, the boy, sixteen years old, had suffered from very frequently 
recurring and severe attacks of vomiting since his infancy : from 
the time I began to treat him, March 18th, 1872, the vomiting 
steadily lessened, and on the 3rd of April following it ceased 
altogether. Cases 98 and 99 are truly wonderful instances of the 
efficacy of the therapeutical method in question. In Case 99, the 
patient vomited nearly every day, from Oct., 1871, to April, 1872, 
when I first saw her : her treatment began Ajpril 26 ; on the 28th 
the vomiting was markedly lessened ; on the 29th it ceased, and 
it has never since recurred. 

The Sickness of Pregnancy presented itself in Cases 83 and 98, 
in the first as a subordinate malady, in the second as the principal 
one ; in both the Spinal Ice-bag was wonderfully remedial, and, 
in Case 98, it recovered the reason and, in all probability, saved 
the life of the patient. This terrible malady, incomparably more 
prevalent, and far more serious, because far more prolonged, than 
sea-sickness, was like it, confessedly uncontrollable by medical art 
until the date (1863) when I demonstrated its curability by 
means of the Spinal Ice-bag. Since then several severe cases 
have been under my care (I have only been consulted in severe 
cases), and in every case the Neuro-dynamic treatment has proved 
successful. 

DiarrhoBci occurred in Cases 60, 69, 81, 86, 90, 96, and 99, 
and each of these cases presented peculiar features deserving 
special attention. In Case 60 the disorder recurred monthly as a 
prelude and accompaniment of the catamenia. Associated with 
the diarrhoea were pains in the abdomen so severe as, according 
to the patient's phrase, nearly to draw her double. In Case 69 



36 NEURO-UYNAISIIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : 

the disease occurred more or less throughout each catamenial 
period. In Case 81, the patient, a musician, had been long ac- 
customed to feel, whenever he was going to give a concert or to 
perform in public, a sort of apprehension affecting his bowels, and 
causing him to have a markedly loose stool about five minutes 
before the concert began. An endeavour to let the bowels act 
half-an-hour before was of no avail as a preventitive of the in- 
convenience complained of. In Case 86 the disease, which had 
lasted three months when I first saw the patient, troubled 
her both night and day : in the daytime the bowels were 
moved almost immediately after the patient took any food or 
drink, so that she was almost afraid to take anything, " because it 
brought it on ; " it also came on about midnight every night after 
she had been in bed about two hours, during Avhich she generally 
slept. In Case 90 the patient was attacked by diarrhoea each 
night about midnight, when the disease became very severe, and 
then gradually lessened towards morning ; the bowels were 
moved eight or nine times each twenty-four hours. In Case 96 
the patient, sixteen years old, had been afflicted with diarrhcea 
ever since his infancy : it was a common experience for the boy's 
bowels to be moved nine or ten times during the day, and several 
times during the night — the food often seeming to pass in an 
undigested state. Both the patient and his mother declared that 
the longest period that they could recollect him to have remained 
free from diarrhoea was five days at a time, " and then," his 
mother added, " it was when he was taking diarrhoea mixture." 
In Case 99 the patient had been suffering from diarrhoea almost 
incessantly during five months, when I was consulted, and had long 
been peculiarly prone to the disorder. Of course, as in each of 
these cases of this troublesome malady it had been unusually 
prolonged and intractable, I was not consulted until all the re- 
sources of the medical practitioners attending the patients had 
been tried and found of no avail. And yet in all these cases a 
complete cure was speedily effected by the Neuro-dynamic method 
of treatment, the success of which is still more fully exemplified 
in my reports of " Cases of Diarrhoea and Cholera," published in 
1871. 

Flatulency is exemplified in Cases 3, 59, and 85. Indeed, it is 
so common an accompaniment of disorders of the nervous system, 
that it doubtless occurred in many other of the cases given in this 
volume, though I do not appear to have recorded its presence. 
Cases 3 and 85 were well deserving of the expressive epithet — 
drum-belly. That in these and in like cases the flatus is not 
produced by chemical decomposition of the ingesta, but that it is 
formed from the blood, and effused by the mucous membrane by 
the morbidly excessive operation of nerve force, is, in my opinion, 



AN ANALYTICAL EXPOSITION OP ITS EFFECTS. 37 

provable by facts and arguments which cannot be gainsaid. If so 
we must suppose it probable, a xj'^'^ori, that the disorder will be 
treated most successfully by suitably modifying the condition of 
the nervous system ; and experience, as reported in Cases 3 and 
85, as well as in many other cases of the disorder which I have 
treated, proves the supposition to be well founded. 

Constipation was a symptom in Cases 7, 10, 13, 20, 22, 29, 30, 
39, 40, 49, 53, 59, 87, 88, 91, 92, 95. In all these cases, except 
those numbered respectively 30, 39, and 59, it is shown in the 
reports that the constipation was overcome by the Neuro-dyuamic 
treatment ; and, though in the three cases last named the im- 
provement in the action of the bowels is not reported, the general 
restoration of health which was effected leads me to believe that 
the function of the bowels became normal. The doctrine that by 
one and the same method of treatment diseases so opposite in 
character, as diarrhoea on the one hand, and constipation on the 
other, may be most thoroughly cured seems paradoxical, and yet 
in reality it is not so. In cases of diarrhoea the nervous centres, 
which innervate the mucous lining and muscular coat of the in- 
testines, are chiefly involved in tumultuous excitement, hence 
the exuberant out-pouring from the niTicous membrane, and the 
violent action of the vermicular muscles of the tube. In cases of 
constipation, which is generally a chronic malady, the intestine is 
insufficiently nourished, owing to an excessively energetic action 
of its vaso-motor nerve centres. As by that excessive action its 
blood-vessels are unduly contracted it receives an insufficient 
supply of blood ; the consequence is, both its mucous membrane 
and its muscular coat are inadequately nourished. In fact, the 
muscular coat is in many cases so enfeebled as to become all but 
paralysed from sheer want of nourishment. Assuming the cor- 
rectness of this explanation, it is evident that a sedative influence 
exerted on the nervous centres concerned in the production of' 
both diarrhoea and constipation, seems likely, a 2)7'iori, to prove 
curative of both diseases, as indeed experience shows that it does ; 
but in cases of diarrhoea the nervous centres which are chiefly 
disordered are, I apprehend, more immediately spinal — more 
directly connected with the brain than are those which are chiefly 
disordered in cases of chronic constipation, and which are more 
exckisively sympathetic — vaso-motor, in fact — and thus secluded 
as far as possible from cerebral, or emotional influences. 

Deficient Menstruation. — Tlie great prevalence of this dis- 
order is decisively attested by the fact that it was present 
in about a fourth of the whole hundred cases here given as 
cases in which pain was a prominent symptom, although 
several of the patients whose cases are here reported were of 
the male sex. The disorder occurred in Cases 1, 6, 7, 9, 
22, 25, 29, 31, 33, 41, 42, 45, 47, 49, 50, 54, 60, 63, 64, 



38 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED: 

69, and 84 ; and in all these cases, except 42 and 45, the 
catamenia were increased in quantity, and, in several of the cases 
in which there was scope for improvement, it was also improved 
in quality. Even in the two excepted cases an improvement was 
effected : in Case 42 the pain and giddiness incidental to men- 
struation were abolished, and it is more than probable that had 
the treatment been prolonged, the flow would have been decidedly 
increased; and the same remarks apply to Case 45. The aggre- 
gate result here described is surely very remarkable, and the 
more experience of the diseases peculiar to women is possessed by 
anyone who considers this result, the more readilj^ will he ac- 
knowledge that it is without parallel in the thertapeutical history 
of the malady in question. 

Retarded and Excessive Menstruation are exemplified in Cases 
3 and 66. In Case 3 the patient had often passed seven and 
eight weeks without menstruating, and then again she STiffered 
from profuse menorrhagia. In Case 66 the patient had menstru- 
ated every sixth or seventh week profusely, and had continued to 
do so during several years. Both these patients became, under 
the influence of the Neuro-dynamic treatment, quite " regular " 
in respect to both time and quantity. 

Retaided and Scanty Menstruation. — In Case 37 the patient 
went from six to ten weeks without the recurrence of the cata- 
menia, which Avere especially scanty : although she was under 
treatment only six weeks, the flow was rendered decidedly more 
copious ; whether or not it was accelerated, she was not under 
treatment long enough to show. In Case 44 the menses had been 
completely suppressed during three months, when she came under 
my care, Oct. 24, 1868 : on the 30th she bega.n to menstruate, 
and continued to do so till the end of Nov. 2nd. This effect was 
wrought by the Spinal Ice-bag alone ; I had previously treated 
her with aloes and arsenic in succession without benefit. In 
Case 68 the patient had not menstruated for three months when 
she consulted me, Feb. 4, 1871, and before the menses were wholly 
suppressed, they had always been especially scanty, and very 
painful. The function was restored May 19th, the flow being- 
free, of good colour, lasting three days, and painless. During 
the first three weeks of May this patient, besides using the Lum- 
bar Ice-bag, took pilulse aloes et ferri, gr. v., omni nocte. But 
the most remarkable case of this kind of which I have had ex- 
perience is Case 67. In that case the menses had been completely 
suppressed during eleven years ; they were, nevertheless, restored 
— have recurred with increasing frequency, until at length they 
have done so monthly. This patient had previously had the help 
of several physicians, and I do not hesitate to affirm that this 
restoration was effected solely, and could only have been effected 
by the Neuro-dynamic method. 



AN ANALYTICAL EXPOSITION OF ITS EFFECTS. 39 

Intermittent Menstruation, of which I have seen and cured 
several cases, was a notable feature in Cases 13 and 25, in which 
the menstrual flow and menstrual pain alternated with each other, 
and in which, while the pain was abolished, the flow was rendered 
continuous. 

Leucorrhoea was experienced in Cases 3, 7, 25, 31, 37, 39, 42, 
53, 54, 60, 62, 63, 64, 65, &&, 68, 69, 76, 80, 83, 84, 85, 91, and 
97. Of the twenty-four cases here given there were thirteen in 
which the leucorrhoeal discharge was stopped completely. In 
nearly all the remaining cases it was so nearly stopped that, practi- 
cally speaking, the patients considered them cured ; and in all 
of them the great improvement effected gave a reliable promise 
that by continuing the treatment a little longer a complete cure 
might have been effected in every case. As an example of what 
the Neuro-dynamic method can do in this disorder. Case 65 is 
deserving of special attention. The patient had suffered from it 
during many years : the discharge was so profuse that it saturated 
her stockings, and often compelled her even to change her boots ; 
and yet by the use of the Spinal Ice-bag alone she was quickly 
and thoroughly cured ! The grounds of strong commendation of 
Neuro-dynamic therapeutics in cases of leucorrhoea are threefold : 
1st, the treatment effects a healthy change in the nervous system, 
disorder of which is the proximate cause of the disease, and hence 
it removes the cause ; 2nd, this treatment dispenses altogether 
with the necessity of the disagreeable process — injections into the 
vagina ; and, 3rd, it is pre-eminently successful. 

Prolapsus Uteri. — In Case 3 the patient suffered so severely 
from this disease that, in fact, the womb often protruded " quite 
out " of the vaginal orifice — generally after she had used any 
extra physical exertion. In Case 25 the patient was habitually 
troubled with " bearing down of the womb." In Case 29 the 
report says, — the patient "suffered from prolapsus uteri, on ac; 
count of which she began to have medical advice two years 
before" she consulted me. In Case 65 the patient suffered from 
" habitual prolapsus uteri — the mouth of the womb often pro- 
truding through the os vaginae." In Case 80 the patient had a 
constant sense of bearing down of the womb : " when I walk," 
she said, " I feel as if it were all open — so peculiar ; when it's 
worst my cough is very violent." In each of these cases a com- 
plete cure was effected, without the aid of drugs, without the 
use of pessaries, and indeed without any appliance to the womb 
itself, by the simple, but thoroughly scientific, expedient of 
strengthening the whole of the pelvic viscera by increasing their 
supply of blood, and therefore of nutrition — a process easily ac- 
complished by the Neuro-dynamic method. Surely, the cures 
here recorded of the extremely distressing malady in question — 



40 NEURO-DYNAMIO MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : 

a malady hitherto incurable — should be sufficient of themselves 
alone to constrain professional study of Neuro-dynamic medicine, 
which, however, seems likely to be practically appreciated by the 
people long before any, but a few isolated physicians here and 
there, have condescended even to examine it. 

Excessively Frequent Micturition. — The necessity of '" making 
water" with extreme frequency is an especially prevalent disorder, 
indeed, even medical art has hitherto been powerless to remedj^ ; 
which, however, the etiology of the malady, like several others now 
passed in review, has not hitherto been understood. This disease is 
simply a result and expression of excessive reflex activity of those 
excito-motor nerve centres in the spinal cord which are functionally 
related to the bladder. Being so, the disease cannot be 
cured by efforts directed to the bladder itself ; but how easily 
a cure can be effected by the sedative influence of cold applied 
over the spinal cord is decisively demonstrated by the ex- 
perience recorded in the reports of Cases 7, 25, 29, 30, 37, 38, 42, 
43, 52, 56, 70, and 78. 

Albuminuria, with Anasarca. — The rapid abolition of these 
symptoms, which presented themselves in Case 92, and which 
were no doubt due to acute inflammation of the kidneys, is 
especially remarkable and interesting. Feb. 21, 1872, the scalp, 
face, hypogastric region, and the legs and feet Avere swollen — the 
latter being generally so, and also cedematous ; and the urine was 
loaded with albumen. Feb. 26, after treatment during five days 
the swelling had almost subsided, and the amount of albumen iii 
the urine was strikingly lessened. By March 4th the dropsj^ had 
quite disappeared, and the amount of albumen in the urine had 
become extremely slight ; and on March 18th, there being no 
trace of albumen in the urine, and all other symptoms having 
vanished, the patient was dismissed cured. 

By reference to the report of this case it will be seen that, 
besides the Spinal Ice-bag, drugs and the Turkish bath were also 
used in the treatment of it ; and I shall not attempt to determine 
to what extent they contributed to effect the cure ; but as an 
aid to the judgment of my readers I may mention that I have 
cured a case of albuminuria, which had existed a considerable 
time, by the Neuro-djaiamic method alone. 

Diabetes Mellitus. — Cases 8 and 15 exemplify the successful 
treatment of this formidable disease by the Neuro-dynamic method. 
In Case 8 the patient, during the period of treatment, took no 
medicine, and had the ordinary diet of Guy's Hospital — neither 
saccharine nor farinaceous matters being withheld. Nevertheless, 
during the period of treatment, extending over only six weeks, 
the amount of urine voided daily was gradually reduced from 
eighteen to seven pints, the general health of the patient being 



AN ANALYTICAL EXPOSITION OF ITS EFFECTS. 41 

correspondingly improved meanwhile. Unfortunately he felt him- 
self so thoroughly recovered, that at the end of the six weeks of 
treatment he insisted on leaving the hospital, and was lost sight of. 

Case 15 exhibits results less striking, perhaps, than those of 
Case 8, but not less satisfactory ; and as attesting the power of 
the Neuro-dynamic method in the treatment of this disease, I 
may mention that in a case confided to me by Dr. Goolden, at 
St. Thomas's Hospital, after the patient had been treated during 
a considerable period by means of the Turkish bath, I succeeded 
in reducing the amount of urine voided daily from five pints 
to four, and its specific gravity from 1030 to 1022 ; also, that , 
in a case in my private practice which had been previously 
treated by the celebrated Eicord, I effected a complete cure 
of the disease : in that case the rapidity with which the cure 
was effected was no less astonishing than was the fact of the cure 
itself. 

Coldness of the Extremities was a prominent symptom in Cases 
1, 8, 9, 10, 15, 22, 24, 25, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 33, 39, 40, 42, 43, 
45, 47, 50, 56, 58, 60, 61, 63, 64, 68, 74, 81, 84, 91, 95, 96, 97. 

Coldness of the general surface of the Body is exemplified by 
Cases 4, 52, 86, 90, 95. 

These cases prove in the most decisive and striking manner 
that the peripheral circulation can be powerfully and beneficially 
influenced, without acting in any way directly on the surface of 
the body, by the simple expedient of modifying the temperature 
along the spine. I refrain from referring more particularly here 
to the evidence which these supply of the truth in question be- 
cause in the previous section I have already, for another purpose, 
adduced that evidence in detail. 

Tender-ness along the Spine was observable in Cases 32, 35, 36, 
37, 43, 51, 58, 66, 72, 73, 76, 78, 80, 86, 90, and 97. The fact 
that this symptom is reported to have obtained in this large pro- - 
portion of the whole hundred cases in question affords considerable 
corroboration of the general doctrine insisted on throughout my 
medical writings that the various diseases now passed in rapid re- 
view are all, essentially and fundamentally, diseases of the nervous 
system. It is probable that a considerably larger proportion of the 
hundred cases would have exhibited this tenderness if all of them 
had been examined : what proportion of them were not examined 
I am, however, unfortunately unable to say. As spinal tender- 
ness was not usually a symptom complained of, and as it usually 
becomes undiscoverable when the morbid phenomena in different 
parts of the body with which it is associated are no longer ob- 
servable, I have not, as a rule, kept any record of its disappear- 
ance along with these phenomena. Its existence, however, is 
none the less interesting and instructive. 



42 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : 

The Correlations of Dij^erent Diseases. — On this subject a very 
important and a very instructive chapter might, and, indeed, no 
doubt will, be written ; but here I must crowd what I have to 
say upon it into two or three pages. If, as intimated in the pre- 
ceding paragraph, the diseases now passed in review are all 
phenomena of disease of the nervous system, it is manifest that, 
as they arise out of a common ground, they must be fundamentally 
related, and that given any particular disease which is a pheno- 
menon of a morbid affection of some particular part of the spinal 
cord, or of some particular ganglionic centre, the development of 
other diseases which are phenomena of a morbid affection of 
neighbouring parts of the spinal cord, or of neighbouring gan- 
glionic centres, may be predicted with the certainty that in a 
large proportion of cases, at least, the prediction will prove true. 
And, conversely, it maj^ be predicted with equal certitude that 
a method of treatment which proves curative of one of a 
group of such correlated maladies will prove curative of its 
correlatives also. 

Some time ago I was consulted by a lady, who informed me 
that she is liable to hsemorrhoids, and that she is especially 
troubled with them at or about her catamenial periods. In fact, 
in her opinion, which she volunteered to me, the two discharges 
produce each other : whichever begins first, the other is pretty 
sure to follow. Another of my patients, who used to be liable to 
pulmonary htemorrhage, was especially prone to it during her cata- 
menial periods, or immediately afterwards. In both these cases 
the catamenia were undulj^ copious. In a third case under my 
care, and the particulars of which were published in the Medical 
Mirror, the patient had suffered from profuse and often recurring 
hsemorrhage from the bowels during upwards of twenty years, 
and yet she menstruated regularly and abundantly. It is evident 
therefore that the hsemorrhoids in the first case, the pulmonary 
haemorrhage in the second, and enteric haemorrhage in the third, 
cannot have been vicarious of the catamenia, although in the 
first and in the second case the morbid discharge was especially 
liable to occur in connection with the catamenial period. I regret 
that in the third case I did not give special attention to this point, 
and therefore did not learn from the patient whether she was 
especially liable to the attacks of enteric hsemorrhage at her 
menstrual periods. After my attention had been arrested by 
these cases, I began to look out for similar cases, and I have 
found that they are by no means rare : in the present year (1872) 
two cases of this kind came before me in one afternoon. One of 
them was a case of pulmonary, the other of enteric, haemorrhage, 
associated with the catamenia. 

Now, as these haemorrhages were not vicarious of the catamenia^ 



AN ANALYTICAL EXPOSITION OF ITS EFFECTS. 43 

and, as in the first and second case, they came on most especially 
at the catamenial periods, the interesting question arises, — why, in 
these two cases, was the hsemorrhagic tendency especially strong 
during the catamenial periods ? I have reflected much on this 
problem, which I have never seen adverted to by any medical 
writer, and which therefore, so far as I know, has never been 
explained. The following explanation, if not the true one, will 
perhaps seem worthy at least of provisional acceptance, and will, 
at all events, serve, I believe, as a valuable guide to treatment in 
cases like those in question. 

I must premise, in accordance with the doctrine expressed in 
the first paragraph of this section, that, as a general rule, when 
any special condition of the circulation of the blood in any part 
of the body occurs — any grade of anaemia, hypersemia, or con- 
gestion, for example — there is a tendency in the organism to 
extend that condition to adjoining or surrounding parts, the parts 
immediately contiguous partaking of that condition most com- 
pletely, and those more remote less so in proportion to their 
distance. Thus, for example, that form of local hyperaemia and 
ultimate inflammation known as a common boil, is characterised 
by a gradual diffusion of the morbid condition throughout the 
surrounding parts — that condition becoming less and less marked 
in the parts increasingly remote from the centre of inflammation, 
until at length it is no longer perceptible. Now, such I hold 
to be the case in respect to the nervous, as well as in respect 
to all other vascular, structures. Assuming that it is so, and I 
presume no one will deny the correctness of this assumption, we 
have, I think, in this fact rightly interpreted the explanation of 
the tendency to simultaneousness of the discharges in question, 

The phenomena of menstruation, if not actually of nervoas 
origin, are certainly very intimately connected with the functional 
activity of the nervous system. During the times between each 
catamenial period the ganglionic nervous centres, functionally 
related to the womb, are acting with that amount of energy 
which is necessary to maintain the uterine arteries in their 
ordinary state of constringency — a state which allows of the 
withdrawal from them of the amount of blood requisite for the 
nourishment of the organ. But at length that energy is over- 
balanced : the positive motor nerve centres (trophic and secretory) 
related to the reproductive organs enter on their periodical phase 
of excitement, and transmit a correspondingly great amount of force 
to every part of the ovaries and womb. Each part thus rendered, 
as it were, powerfully electric, is enabled to attract, through the 
arteries which supply it, a larger amount of blooi than before, 
and, as all the parts are thus acted on simultaneously, there is a 
general enlargement and turgescence of the organs. The swelling 
of the ovaries attains its miximum when they extrude the ova 



44 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED. 

into the fimbriated extremities of the Fallopian tubes ; but the 
swelling of the womb, and the sanguineous tide flooding every 
part of it, begin to subside only when, after distending to the 
uttermost the delicate capillary vessels of the uterine mucous 
membrane, the blood oozes through their exquisitely thin walls, 
and escaping into the uterine cavity constitutes, along with the 
modified product of the glandlets of that membrane, the menstrual 
flux. Gradually the cerebro-spinal, or positive motor, force which, 
temporarily over-balancing the sympathetic or negative motor, 
produces these tumultuous phenomena, declines again, and the 
quiescent life of the organs, due to the equipoise of these two 
forces, is resumed. Now, when the cerebro-spinal centres in 
question enter on their monthly, or at least periodical, state of 
hyperaemia, excitement, and predominance over their corresponding 
sympathetic centres, the temporarily hyperiemic condition of the 
former is generally extended more or less to proximate centres. 
If, however, certain centres in the spinal cord, though less near to 
those primarily affected as described, are from any cause more 
susceptible to disturbing influences, they will tell even more dis- 
tinctly of those influences than will those centres which are actually 
the nearest to the focus of disturbance ; for example, the fact of 
the intimate functional and sympathetic relation between the 
positive motor nerves of the uterus and those of the mammae 
explains the commonly observed swelling of the latter as a prelude 
and accompaniment of menstruation. Whenever the peculiar 
vascular condition of any given nervous centre is propagated to 
others, the circulation of the blood in the peripheral parts to 
which those centres are functionally related will be correspondingly 
disturbed, and if the peripheral blood-vessels of those parts — the 
mucous membrane of the bowels or of the bronchial tubes, for 
example — be in any given case especially feeble, haemorrhage from 
them is likely to occur, and often does occur. The trophic nerve- 
centres of the enteric mucous membrane are closely contiguous to 
those of the womb ; and those of the pulmonary mucous membrane 
are closely contiguous to those of the mammae : from these facts 
I deduce the probability and explain the occurrence of enteric and 
pulmonary haemorrhage as occasional concomitants of menstruation. 
Holding this hypothesis respecting the origin of simultaneous 
haemorrhages in such cases as those I have mentioned, I have been 
led to treat them by stimulation of the vaso-motor (negative 
motor) nerve centres. This I do by the application of heat on 
each side of the appropriate part of the spine by means of the 
Spinal Water-bag, and with very satisfactory results. And so far 
from regarding such haemorrhages in any sense vicarious, I do not 
hesitate even to put an end, for a time, to the menstrual flow itself 
by means of heat, if doing so should prove a necessary condition 
of arresting the simultaneous bleeding from the bowel. 



SECTION III. 

NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF CASES 
ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 

Case 1. — Mammary, Ovarian, and Uterine Neuralgia ; Head- 
ache ; Singing in the Ears ; Little Fits. 

Mary H., aged seventeen, whom I saw for the first time 
24th February, 1863, was troubled with frequently recurring 
pain in the right breast. She had had this pain, she said, as 
long as she could remember ; the right breast was con- 
siderably larger than the left. She also complained of very 
severe pains in the left ovary, which were increasingly acute 
immediately before the recurrence of the menses. Pressure over 
the painful region caused great suffering. Menstruation, which 
only lasted a day, and which was preluded by headache and 
general feverishness, was accompanied with "fearful cutting pain" 
in the womb. She suffered almost constantly from headache and 
singing in the ears. In her fourteenth year she began to have 
epileptic fits, and had long been troubled, when I first saw her, 
with little fits every day, chiefly in the morning and evening. 
Her feet were habitually cold ; her hands generally so. She had 
a sallow complexion, and was depressed and melancholy. 

She had been an out-patient at the Soho Hospital for Women 
during two years ; then at the Middlesex Hospital upwards of a 
year ; and, finally, at the National Hospital for the Paralyzed and 
Epileptic about nine months : during the whole of this time she 
derived no substantial benefit from the treatment she underwent. 

I treated her by the Neuro -dynamic method ; I also prescribed 
the use of flannel drawers and armlets, abundant physical exercise, 
and the use of aperient pills if the bowels should be constipated. 

The little fits and the singing in the ears ceased entirely in the 
month of March, or within a month from the time the treatment 
began. In May the mammary and ovarian neuralgia had also 
quite ceased ; and the catamenia, which had increased on each 
occasion after the patient came under my care, and which already 



46 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OT" 

continued nearly a week, were preceded by no distress, and were 
accompanied by no pain whatever. Her feet and hands had 
become continuously warm. She had headache very rarely, and 
when it did occur it was very slight. Her complexion had be- 
come much brighter, and her expression much more cheerful. 

The treatment was continued pretty regularly until the end of 
July, when the difference in the size of the two mammge was 
scarcely discernible. After this date the Spinal Ice-bag was ap- 
plied irregularly, and much less frequently, and on the 25th of 
August was discontinued entirely. The mammae then appeared 
to be quite equal. I saw the patient again Nov. 20th, when I 
examined them carefully : neither she nor I could observe that 
the right one was in the least degree larger than the left. 

I saw this patient on several occasions long afterwards, and she 
assured me that the troubles on account of which she consulted 
me had never recurred. 



Case 2, — Uterine Neuralgia. 

Mrs. B., a paralytic, who consulted me April 29, 1863, 
complained of "dreadful pain down the back, and over both 
hips," throughout nearly the whole of each of her menstrual 
periods ; it was most severe, however, during the first three 
days. She did not begin to menstruate until she was eighteen 
years old ; but the flow, she said, was fairly copious. Cold 
was applied along her spine, in one way or another, during 
the whole of the following May and June ; and when the cata- 
menia recurred on the second occasion after the treatment began, 
they were preceded by no pain whatever ; she had " very trifling 
pain " restricted to the back during the first two days, and after- 
wards no pain at all. 



Case 3. — Severe Backache ; " Dravnng-dovjn Pain " in the 
Pelvis; Cutting-pain in the Womb; Continuous Head- 
ache ; Dimness of Sight ; Swelling of the Ahdwnen, Legs, 
and Feet ; Extreme Prolapsus Uteri ; Irregular Menstrua- 
tion ; Menorrhagia ; Profuse Leucorrhcea. 

June 7, 1863, Mrs. M., aged thirty-five, consulted me on 
account of her manifold sufi'erings. Her backache, dragging 
pain in the pelvis, and what she called " a sort of cutting 
pain" in the womb were incessant. She had headache all 
day every day. Her sight was so feeble and dim that she 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 47 

con Id not tell the time by the chnrch clock, which was close to 
her house ; and one object often appeared to her, she said, as 
several. Her abdomen, legs, and feet were habitually swollen, and 
she suffered terribly from prolapsus uteri and leucorrhoea, which 
came on simultaneously soon after the birth of her first child, 
seven years previously. She had had three children ; and, after 
the birth of each, both these disorders seemed to increase. The 
womb had often protruded "quite out" of the vaginal orifice — ■ 
generally after she had used any e.Ktra physical exertion. She 
had many times passed seven or eight weeks without menstruating, 
tlie leucorrhoea being much increased. She had also suffered from 
profuse menorrhagia — what she called "flooding" — on several 
occasions. Her countenance was depressed ; she had a sallow 
complexion, and her appetite was very feeble. She complained 
of great and general weakness : she felt as if she must drop down, 
and had fallen "many a time." 

She was treated solely by means of the Spinal Ice-bag. 

On the 25th of June — less than three weeks after the treatment 
began — the patient reported a great improvement : her backache 
had lessened ; she rarely had headache; the "cutting pain" in 
the womb had ceased ; her vision had become quite clear and 
normal ; the abdominal swelling had nearly subsided ; the womb 
came down much less both in extent and frequency ; she felt al- 
together much stronger ; her appetite had become vigorous ; and 
her complexion and expression had immensely improved. 

Early in July she menstruated freely ; after the menses had 
ceased the leucorrhoea did not recur. The swelling of the feet as 
well as of the abdomen subsided entirely, and all her other trouble- 
some symptoms wholly disappeared. I saw her on the 18th of 
the following November, Avhen she assured me that since the 
early part of July she iiad not been troubled with any white 
discharge, prolapsus of the womb, bearing-down pains, headache, • 
giddiness, or dimness of sight ; that with one exception, when 
she became " unwell " earlier than she ought to have done, she 
had continued to menstruate at the normal intervals, and that 
in all respects she was quite well. 

Comment. — This case will always be invested with peculiar 
interest because it was the first one in which experimental proof 
was obtained of the truth of the doctrine insisted on in my 
writings, viz., that prolapsus uteri and leucorrhoea are most 
effectually and most certainly, as well as most agreeably, curable 
by lowering the temperature of those segments of the spinal cord, 
and of those sympathetic centres functionally related to the 
morbidly affected parts. 



48 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 

Case 4. — Cramps of the Lower Extremities ; Clonic Spasms of 
the Muscles of the Lower Jaw ; Cervical Neuralgia ; 
Dimness of Sight ; Subjective Spectra ; Distressing Cold- 
ness of the Surface of the Body generally, and especially 
of the Feet. 

Mrs. E., aged sixty, consulted me June 11, 1863, when she com- 
plained of extremely painful cramps in the thighs and legs — so pain- 
ful that she never passed a night without getting up at least twice 
to relieve herself by rubbing them. She also complained of a pecu- 
liar and involuntary closure of the lower jaw, sometimes so violently 
as to wound her lip. This spasmodic affection of the muscles of 
the jaw had been experienced several times a day during the three 
weeks before I saw her. She was also troubled with an " aching 
pain " at the top of the neck during the night. Her sight was 
often dim, and frequently she was much afflicted in the night by 
the vision of a very bright light — " brighter than any Bude light 
I ever saw," she said, and with an inexplicable "feeling of 
thorough terror and distress," which frequently compelled her to 
get out of bed and pray to be relieved of it. She complained of 
excessive lassitude and sleepiness in the day time ; she slept 
very little at night, and even when disposed to sleep was often pre- 
vented from doing so by the cramps in her limbs. She had be- 
come thinner than formerly, had a very feeble appetite, and 
although warmly clothed, suffered extraordinarily from cold. Her 
feet were habitually and extremely cold. There was decided 
tenderness of the spine between the scapulae. 

She had ''always been a crampy subject." For more than 
twenty years she had always been cold to the touch, she said, 
even over the shoulders and bosom, in spite of being well clothed. 
Two years before she consulted me she suffered from neuralgia in 
the ball of the eye ; since then frequently from neuralgia in the 
face, which on the last occasion continued two months, and ceased 
about a fortnight before I saw her. 

She was treated by means of the Spinal Ice-bag. I also pre- 
scribed the following medicines : — 

R Hydrargyri chloridi, gr. j. ; Ext. colocynthidis, gr. iij ; Ext. 
hyoscyarai, gr. i| ; M. ft. pilula alternis noctibus sumenda. 

R Infusi calumbse, § j. ; Ferri et quin» citratis, gr. vii. 
bis die. 

At the end of the first week of treatment she reported that she 
had scarcely any cramps at all ; that the feet had become con- 
stantly warm — warmer than she had ever felt them in her life ; 
that the involuntary closure of the jaw and the pain at the top 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PEINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 49 

of the neck had ceased ; that her vision had become much 
clearer ; that she had not once seen the " Bude light ; " and 
that all her feelings of mental distress in the night had gone. 

The patient continued the use of the Spinal Ice-bag as pre- 
scribed, but without taking any medicine after the first week, 
until July 8th, and after the cessation of the treatment she con- 
tinued, with the exception of an attack of diarrhoea, perfectly 
well, and wonderfully warm all over. She was so astonished with 
the change in the temperature of her body, and by the subsidence 
of every symptom from which she suffered, that she called, July 
15th, simply to show herself in evidence of the efficacy of the Spinal 
Ice-bag as applied in her case : certainly, considering the tempera- 
ture of her body before the treatment commenced, the various 
symptoms of which she complained, the short time which the 
treatment continued, and the length of time the surface of the 
body had continued warm since it was left off, the result is asto- 
nishing. The skin was healthily moist as well as warm, and the 
patient was quite sure that she saw " very much clearer indeed " 
than she did before the treatment began. 



Case 5. — Headache; Talking vjMle Asleep ; Backache; Neu- 
ralgia of the Right Thigh and Knee; Cramps in the 
Hands and Feet ; Spasmodic Contraction of the Miiscles of 
the Hands and Feet ; Uneqiial Development of the Mammae 
attended hj Pain in the left one. 

M. R. J., a girl, aged thirteen, whom I saw for the first 
time June 15, 1863, complained uf headache, which came on 
when she rose in the morning and lasted nearly half the day about 
four days out of seven. The pain was chiefly in the temples. 
She had very disturbed, restless nights, often started, and habi- 
tually talked "nonsense," her mother said, in her sleep. She 
also often suffered great pain at the bottom of the back, down 
the front of the right thigh, and in the right knee. She was fre- 
quently troubled with cramps in the hands and feet : they were 
most severe on the right side, and were increased in the hands 
when she held small things, especially a pair of scissors. The 
common extensors of the hands and feet were spasmodically con- 
tracted. The left pupil was considerably larger than the right. 
The feet were habitually cold. Bowels regular. Pulse 96. The 
patient had been in the habit of walking in her sleep, her eyes 
being open and quite fixed meanwhile. Her mother formerly 
suffered from epilepsy, her sister was then afflicted with that 



,'•: 5Q NBURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 

^* J — , diseaee^ and one of her brothers had " dreadful fits " while cutting 
3* ^ his liesth, and had also walked in his sleep. 

2 Sfe V^-s treated by the Neuro-dynamic method, and in addition 

I I prescribed the following medicine : — R Potassii iodidi, gr. ij. ; 

ammonii bromidii, gr. iij. ; ex aqua bis die. 
X ^V The 'effect of the Spinal Ice-bag was immediate : during the 
T>i — first yeek of its use her headaches became less frequent, and 
"^ ^i^ when.'' they recurred they ceased earlier in the day than formerly ; 

^jyr bujl/after the first day of treatment the pain in the back, thigh, 
— ^id knee, and the cramps in her hands and feet had ceased en- 
tirely. The appetite was improved, and the pupils had become 
nearly equal. During the nights she still coutinued about as 
restless as before. At the end of the second week of treatment 
she became quite free from headache, and both started less, and 
talked less nonsense, in her sleep. The inequality of the pupils 
had become so slight as to be almost imperceptible. On July 13th 
she said she felt quite well in all respects, and her mother re- 
ported that she was " merrier and better a great deal ; " but her 
sleep had not yet become healthy, though her restlessness and 
the amount of "nonsense " she talked in the night had " steadily 
lessened." 

August 4th, her mother said, — " She talks very little nonsense 
now," and reported that she continued free of all the other 
symptoms formerly complained of, and that her appetite was 
" wonderfully improved." At that date, however, she complained 
of a rather hard, painful swelling in the left breast. When her 
dress was opened, I saw, for the first time, that though the left 
mamma was very considerably developed, the right one was, as 
her mother said, " a mere piece of skin — quite flat." I ordered 
the medicine to be discontinued, the Spinal Ice-bag to be used as 
before, but to be inclined to the right side of the spine between 
the scapulae, and the application of heat to the corresponding 
part on the left side several times a day. 

The patient said, September 7th, that the hot water bag was 
soothing and very agreeable, and that the pain and tenderness of 
the left breast were lessened ; and her mother remarked that the 
" nonsense " was " all but over." The same treatment was con- 
tinued until October 13, 1863, when the mammae, chiefly by the 
development of the right one, were so nearly equal that the dif- 
ference between them was scarcely distinguishable. The left one 
was no longer either hard or painful. The pupils were equal. 
The patient had passed many nights without talking in her sleep 
at all ; and as in all other respects she was in perfect health, the 
treatment was discontinued. 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 51 



Case 6. — Uterine Neuralgia; Deficient and Irregular Men- 
struation ; Epilepsy ; Partial Dementia. 

Miss C. A., aged twenty-eight, first seen by me June 
30th, 1863. She suffered extremely during at least two days 
immediately before, and during the whole of each menstrual 
period. Her mother said, — "She is doubled up with pain." 
She had never been regular as to time or quantity : had 
often gone two months without being unwell, and during 
the preceding half year the menses had recurred about 
every sixth week, and had lasted about three or four days, the 
discharge being very slight-^" often a mere show.'' She did not 
begin to menstruate until she was twenty-one. The patient had 
suffered from epilepsy ever since she was two years old. Her 
mind was much impaired : she was quite childish, and had long 
periods of " sulkiness," or semi-stupor, when, as her mother said, 
she was " sickening for her fits." She never menstruated without 
having a considerable number of violent fits, which either pre- 
luded, accompanied, or closed each period. Her bowels were 
habitually constipated, and her feet were '^ always cold." In 
the hope of deadening her pain at her periods, and of bringing 
on or increasing the discharge, her mother gave her hot gin-and- 
water on each occasion. 

I requested that the gin-and-water should be entirely omitted, 
and treated her by means of ice. She was under my care four 
months, during which she menstruated five times. During the 
third time she had very much less pain than ever before, and 
during the fourth and fifth times none whatever. On the fifth 
occasion the menses were copious. Her bowels became open daily 
without the aid of aperients, and her feet became quite warm, 
so that, as her mother said, there was " no longer any occasion to 
put them in hot water." The fits gradually became less in num- 
ber, much shorter, and less severe ; and on the third occasion the 
patient, for the first time in her life, menstruated without having 
a single fit. 

Case 7. — Painful and Deficient Menstruation ; almost Con- 
tinuous Pain of the Right Eye, and Constant Headache ; 
Severe Epilepsy ; Habitual Constipation ; Excessively 
Frequent Micturition ; and Eeucorrhoea. 

W. E., a girl, aged eighteen, who was admitted into St. 
Thomas's Hospital, July 30, 1863, suffered intense uterine 
pain of a " cutting or griping " kind, together with back- 



52 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 

ache^, preceding and during the whole of her menstrual period. 
She could not stand, she said, because the pain was so 
dreadful. She had " terrible headaches every day, and nearly all 
day long," and almost continuous pain at the upper part of the 
ball of the right eye. 

She usually had a severe epileptic fit about once a fortnight ; 
but during the three months immediately before she came under 
my care she had had no large fit. She was aflicted with terrific 
"shakings," which consisted of sudden and violent jerks, some- 
times of her arms, sometimes of her legs, and sometimes of her 
whole body. They often threw her down as if she were electrified. 
They seemed to her to proceed " from the waist and head ; " she 
felt many times a week as if she had a tight string round her 
head ; when this seemed to give way she fell down, and then felt 
as if grasped tightly round the waist. She fell down two or three 
times a day, but the number of jerks she had without falling was 
very great. She was most troubled wiih them early in the morn- 
ings, when they often occurred in continuous succession during 
an hour at a time. They recurred daily, except during the two 
or three days immediately following that on which she had had a 
large fit. During her " shakings " she generally retained her 
consciousness. Often when they were unusually severe her face 
and body were swollen. 

Her vision was impaired : with the right eye she could only 
read test-type No. 3^, and with the left, test-type No. 2h. She 
could not distinguish objects or recognise persons at a moderate 
distance from her. If she read, her eyes became suffused with 
tears ; and on dark or dull days she could scarcely read at all. 
Both her pupils were remarkably large, and contracted very 
slightly in the presence of light. She complained that her eyes 
were gradually getting worse. 

Her bowels were usually constipated — often confined three or 
four days together. She always passed water during her " strong " 
fits, and habitually with abnormal frequency. The catamenia, 
which lasted about four days, were very scanty — " poor." She 
was troubled with habitual leucorrhcea, which was increased by 
warmth or a violent access of '' shakings." She was generally 
very Avarm, often flushed, and troubled with what she called 
" wet-heat ; " her back and hands were especially hot. 

The patient was a "seven months' child." She had her first 
fit — a long one — when she was about three years old ; she had a 
second about two years afterwards, and from that time she had 
usually had a strong fit about once a fortnight. The " shakings " 
came on about five years before I saw her. 

She had been an in-patient of Middlesex Hospital upwards 
of four months, and out-patient at St. Georg^i's Hospital several 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 53 

months, and also an out-patient at the National Hospital for the 
Paralysed and Epileptic between two and three years. 

My treatment of this patient at St. Thomas's Hospital began 
August 7th, was continued until the end of October, and was 
solely by means of the Spinal Ice-bag. The following is a record 
of the changes which took place : — 

Dysmennorrhoeal Pain. — She began to menstruate Sept. 11th, 
and again Oct. 8th. Immediately_ before, and during each of 
these periods, she experienced no pain whatever. 

Headache. — This gradually lessened, and, Sept. 22nd, finally 
ceased. 

Aching of the Right Eye had quite ceased by the end of 
Augast. 

Large Fits.— Aug. 12th, 1 ; Sept. 5th, 1 ; Sept. 25th, when 
ice was not being applied, 1. None afterwards. [On Sept. 19th 
the ice was ordered to be omitted until the patient should be 
clothed in flannel ; this having been done, it was resumed. The 
ice was re-applied Sept. 26th.] 

" Shakings " or Jerks. — Of these the patient had an aggregate 
of 330 during the twenty-three days of treatment in August ; 
during the twenty-four of September in which they still con- 
tinued she had only 230 ; and on Sept. 24th they finally 
ceased. 

State of the Eyes. — Sept. 24th lachrymation had quite ceased ; 
the pupils were contracted to their normal size ; the eyes felt much 
stronger, and she could see distant objects much more clearly 
than formerly. Oct. 22, the pupils continued normally contrac- 
tile, and the visual power had so improved that at that date she 
could read test-type No. 1^ with each eye. 

The Bowels gradually became increasingly more active, and 
after Sept. 29th they continued to be opened regularly each day. 

Micturition ceased to be abnormally frequent. 

Catamenia. — The sanguineous secretion which recurred Sept. 
11th was scanty as usual ; but on the 13th and 14th "a great 
deal of white stuff" was discharged ; and the flow which recurred 
Oct. 8th was quite healthy in respect to both quality and 
quantity. 

Leucorrhcea. — This ceased entirely after the second menstrual 
period. 

General Health, — Before the patient left the Hospital, Nov. 5th, 
she had quite lost the feeling of being swollen either in her face 
or body ; the flushings, as well as the '' wet-heats," had ceased to 
trouble her ; and she expressed herself as feeling in all respects 
quite well. 



54 EEUKO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 



Case 8. — Cramps and Coldness of the Lower Extremities, 
associated with Diahetcs. 

John Dawson, aged twenty, farm labourer, was admitted 
into Guy's Hospital, Sept. 3, 1863, nominally under the care 
of Dr. Owen Eeed; but, owing to his absence, Dr. Wilks had, 
in the first instance, charge of the patient. The patient believed 
himself to have been quite well seven months previously, when 
he first noticed an increase in the quantity of his urine. From 
that time he had gradually become weaker, and had been losing 
flesh. Wlien admitted into the hospital, he suffered severely from 
cramps in the legs down to the toes inclusive. His feet, especially 
when he lay down, were usually cold ; the skin of his hand was 
peculiarly hard and dry ; his tongue was beefy-red ; his bowels 
were fairly open ; and his jDulse was 80 per minute. During the 
five days he was in the hospital before he was submitted to treat- 
ment of any kind, the average quantity of urine voided daily was 
18 pints, the specific gravity being on one occasion 1041, and on 
another 1033 ; he was extremely thirsty, and had a voracious 
appetite. Dr. Wilks allowed me to treat the patient by means of 
the Spinal Ice-bag, which was applied along the whole spine, until 
the lower extremities had become warm and free from cramps ; 
and afterward it was restricted to the upper half of the spine. 
The patient had ordinary diet, ate what he liked, and took no 
medicine. The treatment, which began Sept. 3rd, ended Oct. 19, 
1863. 

Early in September the cramps ceased entirely, and speedily 
after their cessation the feet became completely and permanently 
warm. The patient's skin became soft and moist, and both his 
hunger and thirst steadil)?- lessened. During the period of treat- 
ment the pulse averaged 90 per minute, and the quantity of urine 
voided daily was as follows : — 

Sept. 



4 


17 


pints. 


Sept. 23 to 26 incl. 


11 pints, 


5 and 6 


17i 


>) 


„ 27 - 


lOj ,3 


7 - - 


17 


5, 


„ 28 to Oct. 1 incl. 


10 „ 


8 


16 


33 


Oct. 2 to 5 incl. - 


9i ,3 


9 to 11 incl. 


15i 


33 


„ 6 and 7 


10 „ 


12 


14| 


33 


3, 8 - - 


9i ,3 


13 


14 


33 


„ 9 and 10 


9 33 


14 to 17 incl. 


13 


33 


„ 11 to 14 incl. - 


8* 3, 


18 no report. 






„ 15 to 17 incl. - 


8 „ 


19 


12 


33 


„ 18 - - 


n „ 


20 to 22 incl. 


lU 


33 


3, 19 - - 


7 „ 



The specific gravity of the urine averaged during the month of 
October was 1031. 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 55 

Simultaneously with the great and rapid diminution in the 
quantity of urine voided, the patient regained his wonted health 
and strength, and on Oct. 20, without permission from Dr. Eees 
or myself, he left the hospital, notwithstanding that the " sister " 
who attended him urged him to wait till he had seen one of us. 
He said he was so much better it was useless for him to stay any 
longer. I never saw him again. 

Case 9. — Dtjsmenorrhmd Pain ; Deficient Menstruation ; 
Coldness of the Feet; E^pilepsy. 

G. A. M., aged twenty-two, came under my care Sept. 
29, 1863. She suffered " pinching, drawing pain " during the 
whole period of menstruation, and generally during one or two 
days previously. The menses, which recurred regularly, were 
scanty ; the patient's feet were habitually cold ; and she had 
epileptic fits — generally about three each month. She was 
treated by means of the Spinal Ice-bag, and took the following 
medicine : — 

Ammonii bromidii, potassii bromidii aa, gr. v., in a wine-glass- 
ful of water twice a day. 

On the 25th of October she began to menstruate : during the 
first and second day the flow was much more copious than it had 
been previously, while the pain experienced was very much less 
than she had usually felt. She reported, Nov. 2, that her feet 
had become continuously warm, and at that date she had passed 
six weeks without having a fit. The menses recurred Nov. 29th, 
and continued about a day longer than they had done formerly. 
She had no pain before the discharge came on ; as soon as it had 
appeared, she had pain during two or three hours only, and none 
whatever afterwards ; and she had no fit. Always, except on 
the last three occasions, she had had fits during her catamenial 
periods. Jan. 5, 1864, I was informed that the menses recurred 
on Dec. 31. She said, — " I had no pain at all, except a few pains 
in my stomach," and her period again passed without an epileptic 
attack. But though she was improved to the extent mentioned, 
no further progress was made, and the treatment was not con- 
tinued. 

Case 10. — Lumho-abdominal Neuralgia of twenty years dura- 
tion^ associated with Sleeplessness, Nausea, Vomiting, Obsti- 
nate Constipation, and Extreme Coldness of the Feet. 

Miss E., aged about forty, complained January 14th, 1865, of 
extreme pain on the right side of the lower dorsal and upper lumbar 



56 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 

vertebrae, extending laterally on the same side of the back, and 
thence forward to the right hypogastric region. The pains con- 
tinued every day and every night, and had lasted about twenty 
years. Sometimes, however, she had three or four hours' release 
from suffering. The pain was so distressing and wearing that the 
patient was greatly Aveakened, especially by want of sleep, and was 
disqualified from undertaking any regular occupation. During the 
previous three months she had not had a night's rest, and had 
trusted to narcotics for such sleep as she had had. She suffered 
nearly every morning, and frequently throughout the day, from 
nausea, and occasionally vomited "water." Her hands and feet 
were habitually cold, even in summer. The pulse was 94. Her 
menses recurred every three weeks, and lasted about three days 
each time ; she complained of obstinate constipation — her bowels 
never being relieved without the aid of medicines. She had been 
attended by at least five regular practitioners, including an eminent 
London physician, who treated her during eight months ; had 
also tried homoeopathy and mesmerism ; had taken considerable 
doses of quinine ; had bathed in salt water, and had been in the 
habit of wearing, during a long period, a wet bandage round the 
abdomen. 

I prescribed as follows : — Tinct. quinine co., 5ij-;at noon each 
day. R potassii iodidi, gr. j. ; potassii bromidii, ammonii bromidii, 
aa, gr. v., morning and evening. Apply the two lower cells of 
the Spinal Ice-bag during 30 minutes before breakfast, and just 
before going to bed. 

When I saw the patient again, on the 4,th of February, the pain 
" was very much lessened," but she had not yet been a whole day 
without it. The nausea and vomiting had lessened ; her feet 
had become warmer, and her appetite much better ; she had 
menstruated since her last visit as usual. The patient found no 
discomfort from the use of the ice ; but, on the contrary, she felt 
the cold pleasant. I ordered the treatment to be continued as 
before. 

17th February. — The pain had increased somewhat again ; it 
came on daily exactly at the same hour (half-past six p.m.), and 
lasted about two hours ; but, on the whole, she was considerably 
better : she could sleep throughout the night, and had had 
neither vomiting nor nausea during the last two days ; her general 
health, appetite, and spirits had improved, and a stabbing pain 
which she felt sometimes at the heart had ceased ; the bowels 
were open every other day without the aid of aperient medicine. 

March 3rd. — While using the Spinal Ice-bag as last ordered, her 
nose bled, and she had such fulness and pain of the head that she 
felt as if she should go out of her mind. After three days of this 
experience she reverted to my former prescription in respect to the 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES ANB PRACTICE. 57 

use of the bag. The head then became much better, but she 
still had slight headache and a sense of fulness. The neuralgic 
pains were so wonderfully better that she was filled with astonish- 
ment : she had passed an entire day without pain — an experience 
she had not had before for twenty years. The sickness was 
" nearly all gone ;" feet very much warmer — in fact, she no longer 
suffered from cold feet — no more constipation. I prescribed the 
application of the ice morning and night in the lower and in the 
upper half of the middle cell, and requested that she should take 
no medicine. 

April 1st. — She had been many days absolutely free of the 
neuralgic pain. As she remarked, " it might be said to be 
gone." Nausea and vomiting had quite ceased ; bowels " very 
regular indeed." The Spinal Ice-bag had been left off a fevv^ 
days ago ; since then the feet had ceased to be as warm as before, 
and the appetite and digestion had again become somewhat 
feeble. I ordered the ice to be reapplied once daily, and the 
Spinal Water-bag, medium size, temj). i20°, to be applied to the 
cervical and upper dorsal region each night after getting into 
bed. I prescribed at the same time the following medicine : — 
R Infusi. calumbse, §j. ; Potassse bicarbonatis, ammonii bromidii, 
aa, gr. v., bis die. 

I did not see this patient again, but I heard more than once 
from her cousin that she continued well. 



Case 11. — Neuralgia of the Head and Face, loith Swelling and, 
Extreme Tenderness of the Painful Parts. 

March 8th, 1865, I was requested to see Mr. T. H., a 
gentleman about thirty -five years old, who was suffering from 
neuralgia, chiefly of the right side of the head and face. I 
found him, at three p.m., in bed. He was in considerable ' 
pain, which had been continuous from the previous day, and 
which had wholly deprived him of sleep, He also complained 
of headache. The scalp was markedly tender, especially on the 
right side ; the face also ; and both were somewhat swollen. 
During the morning the left side had become invaded. The 
patient also complained of suffering from cold in the head 
— a sort of influenza, with considerable aching of both jaws. 
The head was rather hot ; the forehead was slightly moist ; the 
face flushed ; the pulse strong and full, 92 ; the tongue was thinly 
coated with whitish fur. The malady began about a fortnight 
previously. During its continuance he had been treated by tv/o 
physicians. Various medicines were prescribed, amongst them 
aperients, iodide of potassium, colchicum, cinchona bark, quinine, 



58 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 

and iron. I applied a ten-inch Spinal Water-bag, tempera- 
ture 130° Falir., to the cervico -dorsal region, and ordered it to 
be applied continuously so long as the pain should last. I then 
left him to write a prescription, promising to see bim again before 
I should leave the house, and ordered quinre disulphatis, gr. ii. ; 
acidi sulphurici diluti, Til x., to be taken four times a day. 
Witbin half an hour from the time I applied the bag I returned 
to him, and found him asleep. The pulse had alread)'" fallen 
to 88. 

March 9th, 4 p.m. — I found the patient up, writing a letter. Had 
had no pain since I saw him the previous day, except little threaten- 
ings, which were immediately subdued by the re-application of 
the Spinal Water-bag. Indeed, it was applied pretty continuously 
during the whole twenty-four hours. The tenderness and swelling 
of the scalp and face had subsided ; the headache had ceased ; 
and the countenance, no longer flushed, had assumed its natural 
expression. The patient had slept all night, being only disturbed 
by the refilling of the bag. He said, — " Once I felt sure a new 
attack y\^as coming on, and I began to fear another bad night ; 
the bag was refilled and reapplied, and soon I forgot all about my 
fears by dozing off to sleep. The bag is worth its weight in gold." 
The tongue was covered with a thick white fur ; no appetite ; 
bowels open twice ; pulse (^ after dinner) 84 ; this morning it varied 
from 70 to 75. The patient was requested to aj^ply the Water- 
bag when going to bed as before ; on other occasions only 
if the pain should recur ; to apply the two loAver cells of the 
Spinal Ice-bag during thirfc}^ minutes three times a d-Aj ; to avoid 
wine ; and to omit one of the doses of quinine, taking only three 
in the day. 

March 11th. — Had continued free from neuralgic pain. Had 
only used the Water-bag once — viz., on the night of the 9th, 
when going to bed. It sent him to sleep immediately ; but in 
about half an hour he awoke with headache, and found his head 
very cold. His hands, having been beneath the bedclothes, were 
warm. He removed the bag, and applied one hand to his fore- 
head. The headache speedily ceased. He found the Spinal Ice- 
bag agreeable, and wished to extend the time of its application. 
Pulse 72 ; tongue cleaner ; bowels open, but insufficiently so ; 
urine turbid. He was now requested to omit the Spinal AVater- 
bag altogether, unless the neuralgia should occur ; also the medi- 
cines already prescribed ; to apply ice in each cell of the Spinal 
Ice-bag for forty-five minutes three times a day ; to drink water 
freely ; to take an aperient pill occasionally ; and quinfc disul- 
phatis, gr. ij; acidi nitro-hyclrochlorici diluti, Ti[ xv., bis die. 

April 8th. — Had had no return of neuralgia, and attended to 
his business daily ; but, though fairly well; he was not in robust 



CASES ILLUSTllATIiSG ITS PHIXCIPLES AKD PRACTICE. 59 

health, being troubled with a little flatulence and iudigestion, 
chiefly due, I believe, to having his sleep frequently broken at 
night, in consequence of his Avife's recent illness. I therefore gladly 
concurred in their project of going to the sea-side for a time. 

I have often seen this patient since : he never had any return 
of the neuralgia. 

This is the first case in which neuralgia of the face and scalp 
was treated by the application of heat along the cilio-spinal 
region. 

Case 12. — Neuralgia of the Ghcst-ivalls and Extremities, 
associated loith Sudden Convulsifc Jerl:s. 

June 22, 1865, I was consulted by a nobleman, aged forty- 
five, on account of neuralgia affecting different parts of the 
body, the walls of the chest and the lower extremities being 
chiefly involved. The attacks generally came on suddenly, 
and usually lasted about fifteen hours, sometimes longer. 
The pains were of an acute, stabbing, and seemingly spas- 
modic character, and were often brought on by vigorous 
muscular exercise, especially deer-stalking, which the patient 
is very fond of, but which his attacks either cut short or 
prevented him from indulging in. He also suffered not infre- 
quently from ''jerks " or " starts." Though he is not robust, his 
general health. is fairly good. I prescribed the application of the 
Spinal Ice-bag along tlie whole spine during three-quarters of an 
hour twice a day, and ferri et quinse citratis, gr. v., each day 
during a few days at a time occasionally. When I saw this 
patient again, April 27, 1866, he informed me that he applied the 
Spinal Ice-bag as directed during several weeks at a time, at three 
successive periods, since he consulted me. He declared himself 
so greatly improved, that lie had been quite free from his malacly 
for long periods together, that when it had recurrecl, the pains 
had been comparatively slight, that he could continue violent 
exercises, including deer- stalking, without bringing on an attack, 
and that, in his opinion, had he continued the treatment regu- 
larly for a longer time he should have been completely cured. 

Case 13. — Severe Uterine Neiircdgia ; Intermittent Menstrua- 
tion ; Headache; Insufficient Sleep; Pain hetioeen the 
Shoulders; Shortness of Breath ; Cough; Copious Expec- 
toration ; Frequent Ilcemoptysis ; Sickness ; Gonstip>a- 
tion ; Eiarrhma ; Pain, Weakness, and Coldness of the 
Lower Extremities ; Oenercd Coldness. 

Miss B., aged about thirty, suffering extreme uterine pain 

r 2 



GO NEURO-DiNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED: A SERIE.S OF 

during her menstrual periods consulted nie Jun'e 26, 18G5. Before 
tlie flow began the pains came on, and with such terrific 
severity that, as she said, she was obliged "to dance about 
the room." This agony usually lasted about five hours. 
During its continuance the flow stopped completely, and then 
on the subsidence of the pain recurred. Soon again, how- 
ever, pain of less intensity was experienced, and again during its 
presence the flow ceased ; and during about five days these sub- 
dued pains and the flow, which was scanty alternated with each 
other until at length they both finally ceased. During the pre- 
sence of the severe pain she was alwaj^s purged and sometimes 
side. She often suffered from severe headache, chiefly at the 
vertex, but affecting the eyes, which were very painful, and 
which felt, she said, as if she could'nt keep them open. The pain 
vras most oppressive in the mornings AA'hen she was often obliged 
to sit a couple of hours doing nothing ; usually it cleared away 
after dinner. Her sleep was generally very much broken and un- 
refreshing. She had habitually considerable pain between her 
shoulders, difficulty of breathing, cough, copious expectoration, 
and frec|uent haDmopt5^sis. The surface of the chest was very 
5:.'nder, palpation over the front of it caused decided pain. Her 
a})petite was feeble ; during her catamenial intervals her bowels 
■r/ero constipated, and her urine was generally turbid. She suf- 
fered from general coldness, but her extremities were especially 
cold — her feet being the coldest. Her upper extremities were 
remarkably weak, so that keeping them raised or even raising 
them cost her an effort. She was also much troubled with what 
she called "■ rheumatic pains " in both legs. She began to suffer 
about six years previously — dysmenorrhoea being among the first 
of her troubles. I prescribed the application of the Lumbar Ice- 
bag to the lower part of the spine twice daily, and the following 
medicines : — Ferri ammonia citratis, gr. viii., bis. die. Olei 
morrhuffi, 5j-) t)is. ciie. 

July 3. — The patient said she was notably refreshed for about 
an hour after each application of the ice, and became quite warm 
— both hands and feet — in about five minutes after applying it, 
but felt cold again between the applications. Pulse, 92. Treat- 
ment as before. 

July 10. — She reported herself decidedly stronger and better. 
She said, " the arms don't drop as they did." She complained, 
however, of a cold in the head and chest— the coughing and spit- 
ting being increased. Pulse, 108. 

I directed that two teaspooufuls of cod-liver-oil should be taken 
at each dose, that the iron and ice should be continued as before, 
and that she should apply an 8-inch Spinal Water- bag contain- 
ing water at 115'^ to the cilio-spinal region each night when going 
to bed. 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PilACTIOE. 61 

July 17. — The cold in the head and chest had subsided, and 
she had slept better. Pulse, 84. On the 14th, she began to 
menstruate ; the flow began before the pain, and continued along 
with it ; it had never done so before. In fact, the flow was con- 
tinuous until the 16th, when she had no pain. On the 17 th it 
recurred with very slight pain. 

Sept. 12. — The duration of the agonising menstrual pains had 
now become reduced to two hours, and the pains themselves were 
decidedly less severe than foiinerly ; she said, '' I used to dance 
with pain, but I can lie down now." Her difficulty of breathiug 
had lessened, she had gained flesh, her feet were always warm, her 
bowels were open daily, her pulse had fallen to 80, and she kept 
]nuch better than formerly ; she felt altogether better and 
stronger ; she said that after using the ice for half-an-hour she 
became so uncomfortably warm that she could not bear it to the 
end of three-quarters of an hour as prescribed. 

Sept. 26. — Had still a slight hacking cough, and her chest vvas 
still tender to the touch, but the pain between the shoulders vras 
"much better." 

Dec. 5. — The catamenia recurred four days ago ; she had 
pain during only a few seconds at a time, "just a few times 
during the day." The flow continued each day this time. The 
pains between the shoulders had quite gone, and she had 
also " lost all those rheumatic pains " which she had had in 
the legs " for j^ears without anything relieving them." She was 
still gaining flesh, and her muscles had become much flrmer ; 
she slept the whole of each night ; she breathed much more 
easily, and her cough had ceased ; she was still troubled, how- 
ever, with expectoration, which, though much lessened, was 
" yellow and nasty," and sometimes tinged with blood ; she ako 
complained of the flow of " a nasty yellow and palish pink " fluid 
from her mouth during sleep. Pulse 76, full and regular ; tongiie 
clean ; urine always clear, though sometimes very pale. 

April 7, 1866. — The catamenia continued quite regular, and 
lasted four days. During the last two periods the flow had been 
quite normally copious, quite continuous, and without any pain 
whatever ; she had lost her cough entirely for fully two months, 
but in the latter part of March it recurred with considerable 
severity and some hsemoptysis. 

I continued to see this patient — about once a month — until the 
middle of 1867 ; in the beginning of that year she married ; she 
soon became pregnant, and in due time the mother of a "fine 
boy." In 1868 she called upon me to report herself and to thank 
me for the benefit she had received from my prolonged treatment 
of her. Her lungs gradually became healthier and stronger during 
1866-67, and on the occasion of her last visit she was able to 



(52 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 

assure me that she was enjoying very fair health. Slie again 
called upon me (by my request), April Q, 1872, and reported that 
she had continued tolerably well during the interval since her 
previous visit ; her lungs were still delicate ; and she had been 
troubled at distant intervals with hfemoptysis, especially if dis- 
tressed mentally, as she had been some months previously by the 
loss of a child ; but on the whole, her health and strength had 
decidedly increased ; she had had three fine healthy-looking 
children, and with the exception mentioned she was quite free 
from all the symptoms she originally complained of. 

Case 14. — Intense Pain and Tetanoid Paralijsis of the Foi'.r 
Extrcinities ; Diarrluca. 

A boy, aged two ye&xa and four months, was brought to me, 
April 10, 1866, suffering from rigidity and immobility of the 
extremities. Tlie arms Avere stiff, though still partially moveable ; 
the thumbs were forcibly bent within the palms of the hands, 
and the fingers Avere drawn over them and fixed in a state of 
semi-flexion ; the legs Avere extended and rigid, the feet being 
also firmly fixed as in talipes equinus. The child had seemed 
to become rapidly stout. All four limbs Avere swollen ; the dor- 
sum of each foot so much so as to make the skin tense and 
glistening. There Avere also slight ecchymoses on the feet. The 
sensibility was extremely heightened : touching the hands or feet 
caused the child at once to scream ; in fact, he screamed if he 
saAV his feet approached. He also suffered from diarrhoea. 

I ordered the application of ice by means of two ten-inch 
Spinal Ice-bags, one being placed along the spine, and the other 
across the occiput so as to extend from ear to ear, thus forming an 
ice-pillow. The applications were continued about two hours, 
and Avere repeated in the same manner four times each day, during 
the early part of the treatment. Afterwards the applications 
Avere less frequent. The child Avas immediately soothed, slept well 
the folloAving nights, and rapidly became generally calmer and 
better. On the 12th, the fingers had become more supple ; the 
extremities could be freely handled without causing pain, and 
the diarrhoea had ceased. By the 25th, he could AA^alk the length 
of a room, and by the 2nd of May, he was able to walk with per- 
fect ease, and, indeed, had completely recovered, except that there 
was a slight eversion of the left foot, which subsequently disap- 
peared. 

Comment. — The severe inflammatory condition of the spinal 
cord characteristic of this case is one which, so far as I know, is 



CASES ILLUSTRATING IT,=! PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 63 

incapable of subjugation by any of the ordinary methods of treat- 
ment hitherto practised. I regard the swelling and allied symp- 
toms which took place in this child, as an example of preterna- 
tural energy due to excessive nutrition of the intensely excited 
spinal cord. 

During about a month previously to the date when the child 
was brought to me, he had seemed to become generally and ra- 
pidly stout ; so rapidly, indeed, that the nurse felt concerned in 
observing this change, although she had no idea that it was a 
morbid one. As owing to the influence of the ice along the spine 
the extreme spinal hyperaemia became gradually subdued, the 
general swelling of the little patient steadily subsided. 

It is stated above that " there were also slight ecchymoses on 
the feet of the child ; " these, as Avell as the petechite appearing 
in various fevers, in some cases of cholera, and of epilepsy, 
and those together with the larger spots (vibices) so abundant 
in cases of the disease in question as to give it one of its 
many names, I regard as results merely of the intense action of 
those spinal nerves which are related to the elementary cells of 
the several parts of the organism and which preside over their nu- 
trition. I apprehend that the morbid action of those nerves in 
these cases is merely an excess of their normal action, and that 
by this excess they render the elementary cells attractive of blood 
from the capillary system in greater quantities than they can 
assimilate, and thus occasion its effusion in spots, the number 
and size of which are probably proportionate to the vehemence, 
within a given time, of the activity of the nervous" force concen- 
trated at the several points where it thus manifests itself. 
Whether in addition to its action in this way, it also, by its preter- 
natural power, effects a morbid chemical change in the blood imme- 
diately acted upon, is a:i exceedingly interesting question which, 
however, I think science will probably answer hereafter in the, 
negative. But in any case assuming the reality of the cause here 
alleged, it follows inevitably that these sanguineous spots indicate 
no less decisively than do the symptoms already passed in review, 
the wisdom of applying ice along the spine. 



Case 15. — Persistent Pain in the Loins, associated with 

Diahetes. 

C. 0., aged twenty-six, a carman, was sent to me by Dr. 
0. R Drysdale, January 27, 1867. During the previous three or 
four months the patient had suffered almost constant and increas- 
ing severe pain across the lumbar region ; stooping distressed him 
especially ; he also suffered occasionally from headache ; his skin 



64 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 

was dry and rough, and the back of the left hand was nearly 
covered by a large circular patch of diseased skin which was 
thickened into an elevated dry crust of a dark brown or reddish 
colour ; his tongue was red, denuded of epithelium, sore, and 
covered with mucus ; he was voiding about four and three-quarter 
pints of urine daily — urination occurring about every two hours ; 
the urine contained sugar, and had a specific gravity of 1045 ; the 
patient's virile power was greatly impaired ; his hands and feet 
were habitually cold — " in the cold weather very cold ; " the 
bowels were prone to be constipated ; there was marked tender- 
ness along the lumbar and lower dorsal vertebree. The patient's 
attention was not directed to the impairment of his health until 
the previous June ; he then found himself thinner than before, 
and often troubled with thirst. In August he first noticed that 
he was passing a great quantity of urine. 

The patient was under my observation two years ; during 
the first fifteen months of that period ice was applied to his 
spine every day, the number and mode of the applications being 
varied from time to time as having regard to the changes in his 
s3^mptoms and conditions I judged expedient. 

As a full account of this case will be published elsewhere I 
shall give here only a brief statement of the results achieved by 
the Neuro-dynamic treatment to which the patient was submitted. 

The ]pain in tlie loins having gradually and steadily subsided, 
quite ceased in October, 1867, and never recurred while the pa- 
tient was under my care. 

Headache after recurring with decreasing frequency ceased 
altogetlier in May, 1867. 

Tlie state of the tongue rapidly improved; in August, 1867, it 
had become thoroughly healthy both in feeling and appearance, 
and afterwards continued so. 

State of the Skin. — Already by March 10, 1867, the back of 
tlie hand had become completely healed ; by the end of the same 
month the skin of the hands had become much softer and moister 
than before ; and in the beginning of June the skin was covered 
with a gentle perspiration. 

Temperature of the Extremities. — By Februarj^ 9, 1867, the 
feet had become warm ; by May 26, the hands had become 
warm ; and from this date forward a normally vigorous circu- 
lation, denoted by permanent warmth, was maintained in the 
hands and feet. 

Thirst which distressed the patient a good deal had already 
abated considerably at the end of the first week of treatment : at 
the end of March his thirst was so slight that he thought it had 
nearly left him, and from tha^. time forward he ceased altogether 
to be troubled by this symptom. 



OASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PEINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 65 

State of the Bowels. — They gradually became more regular and 
from the end of March forward they were opened every day. 

Virile Power. — This was steadily regained ; he reported, July 
21, 1867, that it had considerably increased : in September he 
said he had erections in the mornings once or twice a week ; and 
again, August 30, 1868, he gave a similar report. 

Quality and Quantity of the Urine. — The urine remained sac- 
charine throughout the whole period of treatment — the specific 
gravity generally oscillating between 1045 and 1035 ; on a few 
occasions it was as high as 1050, and again as low as 1030. 
When the patient came to me he was conforming to Dr. 
Drysdale's prescription, which was as follows : — " To live chiefly 
on meat, greens, and bran biscuits ; to take no stimulants ; 
to refrain from coitus ; to take a great deal of exercise, and 
to have a drachm of cod-liver oil three times a day." Dur- 
ing the first fortnight while the patient was under my care 
exactly the same treatment was continued ; but to this was 
added the daily vise of the Spinal Ice-bag, and at the end of the 
fortnight the amount of urine voided daily was reduced from 
four and three-quarters to three and three-quarters pints. Dis- 
continuing the physical exercise and oil, but continuing the diet 
and Spinal Ice-bag, the amount of urine voided daily was gra- 
dually reduced to two pints and four ounces. Under this treat- 
ment persisted in several months the amount of urine voided 
daily did not exceed this small quantit3^ And so great was the 
healing influence that was exerted by the whole course of treat- 
ment tha,t six months after it was completely discontinued, and 
the patient had lived on ordinary diet throughout that time, the 
amount of urine voided daily did not, as a rule, exceed four pints, 
no one of the other symptoms returned, and the patient expressed 
himself as feeling in every respect quite well. 

Case 16. — Infra-Orhitcd and Dental Neuralgia. 

Fraulein , aged twenty-five, consulted me Februarys, 1867, 

on account of neuralgia affecting the infra-orbital and dental 
branches of the trifacial nerve. The pain was not confined to one 
side of the face, but was sometimes most acute on one side, some- 
times on the other ; it increased at night, and kept her awake the 
greater part of each night. She had been suffering in this way 
during about three weeks before I saw her. Her general health 
was good. The affected parts presented no trace of hyperseinia. 
I directed that the Spinal Ice-bag should be applied close to the 
occiput and along the cervical and the upper five or six dorsal 
vertebrae during an hour each night. It was thus applied during 
a fortnight. The patient experienced almost immediate relief : 



66 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 

after three days of treatment she felt and slept very much 
better ; and before the end of the fifth day the pain had wholly 
ceased. Nearly a year afterwards she told me it had never re- 
turned. 

Case 17. — Crural cmcl Sciatic J^euralgia- of Sixteen Years' 

Duration. 

I was consulted, June 25, 1867, by Mr. — — , aged forty-nine, 
who complained of excruciating neuralgia in the legs. The pain 
was of the ordinary tearing, shooting, and stabbing kind, sometimes 
in one limb, sometimes in the other, and affecting one heel almost 
continuously. This was often so acutely tender that he could 
not bear to touch the ground Avith it. Occasionally, when the 
pain was most excessive, the limbs jerked involuntarily. As a 
rule, the patient suffered most at night, and was thus so habitually 
deprived of sleep, that he marvelled to find his general health 
and strength continuing so fairly good as it was. He said that 
whenever he was able to sleep a little the pain increased. The 
malady came on about sixteen years ago, and had recurred at 
intervals ever afterwards. The intervals had gradually shortened, 
until at last he rarely had an interval of a day without expe- 
riencing some decidedly acute and shooting pain. Until the 
morning he came to me he- liad nev_er been free of intense pain 
for nineteen days. On applying considerable .pressure on each of 
the spinous processes, I could discover no tenderness whatever. 
The brain, lungs, bowels, and bladder were all healthy ; the tongue 
Avas clean ; the pulse 66, and, though rather feeble, steady. The 
patient Avas in the habit of drinking daily about a pint of sherry, 
which I adA'ised him to give up. I prescribed the application of 
a Spinal Ice-bag along the lumbar and the lower half of the 
dorsal A^ei'tebra^ during tAvo hours twice a day (no medicine), and 
advised abstinence from Avine or other alcoholic tliiids. The 
patient did not believe that the}^ exerted any influence on his 
malady, and was disinclined to give up his Avine. J-Ie called upon 
me again July 12th, when he informed me that he had applied 
the Spinal Ice-bag only once a day on an average ; that, "practi- 
cally speaking," he had had no pain since he began the treat- 
ment ; that until the day before his visit he had not suffered at 
all, and then only very slightly from pain beloAV the left knee ; 
and that he had slept Avell. 1 repeated my injunctions respecting 
the use of both the ice and wine, and prescribed potassii bro- 
raidii, gr. viij. ; ammonii bromidii, gr. v., bis die. I advised per- 
SBA'srance AAnth the ice, and abstinence from Avine. The patient Avrote 
to me, August 21st, — "I continue to receive great benefit from 
the ice application, and shall continue it." The pain afterArards 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 67 

recurred in a mitigated form, but was greatly subdued by the ice, 
and, I incline to believe, would not have returned if the patient 
would have abstained from wine. 



Case 18. — Dental NGuralgia. 

A. W. B., a Russian gentleman, aged thirty, suffering from 
dental neuralgia, consulted me in September, 1867. The malady 
was chiefly confined to the teeth of both the upper and lower 
jaw, but no particular tooth or teeth seemed to be especially 
affected. The pain was intermittent, and so severe as to in- 
terfere seriously Avith the patient's daily occupation. No cause 
of the disorder, which had continued some weeks, could be 
discovered, and the face, so far from showing any sign of hyper- 
Eeraia over the seat of pain, seemed cooler than normal. I 
prescribed the application of the Spinal Ice-bag along the upper 
half of the spine, and close to the occiput, forty-five minutes 
twice a day. In the course of the first day of treatment the pain 
was completely subdued ; the use of the cold was persisted in for 
some time, and during the remainder of the patient's stay in 
England he contimied free from suffering. 



Case 19. — Pain and Swdlin;] of the Extremities. 

Sept. 18, 1867, W. G., male, complained of pain in the left hand, 
and in the right knee and ankle, which were also considerably 
swollen, as v,^as also the right hand, which, however, was not painful. 
His tongue was clean, his appetite was good, and his bowels were 
regular. I prescribed in the first instance the application of ice 
along the cervical region. On the following day the hand was- 
already much better. I then directed the apjilication once daily 
of the Spina] Ice-bag along the whole spine till the ice should be 
melted. By this means the pain and swelling were quickly and 
completely subdued. 

In November of the same year the patient had another similar 
attack in the right hand and right knee ; and again by the use 
of the Spinal Ice-bag during three days all pain and swelling had 
vanished. 

In Jamiary, 1868, I saw the patient again : he had continued 
at work during nearly the whole of the intervening period. He 
was much improved in general appearance, and informed me that 
when threatened at any time with an attack he averted it by 
using the Spinal Ice-bag. 



68 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 



Case 20. — Neuralgia over the Right Shoulder, between the 
Seapulce, and along the Right Side of the Chest, together 
vjith a Feeling of Fulness and Heaviness of the Head, 
Headache, ancl Constipation. 

Mary B.^ aged fifty-one, first seen by me November 27, 1867. 
Complained of intense pain over the right shoulder, between the 
scapulae, and along the right side of the chest. During tiie attacks 
of pain, which came on and went away suddenly, the flesh, she 
said, quivered and tingled ; she felt her body bent down as if she 
could not move it for fear of the pain. She began to sufier in 
this way in July, ajid in November the pain became extremely 
violent, and what she called a "thick headache," v.diich she said 
increased whenever she laid her head on the pillow, came on. This 
increased pain she described as " a double weight, a nasty heavy 
feeling." Her right leg was somewhat the weakest. She Ava? 
mnch distressed too by frequent flushes which came over her. 
She had menstruated about four times during the two years 
before I saw her, the last time five months previously, and very 
slightly. She was treated by the application of the Spinal Ice- 
bag along the lower half of the spine during an hour twice a day ; 
infusi calumba), §j., to be taken twice a day, and aperient pills to 
be used occasionally. 

December 4. — This patient reported that after Nov. 28 she felt 
no pain whatever in the thoracic region, and that on the 29th and 
30th she was free from pain of any kind. She said, — " I feel 
better altogether, and can now stand upright ; the weight across 
the shoulders is gone." The bovrels, she added, "have become 
more regular — without the help of the pills." At the time of her 
visit she had, however, some pain in the scapula, and the " thick 
headache," though lessened, had recurred. I requested that the 
treatment previously j)rescribed should be continued. 

December 18. — She informed me that she was quite free from 
pain, except in the evening, when fatigued by her work ; she 
looked wonderfully better, and as she said, she " felt much 
stronger, and not so nervous." She also stated that the " heavi- 
ness of the head and the flushes," though not quite gone, had 
much lessened. Her appetite was good, but her bowels were 
" still rather obstinate." She remarked that the ice did not dis- 
tress her in the least, but that during the last fortnight she had 
only been able, in consequence of her work, to use it during an 
hour each night. I ordered her to continue doing so. 

December 28. — She said she continued free from all neuralgic 
pain, and that her only trouble then was " heaviness of the head, 
fulness and headache, as if all the blood went to the head." I 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. G9 

ordered the ice to be restricted to the lower third of the spine, 
and to be applied during an hour twice a day. 

January 15, 1868. — Still had fulness of the head and flushings, 
but no headache. 

January 29. — Reported herself perfectly free from neuralgia, 
and complained only of rushing of blood to the head, which oc- 
curred some twenty times a day. I prescribed the application of 
ice along the lower two-thirds of the spine during an hour twice 
a day, and five grains of the pill of aloes and myrrh occasionally. 

March 18. — She reported herself quite well, and looked so, even 
the flushing had almost wholly subsided. 



Case 21. — Infra-orMtcd and Mental Nniralcjia., with 
Headaclie. 

F. M., female, aged twenty, consulted me in 1867, when she w^as 
suffering from acute facial neuralgia, the chief foci of which Avere 
the infra-orbital foramen and the mental foramen of the right side. 
The extreme pain came on in fits, sometimes at eight a.m., some- 
times at two p.m. ; but between the paroxysms the face continued 
to ache, and at times the patient had pain at the back of the 
head. She had suffered in this way about a fortnight before 
coming to me, and had had several similar attacks during the 
preceding year. .Judging from the collateral symptoms that this 
was a case in which the use of heat was indicated, I prescribed 
the application of the double-columned hot-water-bag along the 
lower cervical and upper dorsal vertebrae early each morning, be- 
fore the recurrence of the paroxysm, and at any other part of the 
day when the pain threatened to come on. The malady was 
immediately subdued : no distinct paroxysm occurred after the 
first application of heat ; all pain rapidly and completely sub- 
sided, and since that date has never returned. 



Case 22. — Uterine Neuralgia ; Deficient Menstruation; Bys- 
menorrhoeal Nausea, and Vomiting ; Leucorrhosa ; Head- 
ache ; Constipation ; Coldness of the Extremities ; Varicose 
Veins ; Ulceration of the Left Leg. 

Mrs. C, aged twenty-eight, first seen by me December 5th, 
1867, suffered from extreme dysmenori-hoeal pain during the 
whole period of menstruation, which lasted only between two 
and three days, and was very scanty — not more than three nap- 
Irins being needed during a period. She vomited more or less 
throughout each period, and suffered much from nausea. During 



70 NEURO-DYMAMIO MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 

the catamenial intervals she had leucorrhcea. K^he was also greatly 
troubled with headache. Her bowels were ver}^ constipated — she 
often passed three days without action. Her extremities were 
habitually cold — the legs and feet were excessively cold, and their 
veins were markedly varicose. A fev^ weeks before I saw her she 
left St. George's Hospital, where she had been admitted on account 
of an extensive ulceration over the middle and anterior third of 
the left leg. While there the wound was nearly healed. When 
she consulted me it had opened again in the form of several small 
ulcers of about the diameter of a pea on a dark red or purple 
ground, having a diameter about equal to that of the top of a 
tea-cup. I prescribed the systematic use of the Spinal Ice-bag 
and the following medicines : — Ferri et c^uime citratis, gr. v., bis 
die ; pilule aloes et myrrhoe, gr. v., alternis noctibus. 

Experience in this case exemplified in a wonderful manner the 
efficacy of Neuro-dynamic medicine. The dysmenorrhoeal pains 
ceased entirely ; the menses became normally copious ; the nausea 
and vomiting which formerly accompanied them were no longer 
experienced ; the patient became completely freed from headache 
and leucorrhcea ; the functions of the bowels became normal ; 
and the extremities thoroughly and permanently warm. But 
what was especially remarkable in this case v\^as the complete cure 
which was effected both of the varicose veins and of the consider- 
able ulceration of the left leg. The patient was a laundry maid, 
for whom, by request of her mistress, I procured admission into 
St. George's Hosjiital, where she had the advantage of being- 
treated by Mr. Prescott Hewitt. While there, the Vvound in the 
leg lessened so considerably as to become almost, but not quite, 
completely healed ; and being considered sufficiently well to re- 
sume her duties, she was discharged from the hospital. But as 
she had to stand the ^shole, or nearly the whole, of each day 
while at her work, the wound in her leg soon became as large as 
before, and she sufiered at the same time from the other symptoms 
described above. Ker mistress then requested me to treat her, 
and I did so, while she continued her daily work. The great 
increase of circulation produced in the lower extremities by the 
influence of the Spinal Ice-bag effected a complete cure of the 
li'ound in the leg, although the patient teas standing on it each 
day ; whereas with all the advantage of entire rest in a hospital, 
the treatment usually resorted to in such cases, while effecting 
great improvement, did not succeed in healing the wound com- 
pletely, and the benefit conferred lasted only a little longer than 
the patient's stay in the hospital. But, what was still more sur- 
prising and satisfactory, the same " great increase of circulation " 
induced by the Spinal Ice-bag caused a permanent subsidence and 
disappearance of the patient's varicose veins. 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 71 

Oase 23. — Facial and Infra-mammary Neuralgia; Head- 
ache ; Persistent Vomiting ; Dysmenorrhcea and Coldness 
of the Feet. 

December 18th., 1867, Frances Schuler, aged twenty-seven, came 
under my care at the Farringdon Dispensary. She complained of 
painful pressure at the top of the head, and of acute pain over 
the forehead and in the right eye. She described the feeling at 
the top of the head as a "pressure, just like a weight of lead, 
with great biit dull pain." 

Both the feeling at the top of the head, and the acute pain 
over the forehead, and in the right eye, came on in paroxysms. 
During each attack the forehead swelled very distinctly, and she 
felt " as if a string at the back and inside her head were drawing 
her right eye backwards." She shed tears copiously from the 
same eye. Her sleep was much impaired by her sufferings. She 
complained also of infra-mammary pain recurring several times a 
week, and often lasting an hour at a time : sometimes, too, she 
had lumbar paius for a day together. Both eyes, but especially the 
right one, had lessened and sunk. 

She assured me most positively that since childhood she had 
vomited every morning in her life, and that her mother and two 
sisters were affected in like manner. Her vomiting was always 
increased during her menstrual periods. 

Formerly she used to menstruate during seven or eight days, 
and meanwhile suffered much pain in the back and in the womb ; 
but since she had been liable to neuralgic attacks, her menstrual 
periods had not exceeded three daj^ during each of wdiich she 
had needed only one napkin, Avhicli was, she said, very slightly 
stained. Her feet were habitually very cold. I prescribed the 
application of ice along the dorso-lumbar region during an hour . 
twice a day. 

December 28tli. — The patient found that the ice would send 
her off to sleep at any time : the fourth application caused her 
to sleep three hours. The first application relieved her head be- 
fore the bag had been on an hour. After the third application 
the pain in the forehead ceased ; and on the fourth day of treat- 
ment she already felt quite well. The pressure and pain at the 
top of the head, the swelling and pain over the forehead, the pain 
in the eye, the lachrymation, and the infra-mammary pain, had 
not recurred ; she had not vomited since the ice was applied the 
third time. Her feet had become "nice and warm," and she said 
that she felt, on the who] e, more comfortable than she had been 
for some years past. Still, after all pain had ceased it came on 
again at the right side of the back of the head, but was subsiding 



72 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 

at the above date, when I ordered the treatment to be continued. 

January 8th, 1868. — The patient stated that she began to 
menstruate on the 3rd inst., and ceased on the 6th, that the flow 
was rather more copious, and of a rather brighter colour than 
previously. She still used only three napldns, which, however, 
M'ere more saturated than of late they had been wont to be. 

February 15th. — The patient had not been very steady with 
her treatment, and some of the symptoms above mentioned had 
recurred, but with less intensity than before. She was sick 
about every other morning ; she felt again a weight at the top of 
the head, but her forehead no longer swelled as it used to do 
during the previous attacks. She complained of pain at the 
bottom of the sternum, below the left breast and over the left 
ovary. To continue the ice as before, and to take Infusi cinchonse, 
§j., bis die. 

March 4th. — The pain, although variable, had not yet gone 
quite away. However, the patient found herself greatly improved. 
She began to be imwell on the 1st inst., and was still so : the flow 
was more copious, and of a better colour. The forehead did not 
swell any longer. The vomiting, which had tormented her every 
morning of her life, was stopped : but she had still, at intervals, 
a feeling of sickness, and I advised her to continue for some time 
longer the use of the ice, which about a fortnight previously she 
had ceased to use, I never saw her afterward. 



Case 24.— Neuralgia of the Right Side of the Head, Face, Neck, 
and Tongue, and of the Right Upper Extremity, together 
ivith Headache, Sickness, and Coldness of the Feet. 

Mary Ann T., aged forty-four, who consulted me for the first 
time December 28, 1867, was suffering from neuralgia of the 
right side of the head, face, and neck, and along the right shoulder 
and arm, extending to the fingers. The right half of the tongue 
was also affected. The pain, which was exactly limited to the 
median line, was described by the patient " like as if something 
is pulling the flesh off the bone — it's so dreadful, and sometimes 
as if the parts were screwed up in a vice." The most acute pain 
was just above and outside the outer angle of the right eje. At 
this part she experienced dreadful twitchings, which came like 
electric shocks, and made her start fearfully. The focus of pain 
was much hotter than the surrounding parts ; but there was no 
notable lachrymation. The pain was greatly increased by the 
local application of cold. Her first attack came on about four 
years before I saw her ; since then she had had four very severe 
attacks, each in the winter season ; but she had had many smaller 



CA8ES ILLUSTEATING ITS PBINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 73 

attacks generally during the autumn. She had brain fever about 
twenty years before I saw her, and was a great and habitual 
sufferer from headache, from which she was scarcely ever free ; she 
had a feeble appetite, was often troubled with sickness, and com- 
plained especially of coldness of the feet : she said, — " Oh, they're 
dreadful, sir ! I never know what it is to have them warm now." 
She continued to menstruate, but very irregularly ; she suffered 
from profuse menorrhagia, accompanied with "very great pain " 
— was often " unwell " a fortnight together, and during the 
whole time the menstrual pain continued. Notwithstanding 
these various disorders, her bowels were opened regularly each 
day. I ordered the application of ice in a twenty-two inch 
Spinal Ice-bag along the whole spine during forty-five minutes 
twice a day. 

January 1, 1868. — This patient had applied the ice as directed 
five times, but complained that it distressed her extremely both 
in the thorax and abdomen — especially towards the end of each 
application. The neuralgia had, however, greatly lessened ; the 
tongue was much better, and the dreadful twitchings had quite 
ceased : she had had no sickness at all. I then ordered the Ice- 
bag to be wrapped in flannel, and to be applied thirty instead of 
forty-five minutes each time. The patient immediately and 
rapidly improved ; and, January 15, informed me that she had 
not had " a bit of neuralgia " during the whole of the preceding 
week. I saw the patient afterwards, and the pain had not returned. 



Case 25. — Neuralgia of the Four Extremities, and of the 
Left Side of the Chest ; Backache ; Headache ; Excessive 
Irritahility of the Bladder ; Deficient, Intermittent, and 
Painful Menstruation ; Bearing-doivn of the Womb ; 
Leucorrhma ; Habitual Coldness of the Feet. 

H. E., aged thirty-two, a very intelligent woman, consulted me 
on January 4, 1868, at the Farringdon Dispensary, on account of 
great pains in all the four limbs, but most especially in the fingers 
and toes ; of continuous pain in the left side over a fixed spot 
not larger than half-a-crown ; and of a pain which she had had, 
" on and off," for years, between the left shoulder and the spine, 
and in the shoulder itself. She also complained of headache, 
which came on each morning ; and of dreadful, and almost con- 
tinuous, aching in the lower part of the back — so severe, that 
often she could not stand upright. 

She was troubled with excessive irritability of the bladder, 
often involving the necessity of urinating about every five 

a 



74 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED I A SERIES OF 

minutes. This trouble had continued since her last confinement, 
which occurred about eighteen months previously. 

The menses were very scanty, lasting but two days, and needing 
the use of only two napkins. They were preluded by leucorrhoea 
nearly as much, she said, as her " regular discharge," and con- 
tinuing a day or two after it stopped. She also suffered from 
bearing down of the womb, and from habitual coldness of the 
feet. The bowels acted regularly ; there was excessive tenderness 
along the lower half of the spine. 

I prescribed as follows : — R Ammonii chloridi, gr. v. ; Infusi 
calumbse, §j., bis die ; and the application of the Lumbar Ice-bag, 
placing the bottom of it on a level with the fourth lumbar 
vertebra, during forty-five minutes, twice a day. 

January 11th. — The patient had used the ice only four times, 
but she reported the pain in the limbs to be so nearly gone that 
she had scarcely felt it once ; she said she had found the Ice-bag 
unpleasant in the day-time, but a great comfort to her at night. 
I advised her to use it at night only, and to continue the medi- 
cine as before. 

Jan. 18th. — She had borne the ice quite well ; she made water 
then about every hour ; the head and limbs continued clear of 
pain; the pain in the left side was less acute, and sometimes went 
quite away; the pain in the back — her worst trouble — ^^^•as wonder- 
fully relieved. Appetite improved. 

February 5th. — Began to menstruate on the 31st ult. ; the flow 
continued day and night during three days, and was much more 
copious than usual. She used the ice ninety minutes twice a 
day during each of the three days of menstruation without any 
discomfort whatever ; she said her back was wonderfully better. 

Feb. 22nd. — She reported herself on the whole much better : 
she made water less frequently again ; and she added, — " I don't 
have that distressing bearing-down feeling as I did. I feel the 
ice such a relief and refreshment for several hours after I have 
used it." 

March 14th. — She had not used the ice during the previous ten 
days ; she continued, however, quite free from neuralgia ; she 
had suffered from a little cough for about a fortnight. On the 
8th March she had slight htemoptysis (while in church), and 
again on the 13th. She felt a fulness of the chest at the right of 
the lower part of the sternum. She then told me for the first 
time that she spat blood twelve years ago. Pulse feeble and 
irregular. I prescribed — Acidi nitrici diluti, Tf{,x. ; Quinee di- 
sulphatis, gr. j., ter die. 

March 28th. — The patient continued free from neuralgia ; 
haemoptysis had not recurred, and the cough had subsided. 

May 6th. — She remained free from all pain ; she had men- 



OASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 75 

struated a few days previously, and she remarked that the menses, 
which used to be scanty, intermittent, and painful, were now 
copious, continuous, and painless. 

May 13th. — The patient had had no recurrence of pain of any 
kind. The leucorrhoea, which formerly preceded menstruation, 
had quite ceased to do so; and all the other symptoms, on 
account of which she consulted me, had subsided. At this date 
the patient reported herself well, and therefore ceased attendance 
at the Dispensary. 

October 28th, 1869. — She came again in order to obtain advice 
for her child. She looked extremely well, and said that she had 
had no relapse, and that she had never enjoyed such excellent 
health for many years as she had done since May, 1868, 



Case 26. — Dental Neuralgia, 

H. E., female, aged twenty-one, suffering from violent pain, 
spreading over the teeth and gums of both the upper and lower 
jaw, consulted me January 17, 1868. The pain was most intense 
in the lower jaw, and on the left side. She had headache also. 
The forehead and cheeks were notably hotter than normal, and 
the patient complained of great heat in the roof of her mouth, as 
well as in her gums, which were swollen and sore. During the pre- 
vious week she had had several teeth stopped with gold, and one 
of them — the left upper incisor — subsequently became most espe- 
cially painful, with swelling, and threatenings of an abscess at its 
root. I prescribed the application of a ten-inch Spinal Ice-bag 
across the occiput. The pain was annulled on several occasions by 
this treatment. But the tenderness of the incisor tooth just men- 
tioned persisted, and the new stopping in it kept up and increased 
the irritation. The pain throughout the whole of the parts de- 
scribed came on in the same way as before, but more violently ; now 
the re-application of the Spinal Ice-bag across the occiput failed 
to subdue it, and it became intolerably violent. In despair, the 
patient tried the application first of cold, and then of heat, directly 
to the seat of pain, but without obtaining any relief. On the 
19th, Sunday, finding her in this state of extreme suffering, and 
knowing that she could not on that day go to the dentist and 
have the stopping taken out of the tender tooth, I applied a 
double-columned Water-bag, containing water at 120° Fahr., 
over the cilio-spinal region. The first application lessened the 
pain, and the second took it away. The patient's previously hot 
and aching forehead became perceptibly cool and moist mean- 
while, and she felt a strong inclination to sleep. During the 

G 2 



76 NEUUO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 

second application she remarked that the inside of her mouth had 
become much cooler, and the temperature of her cheeks fell so 
much that they felt cooler than normal. This was about 9 p.m., 
and she continued free of pain about two hours. Eating her 
supper brought it on again, when it was again subdued by the 
bag as before. About twelve o'clock she went to bed, and, as I had 
requested, applied the Spinal Water-bag by lying upon it. She soon 
went to sleep on the bag, and continued sleeping between three 
and four hours, after which the pain recurred. She applied heat 
again, as before, and again slept about an hour. She was then 
awoke by a fresh attack of pain, which seemed worse than before, 
and which continued till daylight, when she got the Water-bag 
refilled, and again applied it. It quickly soothed her, and enabled 
her to sleep ; and when she awoke she was free from pain. In 
the course of the day she went to the dentist, who, instead of un- 
stopping the tooth mentioned above, stoj^ped three others. The 
patient's sufferings were afterwards aggravated ; and in the even- 
ing of the same day I prescribed the continuous use of the Spinal 
Water-bag (at 120° F.) to the cilio-spinal region, and simulta- 
neously the application of a Spinal Ice-ba,g across the occiput, or, if 
found more soothing, over the seat of pain. I also prescribed a 
drachm of sulphate of magnesia, to be taken at bed time. The 
patient obtained almost complete freedom from pain during the 
evening, when using the cold and heat together • but soon after they 
were omitted she was reminded that her enemy was only at bay, 
and feared fresh attacks during the night. She therefore re-applied 
the Spinal Water-bag, and lying upon it after going to bed, soon 
fell asleep, slept all night, and woke up the next morning quite 
free of pain. By immediate recourse to the same treatment, 
modified as seemed desirable, whenever the pain came on again, 
its tendency to recur was at that time subdued, notwithstanding 
the fact afterwards ascertained that an abscess was being deve- 
loped at the root of the left upper incisor tooth. Ultimately this 
tooth was unstopped, the pus escaped, and the pain, which had 
been reflected on to the sound teeth of the lower jaw, did not 
then recur. 



Case 27. — Neuralgia of the Hands and Feet ; Numbness 
and Partial Paralysis of hoth Hands; Hccmorrlioids ; 
Coldness of the Body generally, and of the Loiver Ex- 
tremities especially. 

A. W., male, aged fifty-six, first seen by me January 20, 1868, 
when suffering from severe pain in both hands and both feet. He 
also complained of numbness in both hands. The pains which 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRmCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 77 

were restricted to the hands and feet were of a shooting character, 
and came on with astonishing suddenness — often, the patient 
said, as if he had received "a violent blow upon the nerves." The 
pains were quickly induced by motion of any one of the four 
limbs. Pains shooting to the tip of the little finger, and some- 
times along the ring finger were immediately produced if pressure 
were made on the ulnar side of the dorsum of either hand. 
Pressure on the radial side of the dorsum of the left hand pro- 
duced pain in the forefinger. The pain in the feet began at the 
metatarso-phalangeal joint of each big toe and flew upwards as 
far as a little above the internal malleoli. Stretching out his leg, 
for example, when putting his trousers on caused the patient acute 
pain in the feet. The hands had become weakened as well as 
numb : he could only extend his left hand partially, and his 
fingers were so weak that he was disabled from doing his usual 
work on that account alone ; but, in fact, he suff"ered such severe 
pains and so constantly when moving his limbs, especially if he 
made any efi"orfc, lifted anything requiring the slightest strain, or 
even suddenly twisted the hands slightly that he was almost dis- 
abled from continuing at his employment — that of a piano-maker. 
He began to sufier in this manner about ten months before he 
consulted me. The pains came on in the hands first, and in the 
feet a few weeks afterwards. 

He did not suffer from headache ; could stand equally well, 
and for a considerable time, on each leg, and there was no ten- 
derness in any part of the spine. Pulse, 75 ; bowels open daily. 
He was troubled with hsemorrhoids which had continued " fifteen 
or twenty years." Reproductive organs healthy. He suffered 
very much, he said, from general coldness, and had become more 
" chilly " than he used to be. His feet were often cold for a 
couple of hours after he went to bed, he " could hardly sleep for 
them." The sensitiveness of his hands as well as his visual power, 
was much below the normal standard. In the right palm he 
could not feel the two points of the sesthesiometer until tney were 
eight lines apart, and not until they were twelve lines apart in 
the left. Without glasses he could not read smaller test-type 
than 5 J with either eye. 

Eighteen months before he consulted me he became a teeto- 
taller ; previously he had been in the habit of drinking freely. 
Possibly, this habit may have contributed, at all events, to origi- 
nate his neuralgic malady, and probably domestic misery, of 
which his wife's habitual drunkenness was an element, may have 
operated as its exciting cause. 

The patient was sent to me by another physician who had 
treated him by means of drugs but without avail. I prescribed 
no medicines at all, but treated him exclusively by means of the 



78 NEUBO-DYNAMIG MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 

Spinal Ice-bag, which owing to the presence of heemorrhoids had 
to be applied with especial care. 

January 29. — The pains in all four limbs had already much 
lessened, and pressure in each hand caused only very slight pain 
— scarcely any in the left hand. He could move his hands vio- 
lently without producing any pain at all. The pain in the right 
foot had shifted from the inner to the outer side, and the motion 
of stretching out his legs — when putting on his trousers for 
example — caused him only " very slight pain, indeed." He said, 
" I've become generally warmer all over, just as I used to feel 
several years ago ; directly I put the ice on, my feet become 
warm, warmer than I can get them by the fire." The tingling 
in his hands had lessened, and their sensitiveness has considerably 
increased. In the left palm he had become enabled to feel two 
points at four lines apart, and in the right at only three lines 
apart ! He could read test-type 4^, though with some 
difficulty. 

February 13. — The pains were still more lessened and were 
shifting about. He could thrust out both hands and both legs 
violently without producing any pain at all. His hands, espe- 
cially his fingers, had become much stronger as well as more sen- 
sitive, a beneficial change proved to him he said by the fact that 
he could scrape the top wood of the grand pianos far more efiec- 
tively than he had been able to do for months previously. He 
said, " 1 continue to keep quite warm : while watching outside 
Broadwood's premises on a very cold night I was very warm all 
night," whereas previously, as he assured me, when watching on 
less cold nights and in just the same clothes he was very cold. 
Could read test-type 4^ easily, and 3i with difficulty. 

Feb. 27. — The patient reported, "There is not the slightest 
pain anywhere while I remain still ; I never feel it." He could 
now extend the left hand vigorously and completely. He con- 
tinued warm, 

August 5. — At this date the patient informed me that the pains 
in all four limbs had gone and were not now inducible by move- 
ments. His thumbs had become much stronger, the re-acquired 
sensitiveness of each hand had continued j he ate well, and he 
slept " a great deal better " than formerly. I then prescribed — 
Ferri et quinge citratis, gr. iv., bis die. He had continued the use 
of the Spinal Ice-bag until this date. I regret that during the 
previous five months I had kept no record of the progress of his 
recovery, and especially that when I saw him at this date I did 
not note the exact degree of his visual power — a point of great 
therapeutical interest. 

April 1, 1872. — I wrote to this patient begging him to call 
upon me, and he did so at this date. He was quite free from 



CASES ILLUSTRATINCt ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 79 

both pain and numbness, and his hands were thoroughly strong. 
He said, " Nothing has ever been the matter with me since you 
treated me except last summer when I had my great toe smashed. 
I went to the hospital and was at work again in three weeks." 
No neuralgia came on. He said that he had ceased to be troubled 
with piles, that the boAvel merely came down a little occasionally 
when he was at the water-closet, but that it was easily replaced and 
caused him no inconvenience. His bowels had acted daily with 
remarkable regularity. He had continued warm all over. He 
began his report of himself in these words: "One very curious 
thing has happened to me, I used to have very cold feet, I may 
call them excessively cold, in bed ; since I've used the ice I never 
have a cold foot ! " 



Case 28. — Neuralgia of the Bach and Shoulders ; Itching 
ami Siuelling of the Hands ; Hcaxlache ; Giddiness^ Cough 
and Cojnous Expectoration. 

January 22, 1868. — Eliza H., aged thirty, married, com- 
plaiued of great pain in the head, with frequent giddiness. She 
had suffered in this way almost every day for some hours, up- 
wards of a month, and both the pain and giddiness were increas- 
ing. She was also much troubled with pain and aching over the 
shoulders — most over the left, also on each side of the lower cervical 
and upper dorsal spines, where there was some swelling and great 
tenderness. She said that she had aching also of the four limbs, 
of the kind caused by fatigue. These pains were intermittent, 
but not periodic. '' At one part of the day I feel," she said, 
"very well ; at another I can hardly move." About three times 
a week for several weeks past her left hand had swollen, and had 
become hot, and red, and numb, — "just as if," she said, "I were 
going to lose the use of it." It was not painful ; but before it 
swelled it itched for a few minutes. The swelling lasted upwards 
of an hour. " It had never been quite right," i.e., it had always 
felt more or less numb since it began to swell. Had a trouble- 
some cough, with copious expectoration. Bowels fairly regxilar. 
Urine pale. Menses healthy. Feet always very cold. I pre- 
scribed the application of ice along the upper third of the spine 
thirty minutes twice a day ; also Ammonii chloridi, gr. v. ; Infusi 
calumbse, §s., bis die. 

Jan. 29. — The cough and quantity of mucus expectorated 
were decidedly lessened. I then requested the ice to be applied 
along the upper two-thirds of the spine, and prescribed Infusi 
calumbse, §j., bis die. 

February 1. — Tlie aching of the limbs had ceased ; the itching 



80 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 

and swelling of the hand had ceased, but had appeared in the 
face and one knee. I advised the application of ice in each cell 
of the 20-inch Ice-bag forty-five minutes twice a day. 

Feb. 15. — Had been unable to provide herself with ice 
during the last fortnight, and was suffering much in the same 
Avay as when she first consulted me. She promised faithfully to 
use the ice as prescribed. R Infusi cinchona?, §ss., ter die. 

Feb. 26. — Had used the ice regularly as ordered. All the 
symptoms complained of had subsided, and the feet were warm ; 
but she complained of great pain over the anterior part of the 
crest of the right ilium. Bowels constipated. There was still 
great tenderness over the cervico-dorsal vertebrse. I requested 
her to apply the ice as before, but from 90 minutes to 120 
minutes twice a day ; to continue the mixture, and to take 
aperient pills when needful. 

March 18. — The pain in the head and giddiness were very 
much better, but had not wholly ceased. The pain and aching 
over the shoulders and each side of the spine, and the aching of 
the limbs were quite gone, the cough and expectoration also. No 
swelling or redness had recurred, and the numbness was no longer 
felt. To continue the treatment as before. 

April 18. — Reported herself well. Feet warm. Treatment 
discontinued. 



Case 29. — Paroxysmal Neuralgia of the Head, Face, Mouth, 
Throat, and Extremities ; Sioelling and Tenderness of the 
Scalp ; Convulsive Tioitchings ; Numhness ; Weakness of 
the Right Side ; Headache, Dimness of Sight, Mentcd Con- 
fusion, and Loss of Memory ; Constipation of the Bowels ; 
Excessively Frequent Micturition ; Defective and Painftd 
Menstruation ; Prolapsus Uteri ; Hcthitucd Coldness of the 
Extremities. 

January 25, 1868. — S. T., female, aged forty, married, consulted 
me at the Farringdon Dispensary, on account of a remarkable 
complication of neuralgic troubles. She suffered from neuralgic 
paroxysms every day ; they were worst in the head and face, but 
involved the four limbs also. The pain of the head was chiefly 
on the right side, reaching to the vertex, and in the forehead. 
She had often acute, throbbing headache, and at the same time 
superficial shooting and burning pains over the scalp, which, 
during the attacks, was notably swollen — especially in the fore- 
head — and very tender. The pain and burning heat often in- 
vaded the roof of the mouth and the throat. During the 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 81 

paroxysms of " plunging, shooting pain," as slie described it, she 
suffered from violent twitchings, which, she said, were " just like 
the cramp," over the right side of the head and chiefly in the 
temple. The pain often extended along the right side of the 
neck, arm, and fingers ; she had cramps in the left hand — ^generally 
once or twice a day, and frequently in the night. When the pain 
passed down the arm, the muscles of the right leg, and especially 
the flexors of the toes, were also twitched or contracted, and the 
leg felt heavy. The left leg was becoming affected in the same 
Avay. The patient said that when she got up in the morning her 
forehead began to swell, but without pain ; that in about an hour 
afterwards the pain came on, and usually continued excessively 
violent during about a couple of hours. Simultaneously with 
the swelling of the foreh ead the sight of both eyes became dim ; 
the dimness lessened when the pain subsided. She said that tlie 
feeling in the roof of the mouth was "like the cramp," that she 
felt a distinct twitching in the right side of it, and that drinking 
warm liquids pained her in that part. She complained that the 
hands and feet were frequently numb. Her sufferings had so 
affected her head, that her mind had become seriously impaired. 
She experienced great mental confusion and loss of memory ; she 
said,—'' I've frequently thought I should go out of my mind 
with my head. I can scarcely recollect anything. I've often 
given people wrong change at the counter (she kept a small shop), 
and trembled so I've not known what to do." She was in the habit 
of sitting for hours without speaking to anybody. When the at- 
tacks came on she disliked her husband and children, and wished 
them away from her. She began to suffer in the head about two 
years before I saw her : the attacks commenced with a burning 
pain at the top, gradually increased in severity, and during the 
previous twenty months she had never, she believed, passed a whole 
day without pain. She suffered from excessive coldness of the 
feet and knees. She found that putting her feet in warm water 
relieved her head. Menstruation was regular, but extremely defec- 
tive and excessively painful. She suffered from prolapsus uteri, on 
account of which she began to have medical advice two years pre- 
viously. She made water about every ten minutes in the daytime, 
and was obliged to get up frequently in the night to do so. This 
trouble had lasted about three years. Tongue fairly clean, bowels 
constipated. Pressure on the spines of the upper cervical ver- 
tebrae caused overwhelming pain, and also a distressing feeling in 
the roof of the mouth and down the throat. When the pressure 
was applied on the third vertebra, it affected the throat lower 
down than did pressure on the first and second. Pressure on the 
lower cervical vertebrae did not cause pain, but there was great 
tenderness between the scapulae, and pressure there caused her 



82 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SEEIES OF 

also to feel the distress in the throat, and induced great faintness. 
I prescribed as follows : — R Misturaa cinchouse, §j. ; potassii 
iodidi, gr. ijss., bis die. Apply ice during forty-five minutes twice 
a day along the lower third of the spine. 

Jan. 29th, — The pain in the head and arm was not quite so 
severe, and the roof of the mouth was better. The patient thought 
her feet "had seemed once or twice to come warm, and they were 
fuller than they had been." Treatment as before. 

February 5th. — The burning pain at the top of the head and 
the pain in the face were less severe ; the pain in the arm and 
the pain and burning in the roof of the mouth and throat Avere 
again lessened, and she had less throbbing than before. I said to 
her, — '" The ice did not make your feet cold, did it ? " " No, sir," 
she answered, " it did not ; indeed, they are rather warmer than 
they were — my hands too ; and my appetite has been very good 
this last week. I have seemed better altogether. I've felt relief 
of the headache in ten minutes after I've put on the ice." I 
advised her to continue its use during sixty minutes twice a day, 
as last ordered, but also to apply an Ice-bag across the occiput, 
from ear to ear, each morning an hour before the attack came on. 

15th. — The swelling, as well as the pain down the front of the 
face, was lessened ; " the cramping pains " of the right arm were 
gone, there being only a " numb feeling" left. The patient found 
that the Ice-bag across the occiput gave her great relief. She 
had menstruated during the previous week, and "more plentifully 
than for the last two years." The flow continued during three 
days, and was accompanied with much less pain than usual. The 
ice was applied along the spine throughout the period during sixty 
minutes twice a day, as usual, and was found to be "a great 
comfort." She said, — " The ice is beautiful. If you are lying in 
bed with the ice on, it's wonderful how warm your feet get ! You 
don't notice it so much when you're up and about. My hands, 
too, are not so cold ; I seem altogether very different." Treat- 
ment as before. 

22nd. — The cramps in the hand were reduced to a "slight 
twitching only : " the patient was now obliged to pass water only 
three or four times a day, and she " very seldom " got up in the 
night to do so. She was requested to continue the ice as before, 
and to take Infusi calumbfe, §j. ; potassii iodidi, gT. ij., ter die. 

27th. — The hands and feet were less numb, and the legs felt 
lighter ; the headache Avas steadily lessening, and the twitchings 
were nearly gone. Yesterday a paroxysm was cut short within 
five minutes after the application of ice across the occiput. She 
said, — "It's wonderful the benefit I've received; I used n't to 
know scarcely what I was doing, — now I am altogether much 
more clear." I advised her to omit the medicine, and to apply 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 83 

the Spiual Ice-bag along the whole spine twice a day during 
sixty minutes. 

March 7th. — The paroxysms, which before treatment came on 
about 9 a.m., had become retarded till about noon. The numb- 
ness of the hands and left arm was much lessened. The right 
hand was well, and there was only very slight numbness in the 
left hand. Before treatment the left leg was both heavy and 
numb from the hip to the foot inclusive : at this date the foot 
alone was numb, and that only while she was walking. She was 
requested to continue the ice as before, and to take Ferri ammonio- 
citratis, gr. iv., bis die. 

14th. — The attacks at this date kept off until 3 or 4 p.m., and 
were less severe than they were a week previously. Bowels regular 
without aperients. She made water not more than four or five 
times in the twenty-four hours. Treatment as before. 

21st. — The neuralgia of the head was still lessening, and the 
attacks did not recur till 4 or 5 p.m. " The womb," she said, 
" is much stronger ; it does not come doAvn as it did." Her head 
continued clearer. She said the ice made her long to go to sleep 
in the daytime, but that her business prevented her. Treatment 
as before. 

28th. — The two previous days had been passed wholly without 
pain ; it was then two years since she had had a like experience. 
Appetite improved; bowels open daily. She said, — "The Ice- 
bag has, I think, regulated the bowels, for they were always 
confined, very often a week together. And I sleep better ; not 
so heavy in the head. I used to be very heavy in the head. 
The numbness has quite gone from the hands." Treatment as 
before. 

April 18th. — She had been several days without an attack, 
" and when one comes on," she said, " it's merely a passing over 
the head, and lasts only about fifteen minutes." She menstruated 
about a fortnight previously, during a full week ; the flow was 
much greater, and the pain much less than formerly. The numb- 
ness in the head was going. R Ammonii bromidi, potassii 
bromidi, ana gr. v., terdie. I requested her to continue the ice 
as before. 

May 2nd. — She was in every respect better ; she had had only 
three attacks during the previous fortnight ; she was stronger^ and 
had better appetite and spirits than she had had for eight years 
before. She remarked, — " I really don't think I shall ever be able 
to do without the ice, it is so comforting." I^ Ferri et quinse 
citratis, gr. v., bis die. Ice as before. 

13th, — Went many days without pain at all in the head — was, 
in fact, " very nearly free from pain altogether." Her mind was 
quite clear, and her memory so improved that she said, " I can 



84 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLiriED : A SERIES OF 

recollect anything now." She had, however, still some temporary- 
swelling of the scalp " most days." All twitching, and nearly 
all numbness, had ceased. The right side, which liad been very 
weak for seven or eight years, seemed, at this date, as strong as the 
left, except when she walked far, or made great exertions. She 
menstruated coj)iously the previous week, and without any pain 
at all. R Syrupi ferri iodidi, 5J-j bis die. Ice as before. 

20th. — She continued quite free from pain : she had passed 
three weeks without having a severe attack. Her sight was greatly 
improved. The numbness was gone entirely, unless when she 
walked. Her complexion, which had been dark and sallow, had 
become remarkably clear, and she looked thoroughly well. She 
said, — " Eeco very from my long illness seems like as if I were 
waking from a dream, for I was scarcely conscious when I came to 
you first." Treatment as before. 

I saw this patient a few times more during the summer. She 
continued free from attacks, and reported her health quite re- 
stored. 



Case 30. — Neuralgia of the Right Side of the Head, Face, 
and Nech, and of the Right U'j^X'er and Loiver Extremity, 
associated with continuous Aching across the Sacrum, 
Partial Closure of the Right Eye, LacJirymation, occa- 
sioned Unsteadiness in Walking, Extreme Coldness of Both 
Knees, Heavy Slee2J, and unduly Frequent Micturition. 

February 26, 1868. — William E , complained of neuralgia over 
the right side of the head, face, neck, shoulder, and in the first 
phalanges of the middle and ring fingers of the right hand ; also 
of twitchings or spasms of the right side of the face and head, 
sometimes almost closing his eye, which, during the paroxysms, 
shed tears. He was also troubled with great, continuous, and 
deep-seated aching in the sacral region. The pain extended along 
the outer half of the thigh, into the right knee, and sometimes 
along the right leg and foot to the toes. He also suffered in the 
right hip-joint, and sometimes in the left. The pain cair.c very 
suddenly in the right knee, and sometimes he was unsteady in 
walking, especially when going down stairs. Both knees had been 
extremely cold during at least twelve months previously, in sum- 
mer as well as in winter. He made water about ten times a day, 
and had a distressing feeling in the pubic region just before 
urinating ; tongue furred ; bowels generally open, but at that 
time rather constipated ; pressure on the third, fourth, and fifth 
lumbar vertebrae caused great pain. The patient began to 
suffer from neuralgia about seven years previously, and had 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE, 85 

had numerous attacks. I prescribed — Pil. colocyntli, cum 
hydrarg., gr. v., p. r. n. ; and, Ammoni chloridi, gr. v. ; Infusi 
gentianse, §j. ; bis die, 

March 4th. — Felt a little better ; but, on the whole, the neu- 
ralgia was much the same : there was no decided improvement. 
I ordered the Spinal Ice-bag to be applied along the wdiole spine 
sixty minutes, twice a day ; the mixture to be discontinued, and 
the pills still to be used when the bowels were confined, 

March 11th. — The patient was completely free from neuralgia 
in all parts of the body, except the left hip and thigh down to the 
knee, in which it had become worse. The bow^els were " very 
regular without medicine." Was passing w'ater only about four ■ 
times a day, and had lost the distressing feeling in the pubic 
region. The knees felt much better. He said, — " I've noticed 
particularly that they've become much warmer." 

I prescribed the application of ice along the lower half of the 
spine sixty minutes, twice a day, and the following medicine : — 
Potassi, bromidi., 5ij- j -^^1- camph., §viij.; capiat., §ss., bis 
die. 

March 25th. — He had now been for a considerable time quite free 
from pain in the arms and legs. The pain in the back, though 
still there, was much lessened. His sleep had become much less 
heavy, and much more refreshing than formerly. He was ad- 
vised to continue the ice as before, and to take ferri et quina3 
citratis, gr. iv., bis die. 

May 9th. — He continued quite free from pain everywhere 
except across the sacrum, where it recurred occasionally, and only 
wdien he sat down. He was requested to continue the ice and 
medicine as before. 

June 27th. — The patient reported that he had used the ice 
and medicine as last prescribed during a week, but not afterwards, 
and that he had continued quite well in all respects. 

Case 31. — Headache; Pain across the Sacrum; Vomiting ; 
Excessive Micturition; Deficient and Intermittent Men- 
struation; Lcucorrhcea ; Constijmiion ; Coldness of the 
Feet. 

Sarah S., aged forty, complained March 7th, 1868, of severe 
and persistent headache ; also of intense pain across the sacrum, 
•especially when she stood or walked. Her stomach was extremely 
irritable : she felt, she said, — " a dreadful sinking at the pit of 
the stomach," and she vomited very frequently, especially in 
the mornings — the slightest disagreeable smell made her vomit. 
Her menses were usually regular as to time, but were very 



86 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 

deficient in quantity, and were intermittent : generally, after quite 
ceasing, they re-appeared in a few days during an hour or more. 
She was habitually troubled with leucorrhoea, with the necessity 
of urinating ten or twelve times a day, and once or twice a night, 
and also with constipation of the bowels. Her feet were " alwaj^s 
dreadfully cold." I prescribed the application of the Lumbar 
Ice-bag along the dorso-lumbar region during an hour twice 
a day ; also the following medicine : — Ammonii bromidii, potassii 
bromidii, aa gr. v. ; Infusi calumbse, §j., bis die. 

March 14th, the patient said, — " I've been quite free from 
headache till to day, and the pain to day is because I have not 
had a bag on. I like the ice very much : it makes me feel quite 
different to what I've felt before." She had not vomited once, 
and had felt no nausea. The leucorrhoea had lessened ; she passed 
water less frequently ; and she was quite sure her feet had become 
warm. Her bowels were still confined. 

March 21st. — On the 14th, 15th, and 16th she used ice only 
once daily. She had headache and was sick early in the morning 
of the 16th ; but had neither headache nor sickness afterwards. 
Still had " a little " leucorrhcea. Her bowels had become open 
daily. I prescribed the application of the ice, till it melted, twee 
a day ; also Acidi nitro-hydrochlorici diluti, TTj, x. ; Quince disul- 
phatis, gr. ^ ; aquae, §j., bis die. 

March 25th. — Had had no headache or sickness whatever since 
previous report. The "sinking at the pit of the stomach was nearly 
gone;" the pain in the lower part of the back was lessened, as was 
also the frequency of micturition ; bowels regular. Treatment 
as before. 

April 18th. — Had had headache once for a short time ; never 
vomited ; " sensation of sickness/' rare ; pain in the back " very 
muchlessened." " I can stand," she said, "a much longer time." 
Menses slightly increased, and of brighter colour ; made water 
about five times a day, and once at night; leucorrhcea still 
lessened ; the feet were decidely and permanently warmer ; and 
she was warmer all over : she said, " I feel myself much warmer 
with the ice on than when it is off." Bowels regular. Treatment 
as before. 

April 25th. — Had had no headache, and no sickness or nausea 
whatever, and was, in every respect, improved since the 18th inst. 
Treatment as before. 

May 2nd. — She had a fright on the 27th ult., and while in the 
consulting-room was trembling — she could not hold her arms 
still ; she became extremely cold and powerless. She had re- 
covered somewhat, but was much shattered. I prescribed the ap- 
plication of ice along the whole spine, sixty minutes, twice a day ; 
also ferri et quince citratis, gr. iv., bis die. 



CASES TLLUSTR/VTING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE, 87 

May 9th. — Was generally better. The trembling had all but 
ceased ; but she still felt "very nervous." The application of the 
Ice-bag along the whole spine produced " pain, and a feeling of 
fulness in the forehead and eyes" each time ; these feelings lasted 
as long as the bag was applied, and came on, she said, " almost 
as soon" as she put it on. I requested her to apply two cells of 
the Spinal Ice-bag along the lower two-thirds of the spine twice a 
day till the ice had melted. [N.B. — She volunteered the state- 
ment that she had tried the Lumbar Ice-bag, and found that it 
caused no pain.] 

May 24th. — Had had no more headache or trembling ; but com- 
plained still of " a sinking at the stomach." I ordered the 
medicine and the ice as before. 

July 8th. — Every symptom of which she complained had now 
disappeared : she reported herself quite well in every respect, and 
the treatment was discontinued. 



Case 32. — Intensely Fainfid Clonic Contrctctions of the Trct- 
2Jesius and Complexus Muscles of the Right Side. 

W. D., aged sixty, came to me on March 11th, 1868, suffering 
from clonic contraction of the trapesius and complexus muscles 
of the right side, which he felt for the first time in the beginning 
of the previous December, and which had been steadily increasing 
since that time. He twisted and jerked his head violently over his 
right shoulder ; he had great pain at the scapular origin of the 
trapesius, and at the occipital attachment of the complexus and 
trapesius ; pressure on the second cervical spine produced extreme 
pain. He had no headache ; bowels open only about twice a week ; 
bladder healthy. I prescribed Pot. brom., gr. viij. ; Inf. calumb.,. 
§ss., ter die. 

March 28th. — The patient was no better. He said that the 
pain was awful, that it continued for hours every day, and that it 
was even extending down the back, and along the left shoulder 
and arm. I advised that ice should be applied along the whole 
spine, quite up to the base of the brain, until it had melted, twice 
a day ; and that the patient should continue to take the medicine 
already prescribed. 

May 2nd. — The pain was much lessened. The patient said that 
he was now often an hour without any pain, even when the Spinal 
Ice-bag was off. The arm was disposed to move ; the pain in the 
shoulder had almost subsided. I requested the Spinal Ice-bag to 
be applied as before whenever the symptoms recurred. 

May 18th. — The patient continued the application of ice up 



88 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED: A SERIES OF 

to this date, wLeu he went into the country. The pain had 
become so subdued that, after having a refreshing night's sleep, 
he rose in the morning without any pain ; some days the pain did 
not recur at all, and when it recurred the application of the ice 
stopped it at once. Since being under treatment, his appetite and 
sleep had improved wonderfully ; and after his return to London 
he reported himself quite free from his malady. 



Case 33. — Headache ; Uterine Neuralgia ; Retarded and 
Deficient Catamenia ; Loss of AjJjJf^tite ; Coldness of the 
Feet ; Extreme General Wcalcness ; and Mental Aimthy, 

E. F., aged nineteen, consulted me March, 18, 1868, when she 
was suffering as follows : — She had headache very often, and for 
many hours together. At each menstrual period she experienced 
such acute uterine pain, that during the first day she was wholly 
incapacitated from doing anything. She began to menstruate 
when she was sixteen years old, and the catamenia recurred in a 
healthy manner only two or three times ; afterwards six, and 
sometimes eight, Aveeks elapsed between her periods, and the flow 
became so slight that she said, " I hardly ever know whether I'm 
imwell or not." Her appetite had become extremely enfeebled, 
and she v/as unable to take any breakfast at all ; her feet were 
habitually very cold ; she had become extremely weak, both 
physically and mentally — in fact, she complained most especially 
of great languor and apathy, of feeling incapable of taking 
interest in anything. 

The patient was submitted to the Neuro-dynamic treatment 
during a year. The only medicine she took consisted of citrate 
of iron and quinine — five grains twice a day, during the month 
of May. On the 25th of March she described herself as feeling 
lighter and better, and said that her feet had become quite warm. 
In April she menstruated during four days — from the 7th to the 
11th inclusive. May 2nd, she reported that she had headache 
only once during several weeks, and that she felt " much lighter 
and more spirited." In May she again menstruated during four 
days — from the 9th to the 13th inclusive, the Spinal Ice-bag 
being used as directed, without causing any discomfort mean- 
while. Her progress continued uninterruptedly : the menstrual 
function became thoroughly healthy in respect to the periods of 
its recurrence, its duration, and copiousness — the latter being 
greatly increased ; she was completely free from both headache 
and uterine pain ; her feet continued normally warm ; she re- 
gained her appetite and natural vigour ; and, on the 27th March, 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ±TS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICfe. 89 

1869, when I last saw her, she said, — " I've come to tell you how 
well I am." She looked, indeed, wonderfully improved, and 
assured me that she felt in all respects quite well. 



Case 34. — Neuralgia of the Head and Face, together with 
Mental Confusion and Depression, occurring chiefly at 
Night, and, including periods of remission, of about Five 
Years' Duration. 

March 28, 1868. — A. J., female, aged twenty-five, complained 
of violent pain in the face on both sides, and in the right temple, 
extending backwards to the centre of ossification of the parietal 
bone. The pain, she said, "shoots, darts, and travels about." If she 
went out at night, it came on when she returned home, and kept 
her awake all night : sometimes it subsided in the morning ; some- 
times it continued throughout the whole day following a bad 
night. The neuralgia was usually associated with headache, more 
or less general, confusion of ideas, mental apathy, and depression. 
The patient described her state during her attacks by the phrase, 
"general numbness in the head." She was in pain while consulting 
me. She said that while her head ached it was cold. She felt 
extremely "sensitive and unstrung" during her attacks, and for 
some time afterwards. Tongue clean ; bowels regular ; menstrua- 
tion normal ; feet usually warm ; pulse 80 — good. The patient 
began to suffer as described about five years previously. At the be- 
ginning of 1867 she had a severe shock from the death of a brother, 
and for several months afterwards her sufferings were almost 
continuous. She was treated solely by the Neuro-dynamic 
method : no medicines. 

April 4th.— She reported that she had had no neuralgia since, 
she began to use the ice — on which, almost every night, she had 
fallen fast asleep. On returning home one night with headache 
the ice took it away. Felt altogether better, and had a great 
deal better appetite ; felt so well, in fact, that she left off the ice 
the previous morning. Began to menstruate on the morning at 
the end of three weeks, instead of a month as usual. I directed 
that after menstruation had ceased, she should apply the Spinal 
Ice-bag once a day along the whole spine during forty-five 
minutes. 

May 21st.— The patient said she had applied the ice, as directed, 
for a short time after her last visit ; but that feeling quite well 
she soon discontinued its use. She had had no pain whatever, 
and described herself as " perfectly well." 

H 



90 NEURO-DYNAMIG MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SBKlES OF 

Case 35. — Intense Headache ; Acute Fain in the Four E9>- 
tremities ; General Swelling and Extreme Tenderness of 
the whole Body ; Ulceration of the Tongue ; Coiistipation 
of the Bowels. 

L, C, female, aged five, was brought to me at the Farriugdon 
Dispensary, April 15, 1868, in great suffering — in fact, her whole 
body seemed to be painful : she could not bear her mother or any 
one else to touch any part of it. The limbs were very perceptibly 
swollen, and her mother said the body generally was swollen. In 
the course of a few days she had seemed to become considerably 
stouter than before. Her skin was hot ; she was extremely thirsty ; 
she had a very troublesome, and almost incessant, dry cough ; 
there were several ulcers on her tongue, from two to three lines 
in diameter ; and her bowels were constipated. She could not 
bear pressure on any part of the spine. I regret very much 
that I did not record the state of her pulse. 

About a fortnight before I saw the child she began to complain 
of headache, which became increasingly severe. On April 9th 
she became decidedly ill, and could scarcely run about, and 
marked thirst and feverishness — the skin becoming^ hot — super- 
vened. On the 13th she began to complain of pain in all her 
limbs ; on the lith her shoes could not be got on ; and on the 
15th, when she was brought to me, she was so generally, and so 
painfully sensitive that she feared lest anyone should touch her. 
On the morning of that day her mother was particularly struck by 
the fact that the left side of her face, and of her neck down to 
the shoulder, was especially swollen. The swelling was most 
obvious in the feet and hands. During several nights her arms 
were violently jerked as she lay in bed. Her cough began about 
a fortnight before I saw her ; it steadily increased, and became 
so incessant as to prevent her mother from getting any rest at 
night. Puring the first ten days of her illness her bowels were 
relaxed j then they became constipated. I prescribed no medicine, 
but directed that ice should be applied along the whole spine 
during ninety minutes three times during the day. 

April 16th. — I saw the child at its home : she was lying quietly 
in bed, and told me that she had no headache, and no pain in her 
limbs. I could perceive no swelling in the hands, feet, or face, 
and could handle freely any part of the body, exerting pres- 
sure on the hands and feet, without causing pain. There was 
still considerable feverishness, and the ulcers on the tongue ap- 
peared much the same as on the previous day. The child had, 
however, slept a good deal in the early part of the morning. 
I now requested that she should be sponged all over with 



CASES ILLUSTRATINa IT^S PRINCIPLES AMD PRACTICE. 91 

warm water, and that the Use of the Spinal Ice-hag should be 
continued as before. 

April 18.— The little patient had borne the ice thoroughly well : 
both her father and mother stated that each time it was applied 
it soothed her in a remarkable manner ; and the mother added 
that only at the end of the hour when the Ice-bag had ceased to 
be cold did the child evince impatience. Headache, which I 
asked particularly about, was no longer complained of Her 
body exhibited no perceptible swelling anywhere, but there 
was tenderness of the arms and hands again to-day, causing her 
to cry when they were pressed upon. The arms were still hot, but 
the feet had become cool, and were no longer tender. I ordered 
the bowels to be kept open by means of castor oil, and the Spinal 
Ice-bag to be applied four times a day, great care being taken to 
remove it as soon as it should cease to be cold. 

April 25tli. — I found the child sitting up in bed eating a plum 
tart, and txnite free from pain, which was not produced even by 
pressure over any part of the limbs. I requested the ice to be 
aj)plied three times a day, and full doses of citrate of iron and 
quinine to be given also three times a day. 

May 2nd. — The patient walked across the room for the first 
time : she had no pain in the back. I requested the ice to be used 
now only twice a day. 

May 6th. — She walked to the Dispensary with her mother to- 
day, and continued free from pain. I ordered the discontinuance 
of the ice, and requested that as much nourishment as possible 
should be given, and that the tonic should be continued. 

May 9tli. — The child ran about, talked and sang. The appetite 
had much improved ; she could now take flesh meat. Her 
mother said "the child is wonderfully well now." I advised 
the continuance of the tonic medicine a little longer, and at this , 
date the patient ceased attendance at the Dispensary. 



Case 36. — Intense Headache ; Constant Aching, SuxUing, and 
Tenderness of the Limbs ; Tonic Contraction and. Hard- 
ness of the Muscles at the Bach of the Neckj and of those 
of the Fore-arm ; Excessive Constipation of the Boivels. 

April 16th, 1868. — When visiting on the first occasion the 
patient whose case is numbered 35, I found her sister, 0. C, aged 
fifteen, suffering in like manner. She complained of intense 
headache, which had lasted eleven days, and of constant aching of 
her four limbs. She seemed to be in a state of semi-stupor ; 
her limbs were swollen, but to a less e.ttent than her sister's were • 

H 2 



92 NEURO-DYNAMIC medicine exemplified : A 8ER1ES OF 

her right hand, however, particularly over the thenar eminence, 
was much swollen, and the fingers of the same hand were so 
spasmodically flexed that she could not extend them by any effort 
of her will. Owing to the powerful tonic contraction of the 
muscles at the back of the neck, her head was all but immovable. 
These muscles were remarkable hard, and pressure on them, as 
well as on those of the extremities, caused acute pain. The 
spine was decidedly tender, but less so than that of her sister. 
Her complexion was dusky, and her bowels were extremely con- 
stipated. I ordered the Spinal Ice-bag to be applied along the 
whole spine ninety minutes three times a day. No medicine. 

April 18th. — The headache had subsided, and the mental con- 
dition had greatly improved. The swelling was nowhere per- 
ceptible, but there was slight spasmodic contraction of the left 
hand this morning, The pain in the limbs was all but gone, and 
she could move her head freely. I now requested the Spinal Ice- 
bag to be applied only twice a da,y. 

April 20th. — The patient reported herself well, excepting that 
she felt some pain in the left epigastric region. Her complexion 
and expression had become remarkably clear. I advised the con- 
tinuance of the Spinal Ice-bag twice a day. 

April 25tli. — She continued to improve very satisfactorily, and 
the Spinal Ice-bag was ordered to be applied only once daily. 

May 6th. — The patient had become quite well, and the treat- 
ment was discontinued. 



Case 37. — Severe and Prolonged Headache ; Infra-iiw/ninw.ry 
Neuralgia ; Deficient and Unrefresliing Sleep ; Exces- 
sive Const i2Jatio7i of the Bowels ; Unduly frequent Micturi- 
tion ; Deficient and Retarded Menstruation ; Profuse 
Lcucorrlicea. 

0. S., aged twenty-two, came to me, May 16th, 1868, suftering 
from intensely oppressive headache, which had continued since 
the middle of the previous December, and had been increasing 
in intensity since that time ; but she said, " I seem to have been 
always affected in my head." She also complained of almost 
continuous pain beneath the left mamma. The whole spine, 
but especially the lumbar region, was very tender. The bowels had 
not been moved during the previous five days, and were often as 
long without action. Urinated about six times a day. She began 
to menstruate when between fourteen and fifteen years of age, 
but the menses had been always more or less irregular : ordinarily 
she went six, but had even gone ten weeks without menstruating ; 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 93 

she had had profuse leucorrhoea since the previous Christmas ; 
and her sleep was deficient and unrefreshing. I advised her 
to apply ice to the lumbar region during ninety minutes twice 
a day. 

May 20th. — Her headache and sideache were already much re- 
lieved, but her bowels were still constipated. I prescribed an 
aperient saline and the continuance of the ice as before. 

June 27th. — The patient had used the ice as ordered until 
2 1st June, and found its application very agreeable. The head- 
ache was " very much lessened ; " all the intense shooting pain 
had gone ; menstruation had been much more copious during the 
last period than formerly, and the pains she usually suffered were 
very much lessened. The leucorrhoea was nearly gone. Bowels 
"quite regular." She said — '' My sleep is much improved; in 
fact, I am nearlj' quite well." At this date the patient went into 
the country and the treatment was discontinued. 



Case 88. — Severe Neuralgia across the Sacrum, and in the Left 
Hip, Leg, and Foot ; Pain and occasional Sivelling of the 
Hands and of the Right Knee ; Glohcs Hystericus ; Ex~ 
cessively Frequent Micturition. 

F. E., aged sixty, one of Dr. Drysdale's patients treated by me 
at his request, complained. May 20th, 1868, of great and almost 
continuous pain across the sacrum, so extreme that it wore her 
out ; also of pain in the left hip, and down the outer side of the 
leg to the sole of the foot, and toes. Had pain in, and sometimes 
swelling of, the right knee also, which prevented her from walk- 
ing, and to which she sometimes applied a mustard poultice. The 
hands, too, were painful, witji pricking, shooting, and swelling of 
a gouty nature. She was also distressed by a burning lump in the 
throat, which especially troubled her when she swallowed. She 
urinated about every ten minutes, and could not hold her water 
more than fifteen minutes. She suffered but little from headache : 
her bowels were open daily ; and she had no leucorrhoea. Pulse 
84. I advised the application of the Lumbar Ice-bag to the lumbar 
and dorsal region during an hour twice a day. 

I did not see this patient again until January 23rd, 1869, when 
she informed me that the burning lump in the throat, the pain in 
the loins, and the pain and swelling in the hands, feet, and knees 
had all been remedied by the Spinal Ice-bag, and that the fre- 
quency of making water was much lessened. She had been un- 
able to use ice for many months past ; but the relief afforded by 
the application of it had been both great and speedy. 



94 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLiriED ; A SERIES OF 



Case 39. — Headache ; Severe Pain in the Chest-walls, espe- 
cially in Front of the Chest, Below the Left Mamma, and 
in the Shoulder-blades; Severe Cough; Shortness of 
Breath; Deficient and Painful Menstruation; Leucor- 
rhcea ; Constipation of the Bowels ; Coldness of the Feet. 



Mrs. P., aged thirty-three, consulted me June 23rd, 1868, when 
she complained of suffering severe pain in the front of the chest, 
below the left mamma, and in the shoulder-blades. She had " a 
dreadful cough," and experienced considerable difliculty of breath- 
ing, especially when going up stairs. Her ordinary medical at- 
tendant told her her lungs were affected, and advised her to give 
up work. She very often had headache, which was especially 
severe during her menstrual periods. She slept "very badly 
indeed," and had " a very bad appetite." Her bowels were ob- 
stinately costive, and she suffered greatly from dysmenorrhcea — 
the discharge being very scanty, and accompanied with intense 
pain. She was troubled " occasionally " with leucorrhoea ; her 
feet were habitually very cold, and she was extremely languid and 
incapable of work. I treated her solely by means of the Spinal 
Ice-bag, no medicine being prescribed. 

July 9th. — The pain in the chest and below the left mamma, 
as well as that in the shoulder-blades, had quite gone ; the head- 
ache and cough had ceased ; the breathing had become easier ; 
the bowels were less costive, being open every other day ; and 
her sense of fatigue was already very much lessened. 

July 21st. — There had been no return of the pain in any part 
of the thoracic region ; she began to menstruate July 3rd ; the 
ice was applied during the period as ordered ; her menstrual pains 
were lessened " a very great deal," and the flow was increased ; 
she had no headache whatever during her period ; she was sleep- 
ing every night " very well indeed ; " her bowels were open each 
day ; she was quite free from leucorrhoea ; and not only had all 
difficulty of breathing when walking vanished, but she assured 
me that she felt as fresh and vigorous as she had ever felt in her 
life. I did not see her again after this date. 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 



Case 40. — Neuralgia, of the Right Side of the Face, Neck, 
Shoulders, Breast, Axilla, and Might Upper Extremity, 
which was sometimes Partially Paralyzed; Troublesome 
Lachrymation ; Excessively Frequent Micturition-; Con- 
stipation of the Bowels ; Cramp ; Coldness of the Feet, 

S. G., female, aged forty-four, married, came to me June 24th, 
1868, suffering from neuralgia of the right side of the face, neck, 
shoulder, breast, axilla and right arm and hand. The latter became 
partially paralyzed at times. The pain, when least, was, she said, 
" a nasty smarting ; " when worst, fearfully shooting and stabbing, 
and was almost without intermission. Her eyes watered very 
much ; bowels constipated ; menstruation very free ; no leu- 
corrhcea ; made water two or three times an hour throughout the 
day ; had severe cramps in the legs ; feet habitually very cold. 
I treated her by means of the Spinal Ice-bag and small doses of 
chloride of ammonium. 

June 27th. — Felt somewhat better generally, and felt distinct 
relief while applying the ice, which she found very agreeable. 

July 3rd. — Had used ice regularly, except during her menstrual 
period. The bowels " were very comfortable." She said the 
cramps lessened while she continued to use the ice, and increased 
again when it was left off. The same remark applied to her 
urination. The neuralgic pain was less intense. 

July 22nd. — The patient said the pain was decidedly less fre- 
quent and intense, and the arm was stronger. The troublesome 
lachrymation had nearly ceased. Made water now only two or 
three times a day. 

August 26th. — Had remained free from neuralgia throughout 
her last menstrual period ; but she could not afford to supply 
herself with ice, and hence the treatment was discontinued, 



Case 41. — Headache; Uterine Neuralgia ; Insufficient Sleep ; 
Irripaired Appetite ; Deficient Menstruation ; Leucorrhcea. 

D. J., aged twenty-four, stated that about a year previously 
her menses became scanty and painful. When she consulted me 
they lasted only a day, were very slight, and were preluded by a 
day of great pain. Since the commencement of the dysmenorrhcea, 
she had been troubled with leucorrhcea. She had suffered during 
three years from headache, which had been increasing, and during 
the latter part of that period she had been "scarce a day" 



96 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 

without it ; it generally lasted all day, and sometimes almost 
deprived her of sight ; she was very restless at night ; appetite 
variable ; bowels regular. She was treated, in the first instance, 
exclusively by means of the Spinal Ice-bag. 

June 27th, 1868. — At this date the patient had been under 
treatment about six weeks ; she menstruated a fortnight ago, 
with very little pain indeed ; still had leucorrhoea. She said, 
" My head and eyes are much better," and she slept better. I 
requested the Spinal Ice-bag to be used as before, and prescribed 
Mistur^e gentianse, §j., ter die. 

July 25th. — Had used the ice during an hour twice a day ; was 
" unwell " two days a week previously ; the flow was more copious, 
and the patient suffered much less pain than she had been accus- 
tomed to do ; she had also less leucorrhoea. She stated that she 
had been free from headache for some time past, and repeated 
that she had better nights. Appetite much improved. I did not 
see this patient again. 



Case 42. — Headache ; Ovarian and Uterine Neuralgia ; 
, Backache ; Giddiness ; Deficient Menstruation ; Excessively 
Frequent Micturition ; Coldness of the Feet. 

August 22nd, 1868. — Ellen N., aged thirty-three, who had 
been married nine years, was troubled continually with the 
" whites," which had continued six years. She was " pretty 
regularly unwell, but there was scarcely anything at all, — scarcely 
a show, only a few spots." Her pain during her periods was so 
severe for twenty-four hours that she " could not sit or stand or do 
anything else." She had very severe headache, which continued 
all the day two or three times a week. She was very giddy, and 
had fallen " a time or two " in consequence ; suffered much pain 
in the hollow of the back. The pain was sometimes so severe 
that she said, "When I sit down 1 can hardly get up again." 
She complained also of pain in the region of the left ovarj^, which 
was brought on by walking ; bowels regular ; micturition fre- 
quent and abundant ; feet always very cold. She was treated 
solely by means of the Spinal Ice-bag and infusion of cinchona. 

August 29th. — The patient was already much better. The 
pain in the back and the giddiness were lessened ; the leucorrhoea 
too. 

September 12th. — The headache and giddiness were nearly 
gone. During the previous few days micturition had not been so 
frequent. "I feel better like in myself/' she said, "and more 
cheerful than I have done." 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 97 

October 3rd. — The leiicorrhcea had ahnost ceased ; the pain in 
the back quite so. She had felt headache but once during the 
previous fortnight, and then very slightly. There had been no 
recurrence of giddiness ; bowels regular ; pain in the region of 
the ovary quite gone. Treatment discontinued. 



Ca.se 43. — Painful Excitcibility of tlu Spinal Cord ; Head- 
ache ; Sickness ; Hcematemesis ; Pain in the Left Eye ; 
Unduly frequent Micturition; Coldness of the Lower 
Extremities. 

October 23, 186S. — I was consulted by a lady, aged about 
thirty-five, who was suffering in a preeminent degree from what I 
have called 'painful excitability of the spinal cord :' she complained 
of aching in the spine, most marked between the shoulders, and 
often ascending to the head, causing headache, face-ache, especiall}' 
in the nose, also pain in the e5^es ; when the pain was verj^ severe 
indeed it descended, affecting the waist and hips, and extended 
even to the knees ; this was followed by retching and sickness — 
often during an hour at a time, and after being sick a day she 
always vomited blood, not in large gushes, but in quantities suffi- 
cient to redden completely the whole of the ejected matter. The 
patient had these very severe attacks with sickness two or three 
times in the year, but suffered from back-ache, off and on, during 
all the cold months ; sometimes if she walked out on a cold day 
she was attacked with an extremely acute pain, like to that pro- 
duced by a hot iron, and with cramps, starting from between tlie 
scapukc atid extending to the head, which for a short time she could 
not move ; she was generally free from headache except during 
the attacks mentioned, but was peculiarly liable to great pain in 
the left eye. Chest always healthy ; tougue clean ; appetite 
small and rather feeble ; bowels prone to constipation — never 
opened above three or four times a week ; menstruation normal. 
The patient asserted that the smallest dose of calomel would in- 
duce it at any time : the Spinal Ice-bag did so when used, and I 
may add, used successfully, for stopping sea-sickness. Urination 
was very frequent during an attack — sometimes every quarter of an 
hour — at other times she was not troubled at all in this respect. 
Hands and feet always " stone cold " in winter ; she could scarcely 
make them warm at all. Pulse 80 — very feeble. Slept very 
badly ; was usually awake a dozen times during the night, and felt 
very weary in the morning. Long before she had pain in the 
back she used to suffer much from sickness and vomiting of blood, 
beginning nine years ago. Two or three grains of quinine in 
phosphoric acid generally benefited her temporarily. She had 



98 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 

taken bromide of potassium during a month, but she could not 
bear it ; she said it made her wretched : she could neither write, 
add u]D figures, nor remember peoples' names when under its 
influence, 

I treated this patient with ice only, and at the end of a week 
after prescribing for her I saw her again. She reported that the 
application of the Ice-bag speedily made her warm all over, but 
that it also caused a throbbing headache with flushed face. At 
first, fearing that the ice would make her cold, she sat near the 
fire whilst using it, but soon found it needless to do so, and having 
put on the bag when her feet were extremely cold, they became 
quite warm within half-an-hour. 

November 13th, 1868. — The patient generally continued wonder- 
fully warm, and became so, when walldng, much more readily than 
formerly. On the last occasion menstruation came on ten days 
before the regular time. Usually she had much pain during her 
periods, and the flow lasted four days ; on this occasion she was 
free from pain, and the flow lasted six days. 

Nov. 20tb. — On the loth she had no ice and suffered extremely 
from "neuralgic pain" shootiug up and down the spine, and 
from headache. On the 1 6th she applied ice and it caused a re- 
currence of the sanguineous discharge both in the morning and 
the afternoon. The patient was attacked with influenza, and 
being treated by the medical attendant of her family she ceased 
of course to follow my directions. 

December 2nd, she applied to me again (by letter). She wrote 
as follows : " I have now a great deal of spinal pain from 
between the shoulders into my head, and also neuralgia in my 
teeth, brow, and ears at times ; I have very sleepless nights, and 
sharp pains round my waist after eating ; I have, when that pain 
has become very intense, three or four times been sick, usually 
this is at night. . . . Dr. — — says I must have patience with 
the sickness, but I should like to try ice first, if you think I 
may, although I am afraid of trying it without your sanction," 
I prescribed the application of ice over flannel along the upper 
two-thirds of the spine, and simultaneously the application of an 
8-inch Water -bag, containing water at 115^ F. to the lower third 
of the spine during fifteen or twenty minutes twice a day ; also 
the application of ice in the same manner at any time whenever 
the patient became sick, and on those occasions, and those only, 
without using heat at the same time ; I also prescribed, beberiffi 
sulphatis, gr. iii, ter die. 

December 31st, 1868. — The patient reported as follows : On 
the 4th she began to take the pills as directed. On the 6th 
she had a violent spasm or cramp in the hypogastric region lasting 
from seven to nine p.m., when it became less severe but kept her 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 99 

awake all night ; she became sick with the pain, and was fre- 
quently so during the night. The next day she applied ice as I 
had directed, and continued to do so during a week using it only 
when she was especially sick. She began to menstruate three 
weeks and two days from the beginning of her preyious period 
which had come on before the end of three weeks from the begin- 
ning of the preceding one. The catamenia continued a week, 
whereas they formerly lasted but four days, and recurred only 
once a month, She said that the ice always seemed to do her 
good, that it was always pleasant, and that she both looked better 
and eat her food better after using it ; she was sure her spine had 
become less tender in consequence of the use of the ice, but she 
had ^' become dreadfully cold again after leaving it off." I ad- 
vised that the treatment last prescribed should, with some slight 
modification, be persisted in. 

January 16th, 1869. — She continued the use of the ice until 
this date, but left off the use of heat four or five days pre- 
viously. She had had two attacks of " spasms ;" had had more pain 
along the lower part of the back and down to the knees ; also 
more pain when '' poorly ; " and her appetite was feeble ; on the 
other hand she was assured that the ice stopped the sickness, made 
the upper part of the back less tender, and conduced to sleep. 
Moreover, the feeling which she used to have as of a red-hot iron 
up the spine which fixed the neck and left marked tenderness for 
two or three days after it came on, and the nervous headaches 
which also formerly troubled her had gone quite away since she 
had used the ice. 

Comment. — Unfortunately I never saw this patient again. Her 
favourable and unfavourable experiences of the effects of the treat- 
ment adopted testify with peculiar emphasis to the greatness of it§ 
power and to the truth of the general doctrine forming the basis, of 
Neuro-dynamic medicine. Within a week from the time the treat- 
ment began the patient who had habitually suffered from being cold 
had become warm all over. It is stated, Nov. 13, that whereas 
usually she had much pain during her catamenial periods, the 
first which occurred after she began to use the Spinal Ice-bag was 
without pain ; and the last time I saw her she reported that the 
ice stopped her sickness, lessened the tenderness of her spine, and 
abolished both her " nervous headaches," and the terrible feeling 
" as of a red-hot iron " up her spine. On the other hand, the ice 
as first applied caused " a throbbing headache with flushed face," 
a very unsatisfactory result it must be admitted, but one which 
ought to be impressively instructive to both the physiologist and 
physician. Claude Bernard's experiment on the cervical sympa- 
thetic was here virtually repeated, his conclusion concerning its 



100 JJEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 

function being decisively confirmed — but happily without recourse 
to vivisection. To the physician the result in question might 
suggest the idea that inasmuch as in this case the cerebral circu- 
lation was increased by applying ice to the spine, the large group 
of brain disorders the proximate cause of which is cerebral anaemia 
or insufficient nourishment of the brain-tissue may be most suc- 
cessfully treated by the Neuro-dynamic method. Again, though 
in this case it was difficult to obtain the advantages derivable 
from the use of the Spinal Ice-bag, because it induced the cata- 
menia with undue frequency and unduly long continuance the pro- 
duction of these remarkable effects ought surely to deepen the insight 
of the physiologist respecting the nature of the relation between the 
nervous system and the menstrual function, and to give the phy- 
sician an unspeakably important practical lesson in the treatment 
of uterine disorders, especially those forming the dysmenorrhceal 
group by the remedial method in question. I prescribed the sul- 
phate of beberia, and the application of heat along the lower 
third of the spine, in order to lessen the frequency and duration 
of the catamenia, and to check the action of the ice in increasing 
them : the patient reported, Dec. 31, that the catamenial interval 
had lengthened again. She also reported that having left off the 
ice during the previous ten days she had become dreadfully cold 
again ; and that subsequently having resumed its use together toith 
the ajpplication of heat along the loirer third of the spinal cord, she 
had more pain again when poorly, and more pain along the lower 
part of the hade and doivn to the hniees — results capable of being 
produced by heat thus applied and thoroughly accordant with 
the doctrine, forming the basis of the treatment which these 
cases exemplify. 

The patient was nominally under my care during only three 
months, and during portions of that time the treatment I pre- 
scribed was not practised ; in the course of those three months I 
saw her only six times. The gravity of her case and the remark- 
able susceptibility of her nervous system to the intluence of both 
heat and cold when applied to the spine made it almost indispen- 
sably necessary that she should be under my immediate care in 
London so that I could see her almost daily and could thus be 
enabled to modify the treatment adopted as I might have judged 
expedient according to the successive indications of the rapidly 
changing symptoms. In a case in which even the smallest dose 
of calomel induced the catamenia, and in which moderate doses of 
bromide of potassium disabled the patient from writing, adding up 
figures, and remembering peoples' names, the effects of the Neuro- 
dynamic treatment, which, precisely because it is pre-eminently 
powerful for good, can, if misused, easily do harm, needed constant 
and intelligent watching, so that the maximum of good with the 



CASES ItiLUSTRAflNG ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 10 1 

minimum of harm might be secured during its application. But 
the patient found it cost the least effort to submit herself to the 
ordinary treatment by means of drugs prescribed by the physician 
in her immediate neighbourhood, and I understood that her malady 
increased so seriously that at length she lapsed into unconscious- 
ness which continued a considerable time, and that she is still un- 
able to leave her couch. 



Case -44. — Prolonged Headache ; Suppression of the Menses. 

October 24:th, 1868. — Harriet W., aged seventeen, complained 
that she got wet three months previously about the time of her 
"period." She did not become " unwell," and had not menstruated 
since. She had suffered from headache during the previous four 
months. Her head was hot, and she slept very heavily ; her 
bowels were open daily; she did not suffer from cold feet. Pulse 
108. I prescribed the application of the Lumbar Ice-bag, until 
the ice should be melted, twice a day. No medicine. 

Oct. 31st. — She began to apply ice on the 25th, when she 
applied it once, and repeated the application once on the 27th 
and 29th. The patient worked until ten o'clock at night, and 
could not use the ice oftener than she had done : she said it made 
her back feel very cold, and also made her feel very heavy and 
sick. She applied the ice on the 29th at ten p.m., and began to 
menstruate at noon the next day, and was continuing to do so 
when she called upon me. I had previously given her aloes and 
arsenic in succession without effect. 

Nov. 14tli. — Had not been able to use ice at all since I last saw 
her, but had continued free from headache, and in other respects 
quite well. Menstruation continued until the end of November 
2nd. 



Case 45. — Habitual Headache ; Giddiness ; Backache; Uterine 
Neuralgia ; Pains, Weakness, and Coldness of the Feet ; 
Deficient Gatamenia. 

January 9th, 1869. — Harriet T., aged twenty-four, complained 
of pain between the shoulders, and in the lower part of the back. 
The whole spine was very tender on pressure, especially over the 
first and second and the eleventh and twelfth dorsal spines. She 
suffered from shortness of breath when going up-hill or up-stairs ; 
she felt giddy two or three times a week, and had headache con- 
stantly ; menstruation only lasted two days ; she suffered a gTeat 
deal of pain all the time, as well as a day before menstruation 



102 NEtJRO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 

began. During her " period," the pains in the head and lumbar 
region were much increased ; she suffered from weakness and pain 
over the tops of the inste^js ; had no cough ; tongue clean ; ap- 
petite rather feeble ; feet cold, I ordered ice to be applied along 
the lower third of the spine, sixty minutes, twice a day. 

Jan. 16 th. — The pain in the back was much lessened. The 
patient felt much stronger, and said, — " My breath is not so short 
as it was." "I have only had one of those giddy sensations in 
the head, and this week have had no headache." Pain in the 
insteps lessened, and feet much warmer. Requested to increase 
the application of ice to ninety minutes, twice a day. 

Jan. 23rd. — The patient began to menstruate on the morning 
of the 20th inst., and felt no pain. The weakness and pain in 
the insteps were quite gone ; the feet were very warm ; she con- 
sidered herself quite cured. However, I advised her to continue 
the treatment a week or two longer ; but I did not see her 
again. 

Case 46. — Pains and SioeUiny of the Fed ; Great Difficulty 
in Walking. 

Jan. 14th, 1869. — Wm. B., aged twenty-five, complained of 
pain in both feet, "just as if blood was rushing into them." The 
right ankle was swollen on the inner side, and the joint felt loose, 
he said. He walked with great difhculty, and when walking he 
had pain along the soles of both feet, as if they were affected with 
rheumatic or gouty inflammation ; also when walking he oscillated 
laterally, as if balancing himself. These symptoms made their 
appearance for the first time about eight months previously. 
When he stood he had a feeling of tightness, ''as if something- 
was drawing the soles of the feet together, and wanted to be ex- 
panded." Walking to his business, a distance of one mile, look 
him from forty-five to sixty minutes. 

When the patient was ten years old he received a blow be- 
hind his ear, which was followed by partial (nearly complete) 
blindness of both eyes, " caused by a film over his eyes," as he 
said. The sight of the right eye was still defective. The bowels 
were regular, and the feet were generally warm ; no spinal tender- 
ness. I ordered ice to be applied to the dorso -lumbar region for 
two hours twice a day. 

Jan. 20th. — The patient walked much better ; he could stand 
longer without feeling pain, and could use his feet more quickly. 
He had not had the feeling as if the blood were rushing into 
them. The swelling in the right ankle was much lessened. The 
treatment previously ordered was continued. 

Jan. 27tli.— His power of walking had greatly increased. His 



OASES ILLUST^fiATlNG ITS PEINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 103 

right foot was very much more flexible, aud he felt himself, on the 
whole, very much better. He was requested to continue the treat- 
ment as before. 

Feb. 10th. — The patient walked into my consulting-room with- 
out any lameness. He was then able to go to his business in 
twenty- j&ve minutes. I advised him still to continue the ice as 
before, to have the right foot vigorously rubbed, and to take 
Potassii bromidii, gr. vij. ; Infusi. calumbse, §ss., bis die. 

Feb. 24th. — The swelling of the right foot was quite gone ; he 
could walk to business in twenty-two minutes ; he was able to lift 
and carry things, which he was not able to do before. The patient 
reported himself "'another man," in every respect. However, I 
advised him to continue the use of ice some time longer ; but 1 
did not see him again. 

Oase 47. — Headache; Fain hetweeii the Shaioldef's and in the 
Chest; Cough and Copious Expectoration; Shortness of 
Breath ; Suppression of the Catamenia ; Coldness of the, 
Feet. 

February 2nd, 1869. — Ann S., aged twenty-eight, complained 
of "pain in the chest," and in her back between the shoulders : 
she had suffered thus for about three months ; she coughed very 
much, and expectorated copiously ; she generally had headache, 
especially during the last few weeks before I first saw her ; she had 
not menstruated for four months. A remarkable feature in this 
case was that she had no leucorrhoea. Her bowels were open 
daily ; she suffered much from coldness of the feet, especially 
during the previous two months ; going up-stairs tired her very 
much. I ordered ice to be applied to the lumbar region in the 
upper cell only of the Lumbar Ice-bag, sixty minutes, three times 
a day. 

Feb. 7th. — The patient 'began to menstruate on the 6th of 
February ; she had no headache, and said, " I feel much stronger ; 
my breath is much easier." The feet had been much warmer 
during the previous three or four days. She was requested to 
continue the use of the Spinal Ice-bag during the catamenial 
period. 

Feb. 10th. — The ice had caused her no inconvenience whatever, 
but the flow ceased on Sunday. The patient said, " I feel almost 
as if I were quite well." I advised her to continue the ice as 
before, and to take ferri et quinee citratis, gr. v., and Olei 
morrhuse, 5ij-; bis die. 

April 24th. — The patient began to menstruate on the 20th, and 
continued to do so four days without pain of any kind. She was 
well in all respects, and the treatment was discontinued. 



104 NEmiO-DYNAMlC MEDICINE EXEMPLiriED : A SERIES Of 



Case 48. — Thoracic Neuralgia. 

April lOtli, 1869. — Catharine W., aged forty-five, married, 
suffered from thoracic neuralgia, which had continued uninter- 
ruptedly for three weeks. Even during each night the pain was 
always present, so that, except when, overpowered with exhaustion, 
she had dozed a little, the pain, she declared, had never left her. 
It was chiefly on the left side, below the left mamma, and 
extending backward to the spine ; but it also shifted to the 
right side, extending upwards under the blade-bone. She said 
the pain was just as if she " was taking a penknife and jobbing 
it in the bone." On each side the character of the pain was 
the same. About seven years previously she was in Bartholo- 
mew's Hospital fifteen weeks with similar symptoms. She 
was told at the hospital she was suffering from pleurisy, and 
was cupped, leeched, and blistered. She was five weeks before 
she got any relief at all, and having got gradually better she left 
the hospital. The leeching, blistering, and cupping was all within 
the first week. I ordered ice to be applied forty-five minutes 
along the whole spine three times a day. During the first appli- 
cation the pain subsided entirely, but recurred about thirty 
minutes after the bag was removed. The pain recurred very 
slightly after the second application, and scarcely at all after the 
third. 

April 14th. — I ordered the bag to be used ninety minutes. 
This was done daily four times, and no pain whatever was felt 
after the first of these applications. 

April 17th. — The woman brought back the bag with over- 
whelming expressions of thankfulness for the cure of her malady. 

Case 49. —Headache ; Fain in the Chest and Side ; Retching 
and Vomiting ; Constijjation of the Bowels. 

April 17th, 1869. — Annie H., aged twenty-four, complained 
of pain in the head, chest, and side ; of retching and vouiiting — 
everything she ate causing her to be sick ; and of couotipated 
bowels. Her menses during the last five months had been ex- 
tremely scanty, " a mere show." I treated her exclusively by 
means of ice. , 

June 12tli. — She had used the ice, as ordered, regularly. The 
pains and sickness were quite gone ; the patient said she had 
not been sick at all during the last month, and that her bowels 
had become regular ; she had menstruated twice freely, " the 
second time abundantly." She reported herself quite well, and 
therefore ceased to attend at the Dispensary, 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. l05 



Case 50. — Prolonged Headache ; Infra-mammary Neuralgia, ; 
Heavy and Unrefreshing Sleep ; Cough ; Deficient Oaia- 
menia ; Coldness of the Feet. 

June 12tli, 1869. — Elisabeth H., aged twenty, consulted me, 
when she complained of almost continuous headache, of pain 
beneath her left breast, and of a dry cough. Her menses were 
very deficient, and had always been so ; but they recurred 
regularly. During their recurrence lier headache was much in- 
creased : it was most severe during the early part of the day. 
She slept very heavily, and felt as sleepy in the mornings as if 
she had not been to bed. I prescribed the application of the 
Lumbar Ice-bag in the lumbar region, twice a day, until the ice 
should be melted, and infusi calumbte, §j., twice a day. 

I did not seethe patient again until May 11th, 1872, when she 
informed me, that by acting on my advice in 1869, she was 
completely freed from all pain, and had become thoroughly Avell. 



Case 51. — Intense Pain of Several Years' Duration in the 
Lumbar Region. 

June 16th, 1869. — Mrs. W., aged twenty-seven, complained of 
intense pain across the hollow of her back. It had troubled her 
during several years, and had increased in severity, especially 
during the preceding four months. There was very great tender- 
ness of the lower dorsal and of the lumbar spine. 

She was treated exclusively by means of the Lumbar Ice-bag, 
and on June the 30th — after the lapse of only fourteen days — 
she assured me that the pain was completely annulled, and that . 
her back was wonderfully strengthened. 



Case 52,- — Headache ; Ocular and Intercostcd Nem'algia ; 
Bachachc ; Incontinence of Urine. 

July 11th, 1869. — Mary M'C, aged twenty-nine, came to me 
a few months previously complaining of pain in the head and 
across the eyes, also of extreme pain in different parts of the walls 
of the chest — especially below the left mamma — and in the lum- 
bar region. Suffered much from incontinence of urine. She was 
treated solely by means of the Spinal Ice-bag. 

The patient said that she found herself generally improved 
under the ice treatment adopted according to my directions, espe- 

I 



106 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES Of 

cially in respect to increase of circulation, denoted by increased 
warmth. She said, " I am natural now ; I was not natural before, 
I was so cold : the least thing makes me warm now." 

July 2nd, 1870. — The patient stated that she continued the 
treatment advised for several months after I last saw her — in fact, 
until she felt she needed it no more. The incontinence of urine 
had quite ceased in about four months. The eyes were much 
better ; and she experienced no pain in the chest, mamma, or 
lumbar region. 

Case 63. — Headaclu ; Griddiness ; Severe Pain in the Hollovj 
of the Back ; Great Tenderness along the Spine ; Violent 
Cough ; Constipation of the Bowels ; Leucorrhcea ; A hnor- 
mally Frequent Micturition. 

July 18th, 1869. — Jane J., aged twenty, married four months 
previously, complained of extreme pain in the hollow of the back. 
It was felt daily, but much worse during menstruation, when she 
had horrible pain in the back generally, increasing sometimes to 
an intense paroxysm, which lasted about five hours. There was 
great tenderness along the dorsal and lumbar spines. Pressure on 
the dorsal spine caused a peculiar and most distressing pain at 
the middle of the sternum, and affected her breathing. She 
complained also of giddiness and pain in the head, which had 
frequently caused her to reel. After sleeping, " I wake up," she 
said, " so dreadfully giddy ; " she slept soundly, except that fre- 
quently, though not every night, she was seized with a violent 
cough, which lasted from a few minutes to two hours, and caused 
her a distressing '' dragging " at the base of the chest : she ex- 
pectorated freely afterwards. Pulse, 100 ; bowels " very con- 
fined." Urinated very often at times, and " sometimes Pm quite 
different," she said. Suffered from leucorrhcea " of a bad kind," 
which had troubled her for years, but which increased appreciably 
before menstruation ; indeed, the menstrual discharge seemed to 
consist in great part of leucorrhcea. She was very weak, and 
could scarcely stand. 

I advised her to apply ice along the lower two-thirds of the 
spine during an hour three times a day, and to take aperient pills 
occasionally. 

September 14th. — The patient continued the use of the ice twice 
a day during a month, and afterwards about once a day during 
a fortnight. The pain in the back gradually lessened : "I felt," 
she said, " different in a week, but very different in a fortnight," 
and at the end of " about a month I had lost the pain alto- 
gether," except during menstruation. She had then a little pain, 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 107 

" very little — it only just came on now and then." The giddiness 
had quite ceased, and the headache had lessened " very miich." 
The violent cough, dragging, &c., at the bottom of the chest were 
''entirely gone." No expectoration. The spine could be forcibly 
percussed without causing pain, and the peculiar sensation at the 
]3ottom of the sternum could not be reproduced. Her bowels had 
become " nicely regular," and she made water with normal fre- 
quency — not more than once or twice a day. The leucorrhoea 
was much lessened, and much less offensive than it was before 
treatment. The patient felt altogether "much better — much 
stronger." She was about leaving London for Hertfordshire, and 
the treatment was discontinued. 



Case 54. — Headache Contimied from Ghildhood ; Infra- 
mammary and Uterine Neuralgia ; Bachaclie ; Deficient 
Menstruation; Prolonged Leucorrhoea ; Slight Cough arid 
Hcemoptysis ; Constipation of the Boivels, 

July 21st, 1869. — Susan P., aged twenty, complained of head- 
ache, to which she had been always subject as long as she could 
remember. It occurred generally every day, and was worst in 
the afternoon. Suffered pain below the mammae, which had 
troubled her at frequent intervals during the previous two months ; 
had also very much pain in the hollow of the back, which was re- 
lieved by pressure on it ; had a slight cough, and spat blood twice 
the previous week ; had always — since she was thirteen years of 
age — suffered from dysmenorrhoea with great pain ; the flow lasted 
about two days, but was very scanty ; had suffered from leucor- 
rhoea for a long period constantly ; bowels constipated, I pre- 
scribed the use of the Lumbar Ice-bag, and Ammonii chloridi, 
gr, vij, ; inf, calumb., § ss., ter die, 

August 11th. — The patient said she had used ice regularly aa 
directed ; her headache was much lessened ; she had passed 
several days without it ; the infra-mammary pain and cough had 
quite gone, and she had had no haemoptysis since she commenced 
appljdng ice ; the pain in the hollow of the back was scarcely 
felt ; the bowels were still constipated, but less so than before I 
saw her. After using the ice a few days she became unwell ; the 
pain was very much lessened, and the flow was increased, and 
lasted four days ; she wore the ice during the whole period ; the 
leucorrhoea was also much lessened, 

September 22nd. — The patient found the application of the ice 
rather pleasant than otherwise. She said, " The headache is a 
great deal better ; I scarcely have it at all now. I've been three or 
four days at a time quite clear of it." The pain in the hollow of her 

I 2 



108 NBURO-DYKAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIllED : A SERIES OF 

back was " quite gone." The bowels had become open daily. The 
menses, which had recurred the previous week, continued 
three days, and were considerably more copious than formerly. 
During the previous fortnight she had had no leucorrhoea at all. 

October 26th. — There was again a marked improvement : she 
was better in all respects. At this date I advised her to use the 
ice once daily, and to take 01. morrhuse, 3iJ-> bis die ; also Ferri 
et quinre citratis, gr. v., bis die. 

February 15th, 1870. — The patient reported herself well in all 
respects : she looked so, and had become thoroughly rosy. Treat- 
ment was therefore discontinued. 



Case 55. — Neuralgia of the, Head, Face, and ShouMers ; Ex- 
eessive Gonstiixdion of the Bowels. 

October 2nd, 1869. — Mrs. S. suffered from neuralgia, which 
was chiefly in the left side of the head and face, and which con- 
tinued for about the half of each day. It generally came on in 
the morning. She said, " At the corner of my left eye there 
seems something drawing ; then it goes into my right eye, and 
down to my shoulders." During the attacks the left eye shed 
tears freely. Her mother said, "sometimes she had seen her turn 
very white." The least excitement, or a very warm place, brought 
on an attack. She did not suffer from headache. Bowels very 
much constipated ; menses regular ; feet warm ; pulse 100 ; 
tongue clean. She was treated solely by means of the Spinal 
Ice-bag. 

October 13th. — 'We attacks were much slighter ; the pain 
did not extend to the shoulder ; and there was no lachrymation. 
All her symptoms were strikingly lessened. 

October 20th. — The pain came on only for two or three 
minutes daily, and was much lessened in intensity. Bowels less 
constipated, but still rather confined. 

November 20th. — The patient had been quite free from pain 
during the previous ten days, and, November 13th, the treatment 
was discontinued. 

Case 56. — Severe Facial Neitralgia ; Headache ; Ahnormally 
Frequent Micturition; Excessive Coldness of the Feet; 
Great Tenderness of the Spine. 

H. B., aged thirty-two, bookbinder, suffering from severe facial 
neuralgia, consulted me October 19th, 1869. The pain was 
chiefly felt in the lower jaw and region of the ear, sometimes on 
one side, sometimes on the other, and recurred daily. The patient 



CASES ILLUSTEATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 109 

never passed twenty-four hours without an attack, and each attack 
lasted about five hours. His fellow workmen observed that during 
his attacks his face had a pasty aspect, and that afterwards it was 
sometimes swollen. He found that exposure of the painful side 
of the face to external cold gave relief When the attacks awoke 
him up in the night he wholly lost his night's rest. The disease 
began about ten months previously. During the first three 
months it came on with notable regularity each evening when 
the gas was lighted in the work-room, which became much hotter 
in consequence. The pain usually continued till about 12 p.m. ; 
subsequently, it ceased to have a distinctly periodic character, 
but the attacks became increasingly severe. He also often suf- 
fered from headache. Pressure on the spine of the atlas produced 
sharp pain. Marked tenderness was also evinced when pressure 
was made along the lower half of the spine : pressure on the 
seventh dorsal spine caused the patient to feel as if his breath 
were stopped ; pressure on the upper lumbar was especially pain- 
ful, on the intervening spines less so. 

The patient rose four or five times each night to pass water ; 
and ever since he could remember he had suffered from great 
coldness of the feet. The tongue was fairly clean ; bowels regu- 
lar ; pulse 64, rather feeble, but steady. His urine deposited a 
sediment, which, he said, " furs the chamber pot." He had been 
treated at King's College Hospital, chiefly, he believed, by means 
of quinine and iron internally, and belladonna to the face, but 
without benefit. He afterwards obtained some slight but only 
temporary relief by taking chloride of ammonium, prescribed for 
him at the Farringdon Dispensary. He had had two teeth drawn 
in the hope of being relieved from his misery, but without avail. 

I advised the application of the upper cell of a 22-inch Spinal 
Ice-bag along the lower third of the spine during an hour and a 
quarter twice a day. 

October 22nd. — The patient reported himself better : the at- 
tacks had become less violent, and he had not risen at all during 
the night to make water since he had used the Spinal Ice-bag. I 
then prescribed the application of the upper two cells of it along 
the lower two-thirds of the spine, till the ice should be melted, 
twice a day. 

October 29th. — The patient said, " I'm a great deal better : 
there seems a subdued pain, but as if something was struggling 
with it to keep it down. The pain is there, but it feels as if it 
were dying away, — ^like the fag end of a pain. It comes on just 
about the same time now as it did at first ; but it's really so slight 
now, that I scarcely take any note of it. Last Saturday [six days 
previously] it was very bad from two in the morning till nine at 
night ; since then, I've scarcely been troubled at all." On that 



no NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 

day no ice was applied till night. I again advised the application 
of the Spinal Ice-bag as before, till the ice should be melted, 
twice a day. 

November 5th. — Had had scarcely any pain at all ; had only felt, 
in the front of the ear, slight jumping pains, lasting a few seconds, 
and recurring at twilight ; had lost his headaches entirely ; his 
urine had deposited no sediment since the third day of using the 
Spinal Ice-bag ; made water only two or three times a day, and 
not at all at night ; said that, so far as his general health was 
concerned, he never was better in his life. I advised him to per- 
sist ia the treatment last prescribed. 

November 19th. — Had had only one attack of pain since last 
visit, and then, by appl)ang the Spinal Ice-bag, he caused it to 
vanish within ten minutes. The tenderness of the spine, especially 
over the first cervical vertebra, was wonderfully lessened ; the 
feet were " immensely warmer." He now began to apply the 
Spinal Ice-bag at night only. I advised him to continue it to the 
lower two-thirds of the spine as before, but only during an hour ; 
and then to apply it across the first cervical spine till the ice 
should be melted. 

December 3rd. — He continued free from his malady " except," 
he said, " about twice a day I may feel two little ticks, lasting 
about a second each, not more — quiet beats, not painful," at the 
original seat of pain. The application of ice twice across the 
occiput made him feel sick. He was again requested to restrict 
the Spinal Ice-bag to the lower two-thirds of the spine, continuing 
its use each night till the ice should be melted. 

January 18th, 1870. — Had continued free from pain while 
continuing to use the Spinal Ice-bag ; but he said, "' I find that 
if I don't use it the pain comes back. During three days at 
Christmas I went without ice altogether, and the pain became 
dreadful. I find that I can go over one day without using the 
bag, or two at a push, but I can't extend it to three." He was 
requested to continue the treatment as before. 

May 3rd, 1870. — Had been free from pain during three months, 
and enabled to dispense with the Spinal Ice-bag during about ten 
weeks ; but at length the pain returned on the left side of 
the face. He therefore resumed the use of the Spinal Ice-bag 
April 28th, and had had no pain until the morning, when he called 
upon me. He liad had no ice the previous night. I requested 
him to apply the upper two cells of the Spinal Ice-bag to the 
lower two -thirds of the spine each night till the ice should be 
melted, and prescribed the following : — Ammonii chloridi, 3iij. ; 
aquce camphorse, §xij. ; capiat., §ss., ter die. 

May 24th, 1871. — He reported that he applied the ice as 
ordered during seven days, that after the third day the neuralgia 
ceased, and that it had never returned. 



CAfeBS ILLUSTEATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE!. Ill 

Case 57. — Temporary hut Freqitently Recurring Blindness 
follovjecl ly Intense Headache, and. associated vnth Hy- 
pcrc&mia of the Betina. 

One of the most instructive and decisive proofs of the possi- 
bility of increasing or decreasing the peripheral circulation by 
modifying the temperature of the spinal region consists in the 
effects which may be thus produced on the circulation within the 
eye. I have obtained this proof and have been able, in several 
instances to improve vision by acting on the spine ; and Mr. 
Ernest Hart, whose especial devotion to diseases of the eye 
renders his observations of the effects in question the more 
valuable, has experienced the truth of my assertion. He treated 
the case I am now about to describe, but as he did not publish it, 
it seems desirable that I should do so. The patient is the cousin 
and was under the care of a medical man by whom he was taken 
to Mr. Hart, and who both gave me an outline of the case and 
sent the patient himself to me. The following account I wrote 
down, Oct. 30th, 1869, from the patient's own lips : — 

J. S., aged fifty, was attacked quite five years previously with 
a peculiar kind of temporary blindness, which continued until he 
was treated as hereafter described. A sort of mist came over his 
eyes in such a way that he could see only parts of objects — the 
parts seen became gradually less, until at length he could see "a 
mere nothing of them." Then the sight began to be gradually 
recovered ; the parts of objects seen became gradually larger until 
he could see the whole — a perfectly dense mist however being left 
during from thirty to sixty minutes on the right side. The 
attacks occupied about thirty minutes coming on, and about the 
same time going off ; both eyes were affected in the same way. 
The attacks were not preceded but were always followed by an 
extreme headache, almost incapacitating the patient from doing 
anything, and generally lasting from ten to twelve hours. The 
blindness recurred two or three times a week at least, but some- 
times two or three times a day ; in the latter case several da5^s 
might elapse before another attack occurred ; the patient suffered 
to this degree of severity during about two years. From child- 
hood he had been especially liable to headache and rarely passed 
a week without it ; his father suffered in this respect in the same 
way. 

He had had much advice and had taken a great deal of medi- 
cine without benefit ; he was at length taken to Mr. Ernest Haii;, 
who treated him during several months by means of drugs, and 
also requested him to take freely of cream-cheese and clotted 
pfeam, but without any avail I understood that Mr. Hart, ag 



112 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OP 

well as other oculists who had seen the patient, stated that there 
was congestion of the retinal blood-vessels ; at all events, after he 
had found that the treatment just mentioned did no good, he 
ordered the application to the cilio-spinal region of a 10-inch 
Spinal Water-bag containing warm water twice a day, each appli- 
cation being continued during half-an-hour. In the course of the 
first week during which heat was thus applied, the attacks were 
wonderfully subdued in respect both to frequency and severity, 
and at the end of about a month they had almost wholly ceased. 
The bag was applied a few weeks longer and then was left off 
altogether, and the patient continued free of attacks during nearly 
six months, and then only one was experienced. In about six 
months afterwards two more followed, and since then until the 
time when the patient called upon me — a period of twelve months 
— he had had no attack whatever. His headaches since the use of 
the Spinal Water-bag had been, he said, " comparatively nothing 
to what they used to be." His general health at the date of the 
report was very good indeed. 

Case 58. — Fits of Agonizing Pai7i in the Chest and Abdomen ; 
Neuralgia in the Right Shoulder and in various other 
'^arts of the Body ; Extreme General Weakness, Emacia- 
tion, and Coldness ; Excruciating Tenderness of the Spine ; 
Arrested Growth. 

November 29th, 1869, 1 was consulted concerning M. C, a girl, 
aged twelve, who was afflicted with fits of intensely agonizing 
pains, chiefly in the chest, and sometimes in the abdomen, 
causing her to bend herself double, and to utter piercing screams 
which were often heard across the street. It was not clear from 
the description of the attacks whether the body was bent forwards 
voluntarily or involuntarily ; her mother thought it was to ease 
the pain, but sometimes the patient was bent forcibly backwards. 
She never lost consciousness. Each attack lasted from twenty 
minutes to two or every three hours. The attacks recurred with 
terrible frequency. Latterly she had also complained of pain in 
the right shoulder, and of flying pains attacking in succession 
almost every part of the body. The child was extremely weak, 
pallid and emaciated, and was so exhausted as to be unable to 
walk more than a few steps. Though twelve years old, she did 
not look more than about six in respect to stature, but her mental 
expression denoted the experience of an adult. She did not 
suffer from headache, was intelligent, and able to read. When 
free from pain she slept fairly well. The lower extremities, from 
the knees downward, were habitually very cold. Pressure on the 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 113 

second cervical and on the fifth him bar spme caused immediate 
and excruciating pain. The chiki had been an out-patient at 
the Royal Free Hospital, and an in-patient both at University- 
College Hospital and at the Children's Hospital in Great Ormond 
Street. 

I requested the patient's mother to clothe her down to the 
wrists and ankles in thick flannel ; to apply a 16-inch Spinal 
Ice-bag along the whole spine, during twenty minutes three times 
daily, and to give Olei morrhuse, 5j-j ^erri et quinee citratis., 
gr. iij, bis die. 

December 18. — The child had had only two attacks since the 
treatment began, and both were much slighter than usual. Her 
appetite was wonderfully improved, and her mother thought that 
the second attack had been brought on by eating salt beef. She 
was warmer, heavier, and altogether better and more cheerful, 
and she was able to walk and play about every day. The treat- 
ment already prescribed was continued. 

January 8th, 1870. — She had had no further attack ; her legs 
and arms had become very warm. Her mother volunteered the 
remark that she needed less clothing at night ; she ran about in 
the street, and this morning had walked nearly a mile. Sleep 
very good ; tongue clean ; appetite very satisfactory ; bowels 
regular. I now requested the Spinal Ice-bag to be applied along 
the whole spine forty-five minutes twice a day. Medicines as 
before. 

April 2nd. — The Spinal Ice-bag had been left off during a week, 
owing to a misunderstanding of my instructions, and during that 
week the patient had had three attacks ; but since the use of the 
bag had been resumed, she had had none, and this morning she 
walked into my room, seemingly quite well. She looked plump 
and fresh, her cheeks having a clear rosy hue. I requested her 
mother to continue the ice as before but to stop the use of 
medicines. 

June 11th. — The patient had had no attack. Her mother said 
" she has had no pain or ache whatever, in any shape or form." 
She had become wonderfully strong and walked about with per- 
fect ease ; she had a capital appetite ; she slept well, and her 
bowels were open each morning. However, I advised the mother 
to continue the ice once daily if possible, and to give the child 
change of air. 

In June, 1872, the patient was brought to me by her mother, 
who informed me that the child had had no relapse, and had 
continued strong and well. She looked thoroughly well, but con- 
tinued of remarkably diminutive stature. The progress of this 
remarkable case was witnessed by Miss Firth, who is well known 
as a practitioner of midwifery, and who sent the patient to me in 
the first instance. 



114 NEUEO -DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED: A SERIES OF 



Case 59. — Headache ; Pain in the Instep ; Extremely Severe 
Uterine Neuralgia ; ■ Irregular and. very Deficient Cata- 
menia ; FeeUe Api^etite ; Luligestion ; Flatnlence ; 
Vomiting ; General Feebleness, Emaciation^ and Coldness. 

Miss W. S., aged seventeen, who was first seen by me Nov. 21, 
1869, began to menstruate two years and a half previously. The 
function had continued to recur, but at periods both irregular and 
abnormally far apart ; six weeks often intervened, not unfre- 
quently a longer time, and on one occasion the catamenial in- 
terval extended to four months. During her periods she suffered 
fearfully : throughout the first day she was in one continuous 
agony, which kept her, to use her mothers' expressive phrase, 
" rolled up in a ball ; " the second and third days she suffered 
less and could move about. Her mother said, " the pain is so 
severe that though she is not given to crying she is constrained 
to cry." During the first day she also suffered from " spasms " 
and sickness. She had continuous nausea, and if she ate any- 
thing it was vomited immediately. She was liable to headache, 
chiefly in the mornings ; she was much troubled with indigestion, 
feeble appetite, flatulence, and excessive constipation. Her con- 
stitution was remarkably feeble, and she spoke habitually in a 
low voice as if she had not sufiicient expiratory force to sustain a 
conversation at the ordinary pitch ; she was very thin, and her 
extremities were remarkably cold ; "in fact," her mother said, ^' I 
might say they are never warm ; " she sufi^ered from childhood in 
both hands and feet from chilblains. About eight years previously 
she strained her instep, and it seemingly got quite well ; "for years," 
her mother said, " I never heard of it ; " but during the two years 
immediately before I saw her she had complained of the recur- 
rence of the pain whenever her indigestion was worse than usual. 
The pain sometimes lasted for several days during which she was 
unable to walk at all. The lungs were healthy, except that at 
the base of the left lung the respiration was wavy and defective. 
There was no tenderness but marked curvature of the spine in 
the dorso-lumbar region, the convexity of the largest curve being 
leftwards. Pulse 90 — very feeble. 

The treatment of this case, which was chiefly by means of ice, 
and which was continued during several months under my per- 
sonal superintendence needed, owing to the extreme delicacy of 
the patient, great and constant care. Along with the use of ice 
I prescribed iron, cod-liver oil, a course of gentle gymnastics 
under a skilled master, and regular systematic singing. The re- 
sult proved thoroughly satisfactory. Already at the end of e^ 



CASKS ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTIOB. 115 

fortnight from the time when the treatment began, she was gene- 
rally stronger and better, and remarked as a proof of her im- 
provement, " I feel as if I could sit up straight." Her indigestion 
and flatulence were lessened ; her bowels had become open daily ; 
she reported herself warmer, though still disposed to be cold ; the 
chilblains which had troubled her in November had disappeared ; 
so also had the pain in the instep ; and the breathing had become 
as clear and equable at the base of the left lung as it was in that 
of the right, indeed in both it had become clearer and more dis- 
tinct. Graduall)^ all her troubles subsided ; her digestive power 
became normal ; she ceased to be sick or to feel nausea at her 
" periods ; " her bowels acted daily ; she lost her headaches ; the 
catamenia recurred monthly, copiously, and without any pain at 
all ; she became generally warmer and stronger ; and, in fact, at 
the end of four months, when my treatment of her ceased, her 
constitution had become wonderfully renovated. 



Case 60. — Pain in the Right Temple, at the Bach and Base of 
the Head, between the Shoulders, and across the Loins; 
Uterine Neuralgia, accompanied luith Retching and Diar- 
rhoea, ; Retarded, Intermittent, and very Deficient Cata- 
menia ; Profuse Lcucorrhcea ; Coldness of the Feet. 

January 13th, 1870. — Mrs. R., aged twenty-nine, complained of 
severe pains right across her loins, and between her shoulders. The 
former scarcely ever ceased, and were much the most intense at 
night. She suffered also from excessive pain at the back and base 
of the brain. This pain was induced by any ordinary noise, as well 
as by her own laughing or singing. She had often pain, too, in 
the right temple. Each menstrual period was preluded during 
about a week by a great increase of the lumbar pain, and by pain 
in the womb. " About the day before " the flow began diarrhoea 
set in, accompanied with pains, which, she said, almost drew her 
double ; and sometimes during her periods she suffered from pro- 
longed retching. 

Appetite " very bad indeed ; " bowels "pretty regular," but more 
confined than formerly ; was troubled with profuse leucorrhoea, 
which had lasted several years ; the menses recurred about every 
fifth week, and lasted, " on and off," less than two days ; the flow 
was intermittent : she said, — " Sometimes I rise out of bed in the 
morning and see something, and then see no more all day." The 
discharge was so slight that she needed only one napkin during her 
period. She suffered " very much" from coldness of the feet : her 
husband couldn't bear to feel her feet at night. Prior to her 



116 :NEUR0-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 

marriage, ten years previously, she menstruated copiously, and 
enjoyed thoroughly good health. Had a child nine years pre- 
viously ; none since. Pulse 64. She was treated exclusively by 
means of the Spinal Ice-bag and infusion of calumba. 

Jan. 25th. — The pains across the loins and between the 
shoulders had quite ceased ; had still a little pain beneath the 
shoulder-blade ; the pain at the base of the brain was less violent, 
and that in the temple was less frequent ; the leiacorrhoea was 
much lessened ; appetite improved ; bowels " relaxed this two or 
three days." 

March 18th, 1870. — The pains across the loins and between 
the shoulders had never returned ; the pain in the back and base 
of the head had also ceased ; the pain iu the right temple recurred 
very rarely ; leucorrhoea " very much lessened ; " menstruated to 
the day at the end of a month last time, but the flow was not per- 
ceptibly increased. It was not preluded by any pain in the back ; 
the pain in the womb was much lessened ; she had no diarrhoea, 
and did not retch at all. The feet had become quite warm ; 
appetite much improved ; bowels quite regular. Treatment dis- 
continued. 

Case 61, — Facial Neuralgia ; Inadequate Sleep ; Coldness of 

the Feet. 

Mrs. B., aged twenty-seven, who consulted me by letter Jan. 
14th, 1870, suffered from trigeminal neuralgia, the left side of the 
head and face being chiefly affected, and the left eye and cheek- 
bone most especially ; sometimes, and often suddenly, the pain left 
the left cheek and occupied the right. The pain, which was ex- 
tremely severe, and prevented the patient from sleeping, was most 
violent from ten p.m. till three a.m. The pain first came on in 
March, 1868 ; ib continued during some months, and left her 
after the hot weather set in ; it returned about Christmas of the 
same year, troubled her more or less during the winter, and again 
left her in the summer. Her bowels had a tendency to be costive, 
and she "suffered greatly from cold feet." Catamenia normal. 
She had several decayed teeth. 

I prescribed the application of the eight- inch Spinal Water- 
bag — temperature 115" F. — to the cilio-spiual region each night 
when the attack was about to come on, and at other times when- 
ever she felt any warning of impending pain. In January, 1871, 
her husband informed me that " the application of the bag 
generally soothed the pain," and that that winter, " for the first 
time for three winters," there had been " only slight premonitory 
twinges, which had not come to any head." I never saw the 
patient, and prescribed for her, by letter, but once. 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 117 

(.^ASE 62. — Headache; Backache; Ovarian Neuralgia ; Gra- 
dual and Com.plete Cessation of the Catamenia ; Profuse 
Leucorrhcea. ; Habitual Coldness of the Feet. 

Feb. 12tli, 1870. — Mrs. F., aged twenty-five, complained of 
great and persistent pain in the lumbar region, and in the right 
hypogastric region ; she also suffered from headache — at the vertex, 
from frequent sickness, and profuse leucorrhcea ; had not men- 
struated during the previous three months. Before her marriage, 
seven years previously, her menses were copious, and without pain ; 
since that event they had gradually lessened in quantity and dura- 
tion, and had been accompanied with intense pain : latterly, they 
generally lasted only one day — never more than two — and during 
the whole period she suffered acutely. Since their cessation three 
months ago her general health has become increasingly impaired, 
and the ovarian pain has become especially distressing. Appetite 
" very bad ; " tongue fairly clean ; pulse feeble ; feet habitually 
very cold. She was treated exclusively by the Neuro-dynamic 
method — no drug being given. 

Feb. 18th, 1870. — Pain in the back and in the right ovary 
lessened ; leucorrhcea lessened ; sickness lessened ; appetite im- 
proved. The use of the ice had caused no discomfort. 

March 30th.— The pain in the lumbar region had quite ceased; 
the ovarian pain was scarcely felt ; headache and sickness quite 
gone; leucorrhcea had become so slight that she said, — "It's 
nothing to speak of now." Felt decidedly warm all over. Appe- 
tite greatly improved. Treatment discontinued. 

Case 63. — Neuralgia of the Ears and Face ; Headache ; 
Feeble Appetite; Deficient Catamenia; Leucorrhcea-; 
Coldness of the Feet. 

April 21st, 1870. — Mrs. C, aged forty-six, applied to me when 
suffering from unceasing pain in the head — " all over it." The 
ears and teeth were extremely painful : the pain in them seemed 
to correspond, she said, with that of the head. The pain had 
lasted five or six months, and was so horribly severe at night that 
she often walked about the room, being imable to rest in bed. 
She said, " I get about a quarter of an hour's sleep, and then lie 
awake nearly all night." The appetite was " very bad ; " but the 
bowels were regular. She had menstruated very slightly three weeks 
previously ; and during the previous six months the flow had been 
very deficient. Before that period it was copious. She suffered 
very much from coldness of the feet, and had been troubled with 



118 NEITRO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED: A SERIES OF 

leucorrhoea during the last two or three years. Pulse 80. She 
had pleurisy, and was nine weeks in hospital a year before she 
consulted me. She was treated by means of the Spinal Ice-bag 
until the end of May, no medicine being given. She improved 
steadily, and some time before that date had become quite free 
from both neuralgia and headache. 

June 18th — nearly tlu-ee weeks after the treatment had been 
discontinued — the patient had had no return of pain of any kind ; 
her appetite was improved ; the catamenia had become more 
copious, and, respecting her leucorrhoea, she said it was " nothing 
compared with what it was " before she came under my care. 
Referring to the general effect of the treatment, she remarked, 
" It's done me a wonderful deal of good." 

Case 64. — Intense Headache ; Infra-marmnary, Ovarian, and 
Uterine Neuralgia ; Severe Backache ; Giddiness ; Re- 
tarded and Deficient Catamenia ; Profuse Leucorrhjxa ; 
Varicose Veins ; Chxat Coldness of the Feet. 

June 18th, 1870. — Ann C, aged eighteen, domestic servant, 
complained of pain in the left breast, in the left ovarian region, 
and in the lower part of the back : she had been troubled in this 
way during about eight months; she added, "And I suffer to 
stupefaction in the back part of mj^ head ; " she often felt giddy ; 
menstruated about two days, and very slightly, at intervals of 
five, six, and seven weeks ; had extremely severe menstrual pains, 
lasting about forty-eight hours ; leucorrhoea very profuse, and 
increasingly so during the previous nine months ; the veins at the 
iipper and inner side of the calf Avere in a,n extremely varicose 
condition, and the leg was often very painful ; her feet were 
markedly cold. She was treated solely by the Neuro-dynamic 
method. 

June 28th. — The pain in the breast had gone, and the back- 
ache had much lessened. She said, " I've not seen none scarcely 
of them whites since I've used the ice. My leg is not so painful 
as it was. My feet are very hot,— just as if they were inside of 
an oven." 

July 5th. — The pain in the left breast had not recurred ; that 
in the left ovary had quite ceased. She only felt the pain in the 
back now when she awoke in the morning. The pain in the back 
of the head and the giddiness were much lessened. Menstruation 
came on June 30th, and continued three days. She found that 
without the Spinal Ice-bag she had great pain ; but that when 
she got up, replenished it with ice, and reapplied it, it gave her 
immediate and great relief The leucorrhoea had quite ceased. 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 119 

June 27th. — Was quite free from pain. Had menstruated 
again much more copiously, and after a shorter interval than 
formerly. The menstrual pain lasted during one night only ; but 
she was sure that if she could have got ice she should have had 
no pain, because at the previous period the ice immediately 
stopped the pain. The leucorrhoea had not returned. The treat- 
ment was discontinued at this date because she was so much 
better, and because, as she confessed, she was unable to pay for 
more ice. 



Case 65. — Violent Headache ; Intense Cutaneous Irritation ; 
Sickness ; Drum-helly ; Profuse Leucorrhoea ; Prolapsus 
Uteri ; Stoelling of the Lower Extremities ; Prolonged, 
Absence of Perspiration. 

Mrs. B., aged forty-eight, consaited me June 20th, 1870, when 
suffering from a copious erythematous eruption {erythema papu- 
latum) diffused over her face, neck, arms, and hands ; she also 
complained of violent headache, and of retching and vomiting, 
which were especially troublesome each morning. When nine 
years old she was attacked by a dog, and was extremely frightened ; 
she seemed to lose all her strength, became speechless for a time, 
and, when she recovered her power of speech, she was unable to 
speak without stuttering until about three years after her fright. 
About six or seven days after it she suffered from an eruption 
like that which troubled her when she consulted me. Ever since 
the first attack she had had, on an average, two attacks of the 
same disorder each year. " Before each attack I seem," she said, 
" to sicken for it three or four weeks, and 1 have headache — a 
kind of swimming or dizziness, often taking away my ej^esight, 
and making me almost delirious." She frequently experienced, 
she said, a sudden stiffness in her limbs during the same pre- 
liminary period. She declared that she never perspired, and 
that so far as she could remember she never had since the period 
of her fright, however hot the weather might be. She added 
that when she got over-heated her skin burnt in an indescribable 
way, making her feel as if she ought to be bled, and that after- 
wards it cracked in those places which had been most troublesome, 
as if it had been inflamed. This statement was confirmed by her 
sister, whom I also saw when the patient first consulted me. She 
complained, too, that her abdomen was habitually and largely 
swollen, and that this disorder disti-essed her greatly. She had 
suffered from leucorrhcea for many years : her business com- 
pelled her to stand during the greater part of each day, and the 
discharge was so profuse that it saturated her stockings, and often 



120 XEURU-DYIS'AMIC MEDICINE EXEMI>LIFIEU : A SERIES OF 

compelled her even to change her boots. She menstruated regu- 
larly, and with but little pain. She suffered from habitual pro- 
lapsus uteri, the mouth of the womb often protruding through 
the OS vaginae. Aching in the back and a distressing sense of 
bearing down were incessant ; she was also much troubled with 
swelling of the legs every day. I ordered the application of ice 
along the whole spine during sixty minutes three times a day — 
the morning application being continued during and after her 
breakfast, which, on many previous mornings, she had vomited. 

June 21st, 8 p.m. — The patient reported : — "No sooner had I 
applied the ice than the itching ceased almost instantaneously, 
and the soreness [of the parts where the rash had broken out] 
ceased with the itching — both ceased. The ice was very comfort- 
able — qiiite refreshing." It was applied on the first occasion in 
the evening. The patient slept well, though the night was ex- 
tremely hot. She awoke heated and irritable ; " but," she said, 
"' as soon as I put the Ice-bag on again the itching ceased directly, 
as quick as I am telling you. Before dinner I drank some stout, 
which broiight the itching on again, and immediately I applied 
the ice the irritation ceased. This evening I had no irritation 
whatever, but reapplied the bag, because I thought I ought, and 
should like to do so again." Not only had the irritation and 
soreness ceased, but quite two-thirds of the eruption had faded 
away. The patient said, " The relief I felt from the ice I can't 
describe." She had the ice on during breakfast, dinner, and tea, 
and reported, — " I had no sickness whatever — not the least of it." 
She was extremely astonished to find that she had had no leucor- 
rhoea to-day : she said, " I have never kept so clean and comfort- 
able during any day for eleven years past." I ordered the Spinal 
Ice-bag to be continued as before during an hour three times a day. 

June 22nd, 8.30 p.m. — The patient had felt no itching since 
that caused by the stout yesterday. Last night she took both 
beer and wine. She had " a very comfortable night, and woke 
this morning full of energy." She was still quite free from both 
sickness and headache. She said that had her present attack 
been allowed to continue during the hot weather thcp prevailing, 
she knew, from previous experience, that without the ice she 
would have been half delirious, and that having had a very 
bustling, anxious day, she would have been obliged to go to bed. 
With the exception of a little swelling over the left malar bone, 
there was scarcely a trace of the eruption left. The leucorrhcBa 
had quite stopped ; and the swelling of her legs, whicli, as she 
said, had been an every-day experience, had not occurred during 
the previous two days. She was perspiring freely, and in conse- 
quence was feeling, she said, " unspeakable relief" The sweat 
was gently diffused all over her ; the bearing-down was lessened. 



GASES ILLUSTKATING ITS PEINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. ] 21 

June 23rd, 8 pm. — The eruption was wholly gone, and the 
patient had remained free from discomfort of all kinds ; she had 
observed on her linen only one spot of leucorrhoeal discharge ; 
and she continued in gentle perspiration. I requested the ice to 
be applied only twice daily, morning and evening. 

June 27th, 9 p.m. — The patient continued free from leucorrhcBa 
till the previous day, Sunday ; then, having no ice, she could not 
use the Spinal Ice-bag, and then the discharge recurred in almost 
full force. She applied the ice to-day as ordered, and to-night she 
said that since the first application to-day she had had scarcely a 
trace of the discha,rge ; she was still free from sickness and head 
ache, and the " bearing-down was much lessened." The treatment 
previously prescribed was continued. 

July 4th. — The patient reported herself quite well. The skin 
was clear, and her complexion and general aspect were much 
improved. She said, "■ I feel different, — I can't describe it ; I 
feel more light-hearted ; I feel that I can do anything ; I perspire 
nicely, and the bearing-down has ceased." 

July 23rd.— She had continued well in all respects, except 
that during the previous five mornings she had observed a slight 
sangTiineous stain on her linen, just as if she were beginning 
to menstruate. Her abdomen was now so reduced that she v^^as 
quite proud of her improved appearance. She had no "bearing- 
down whatever ; " the swelling of the legs had not recurred, and 
she continued to perspire freely. Throughout the period of 
treatment the bowels had acted daily. 

July 29th. — The slight sanguineous discharge had quite ceased. 
The patient said that, in consequence of the state of her womb 
before I began to treat her, she could not lift any heavy weight, 
but that now she could do so with ease, and that she was alto- 
gether much stronger than she had been for man}^ years before. 
During the five weeks of treatment I prescribed no medicine' 
whatever. 

Comment. — This was the first case of an erythematous eruption 
which I had treated, and probably the first that had been treated 
by means of the Spinal Ice-bag. Holding the views I have else- 
Avhere expressed concerning tlie part played by the nervous system 
in the process of textural nutrition generally, and therefore in the 
nutrition of the skin, I was prepared for the result recorded ; 
indeed, it was because I anticipated it that I eagerly persuaded 
the patient to allow me to treat her as I have described. 

The cessation of the chronic swelling of the lower extremities 
recorded in this case may, perhaps, be accounted for by saying 
that when the general health of the nervous system was improved, 
its influence over the textural nutrition, and therefore over the 

K 



122 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 

systemic capillary circulation was sure to be improved also. I oiler 
tins suggestion as a provisional explanation, which seems to be 
satisfactory, but which increasing knowledge may, of course, prove 
to be incorrect. 

The most remarkable phenomenon in this remarkable case was, 
however, in my opinion, the production of perspiration by the use 
of the Sj)inal Ice-bag. I call this phenomenon the most re- 
markable because, as a general rule, while heat along the spine 
tends to promote perspiration, ice tends to stop it. I explain the 
production of perspiration by means of heat along the spine by 
assuming that what I call the " positive motor nerves," presiding 
over the sweat-glands, are, by the influence of the heat, rendered 
additionally active ; but, of course, this assumption involves 
another, viz., that cold to the spine operates in the contrary way, 
and as a matter of fact it generally does so. But here is a case 
in which ice along the spine caused a person who, during many 
years, had suffered much from the want of perspiration, to perspire 
freely. How is this ? I can offer no explanation with confidence 
that it is correct. To me the phenomenon remains as mysterious 
as it is interesting, and shows how much we have yet to learn of 
the nature of the relation between the nervous system and the 
processes of secretion, especially the process of perspiration. It 
has, however, seemed to me possible that since the fright and 
shock sustained by the patient, the delicate muscular tunic of the 
blood-vessels supplying the sweat-glands, or it may be of the ducts 
of those glands, had remained in a condition of chronic spasm, 
and that the effect of the ice, by abolishing the morbid irritation 
of the vaso-motor nerve centres, consisted in releasing that mus- 
cular tunic from the influence of that irritation, and thus in 
allowing it to assume that state of healthy dilatation which is a 
necessary condition of normal .perspiration. I must add, however, 
that this is not the only case in which perspiration has been pro- 
duced by the use of ice, but it is the only case, so far as I know, 
in which the patient was previously suffering from a burning 
skin. Of course, in cases in which the skin, before treatment, 
is markedly anaemic and cold, owing to vigorous contraction of 
its blood-vessels generally, ice to the spine, by putting a stop 
to that contraction, will cause the sweat-glands, as well as the 
other parts of the skin, to be supplied with blood, and will 
thus make the skin warm, and re-establish perspiration at the 
same time. 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITf5 PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 123 



Case 65 a. — Violent Headache; Cutaneous Irritation, ivilh 
Eruption ; Sickness ; Lcucorrlicea ; Prolapsus Uteri. 

Mrs. B., the patient whose case is described in the immediately 
preceding narrative, came to me again in April, 1872, and 
stated that she was sufiering from an eruption like to that of 
which she complained when she first came to me. She was also 
suffering in like manner as before, from intense headache, sick- 
ness, leucorrhoea, and prolapsus uteri. The eruption was chiefly 
confined to her face, the exposed part of her neck, her arms and 
liands — on the latter the elevations were studded together much 
the most closely. The accompanying irritation was scarcely as 
troublesop-ie as it had been on the occasion when she formerly 
consulted me. Her headache during the onset of the eruption 
was so peculiarly intense that she feared to come to me lest she 
should fall on the way. She stated that she had as a rule re- 
mained, during the period since her previous attack, quite free from 
both leucorrhoga and the bearing-down of the womb, but that if 
at any time either or both of them came on, she resumed the 
use of the Spinal Ice-bag, it proved as completely effectual in 
remedying them as it did when she first applied it. 

On this occasion I asked Dr. Liveing to see the patient with 
me, and then requested her to apply the Ice-bag along the 
whole spine four times a day, and to meet us two days afterwards 
at his house, so that we might see the result. We saw her, and 
to my surprise found the eruption in much the same state as it 
was in before the Spinal Ice-bag was applied. On inquiry, I 
ascertained that it had not been applied at all along the most 
important part, viz., the cervicad spine, but only along the dorsal 
and lumbar regions. The continuance of the eruption in the 
same state as before, and of the itching which she complained of 
was thus, as it seemed, fully accounted for. She was then care- 
fully instructed to apply the ice thoroughly to the cervical region, 
and especially to allow the air, which accumulates at the top of 
the bag, to escape from time to time, so as to permit the ice to be 
applied closely to the spine. Having duly fulfilled these injunc- 
tions, she presented herself to us the following morning, and re- 
ported that, as last applied, the Spinal Ice-bag had again quickly 
allayed the cutaneous irritation, and that she felt in all respects 
better. 4^he eruption itself was also rapidly declining, and, the 
treatment being continued, soon completely disappeared. Owing 
to the presence of leucorrhoea and prolapsus uteri, the Spinal 
Ice-bag was used about three Aveeks, twice a day, after the erup- 
tion had ceased, and at the end of that time both those maladies 
had quite ceased also. 

K 2 



124 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 

Case 66. — Great Pain a.-ul Sense of Pressure in the Head ; 
Extreme Droiosincss ; Intercostal Neuralgia ; GastraJgia ; 
Severe Menstrual Pain ; Retarded and Profuse Men- 
struation ; Leueorrhma ; Coldness of the Feet. 

Amelia R., aged twenty-nine, a cook, came to me December 
14tli, 1870, complaining of pain over the surface of the left wall 
of the thorax : the pain was not stationary, but moved about, and 
was intermittent. When she moved her head quickly, or looked 
up suddenly, she also felt a dull pain at the pit of the stomach ; 
and a somewhat similar pain Avas produced below the left mamma 
each time I pressed on the lower dorsal spine. She also suffered 
every day from a sense of pressure and great pain at the top and 
back of the head, with a feeling of extreme drowsiness. She men- 
struated every sixth or seventh week profusely, and with great 
pain in the hypogastric region : this she had suffered from during 
many 3^ears. She was troubled with leucorrhoea occasionally ; and 
her feet were often very cold. She had been treated by three 
medical men in succession without being benefited. I advised her 
to apply ice along the entire spine sixty minutes each night. 

Dec. 29th. — She reported that she had not felt at all for some 
days any of the pains she complained of December 14th : she 
could now move her head in any direction without causing pain ; 
even pressure on the spinous processes would not cause pain below 
the left mamma, as at the previous date ; pain and pressure in the 
head had completely gone. She began to menstruate on the 24th 
inst., which was onlj' a mouth after the previous period. She said — 
" I had very little pain — I don't know whether it is because I used 
the ice, but I don't know when I've had so little pain." She was 
quite sure she had had much less leucorrhoea since using the ice ; 
and said, — ■" I feel much better, in all respects, and stronger." I 
now requested her to apply the ice, in one cell only of the Spinal 
Ice-bag, to the dorso-lumbar region each evening, and to take ol. 
morrhua?., 5^-) b. d., also ferri et quiniB cit., gr. v. ; aq., §ss., b. d. 

Jan. utb, 1871. — The patient declared she had felt no neuralgia 
wbatever during the previous fortnight. "In fact," she said, "I feel 
quite well, with the exception of this pain in my chest " — a slight 
pain at the apex of the left lung. I requested her to continue 
the ice to the lower third of spine, and the medicine as before. 

Jan. 12th. — lieported herself quite free from pain, and well in 
all respects ; she was stouter and stronger, and quite cheerful, 
whereas formerly she suffered from depression of spirits. 

Jan. 26th. — Began to menstruate exactly at the end of four 
Aveeks from the beginning of her previous period. The total 
amouut of the flow had lessened ; she felt well in all respects. 



CASES ILLUSTR\TING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 125 

She said, — "It's astonishing how much stronger I've got — not 
for the last two years have I been so strong as during the List six 
weeks." Treatment being no longer necessary was discontinued 
at this date. 



Case 67. — General Neuralgia with Total Supi^ression of the 
Gatanicnia during Memn Years. 

Mrs. , aged forty-one, whom I saw for the first time, Jan. 

IG, 1871, was suffering from general neuralgia: she said, "It's 
over every nerve in my body, I can't express it in any other way." 
The chief seats of pain w-ere around the ears, now on one side now 
on the other; along each of thj four extremities — though raxely at 
the same time ; in the right side ; and along the back. The pain 
in the back was at once the most agonizing, and the most con- 
tinuous. The pains generally consisted of a long succession of in- 
tense and quickly recurring paroxysms with more or less severe 
aching during the intervals ; sometimes when a paroxysm came on 
while she was walking she felt as if she must fall and was obliged 
to get into a cab immediately ; she felt, she said, as if the flesh 
were being torn from the bone. After she came under my care I 
had frequent opporteinities of witnessing her suffering which she 
bore with wondrous heroism : she wrestled most determinately 
with her enemy which seemed as if intent on forcing from her a 
cry of agony which, as a rule, she resolutely suppressed ; but 
sometimes, in spite of her, the tears suddenly started from her eyes, 
and occasionally an audible expression of pain when extraordina- 
rily sudden and acute escaped her. By no effort of her will, 
however, could she prevent the spasmodic and quivering move- 
ments of her limbs which accompanied and revealed her suffer- 
ings. Indeed, the voluntary motor nerve centres had become- 
largely involved in the disorder which affected her, a fact proving 
at once how extensively the disease had become rooted in the 
spinal cord and how difficult Avould be its eradication. The 
hands and ankles, and sometimes the face, swelled when the pain 
was more especially concentrated upon them. If she played the 
piano the hands swelled almost immediately ; she was therefore 
obliged to give up playing altogether. ¥/hen the head and 
face were painful there was often considerable lachrymation, and, 
also, secretion from the nasal mucous membrane. She was gene- 
rally free from headache, and though almost all her teeth were 
carious she never suffered from toothache. Her chest was healthy. 
The appetite was extremely feeble, and sickness was easily in- 
duced. The bowels were prone to he constipated ; and she suffered 
" very much " from flatulence, most so at night when she swelled 



126 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED: A SERIES OP 

very much. She had not beeu troubled with leucorrhoea during 
the preceding six years. The menses liad been completely sup- 
pressed during the preceding eleven years. She suffered much 
from coldness of the lower extremities, the laiees as well as the 
feet being particularly cold. Her tongue was fairly clean, and her 
pulse, which was 80 per minute, was very steady. I was rather 
surprised to find that her spine was especially tender on pressure 
only in the lower dorsal region. 

She had her first child when she was twenty-four years 
old, and her second when she was thirty, or eleven years 
before I first saw her. A year or two before the birth of 
the second child she suffered from neuralgic earache, and 
during her second pregnancy she was troubled with neuralgia of 
the limbs. About three months after the birth of the child she 
began to feel very severe pain in the dorso-lumbar region, so 
severe that on one occasion it seemed to paralj'-se her, and she had 
to be carried to her bed from a carriage in which she was riding ; 
the pain continued with terrific severity for three days during 
which she kept her bed. A few weeks afterwards she was attacked 
with severe pains in her legs. After this period pain recurred at 
intervals of a week or of several weeks sometimes in one part of 
the body, sometimes in another. During the ten years before she 
consulted me she had rarely passed more than* a few hours, and 
never more than a few days without pain which moved from one 
part of the body to another, but which was always especially 
severe when it attacked her back and limbs. Her suffermgs had 
reached their maximum severity six years before I saw her, and 
continued with the brief intervals of respite already mentioned 
until that time. She menstruated ciuite regularly and naturally 
before she conceived the second time, and she suckled the child — 
although the quantity of milk was iusuflicient ; but on the occa- 
sion of the severe attack when she was carried from the carriage 
to her bed she was advised to cease suckling ; she did so, and 
from that time she had never menstruated again. She had no 
pain in the pelvis, and neither any displacement nor any organic 
disease of the womb could be discovered. She was formerly re- 
markably well nourished and quite plump ; but during the five or 
six years before I saw her she had steadily decreased in flesh and 
had become extremely thin ; the muscles of her extremities were 
extraordinarily attenuated. 

Notwithstanding all this suffering her constitution was really 
so little impaired that when she was freed from pain for only a 
few hours she seemed to recover at a bound her wontedly high 
spirits, and even her physical vigour so as to be able to walk 
several miles. 

She had had the utmost help which medicine could give, and 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 127 

every variety of treatment wliicli could be suggested by the several 
medical men who had attended her. Prussic acid, Indian hemp, 
arsenic, strychnia, belladonna internally and externally, subcuta- 
neous injections of morphia, galvanism, the actual cautery applied 
along the spine twenty -five different times, leeches applied to the 
womb six times, and the waters of Harrogate and of Aix-la- 
Chapelle, besides various other remedies had all been tried and 
had proved of no real avail. Such being the case a merely pal- 
liative treatment chiefly by means of opium and alcohol was 
finally resorted to, and I was assured by the patient that for 
about three years immediately before I saw her such sleep as she 
had had each night had been obtained by the help of some narcotic 
agent — generally laudanum. 

She came to London for the express purpose of submitting to 
my treatment which was continued from the date of her arrival, 
Jan. 16, until the middle of May, 1871, when she returned home. 
The use of narcotics, and of stimulants (excepting a glass of beer 
with her food or a small quantity of wine occasionally) was rigo- 
rously withheld. The active treatment consisted mainly in the 
regular application of ice to some part or to the whole of the 
spine as from time to time having regard to the changing sym- 
ptoms, I thought most expedient ; a systematic and prolonged use 
of warm baths ; and the administration of various medicines 
which I thought might co-operate to achieve the end in view. 
Galvanism (the continuous current) was also used for a short 
time, but proved of no real service. 

The being deprived of narcotics, and of alcohol (except in the 
limited quantities just mentioned) was felt by the patient at first 
as a great trial, which, however, the systematic use of the Spinal 
Ice-bag rendered tolerable ; she soon began to sleep without their 
aid, and before many weeks had elapsed she slept normally 
throughout each night — often during six, seven, or even eight 
hours — sometimes even without waking once. As a general 
rule, liable, however, of course, to exceptions, this habit, after 
being re-acquired, continued while the patient remained under 
my immediate care. 

The pains she suffered gradually became less severe : she ceased 
to have pain in her back March 2nd, and became free from pain 
in all parts in the middle of May. 

The menstrual function was re-established April 22nd ; and, 
having ceased suddenly immediately after I galvanized the face, 
neck, and upper part of the spine in the evening of that day, 
recurred during the daytime of the 24th. 

The patient's appetite was thoroughly restored, and she gained 
flesh to an extent equally gratifying and surprising. She told 
me. May 13th, that her cousin, who had not seen her since she 
came to London, visited her on that day, and that he exclaimed 



128 NEURO-DYNAMIO MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED: A SERIES OF 

" How stout you've become ! I should not have known you. 
How wonderfully better you are looking ! " And her husband, 
when he came to fetch her home, remarked, " I don't remem- 
ber her at any time to have had so good an appetite as she has 
now." He also said, '' Certainly, I don't think she has had so 
much flesh on her as she has at present for five or six years past." 
Moreover, after their return home he wrote me a thoroughly 
satisfactory report of her. 

But soon after she was settled at home she began to suffer again 
severely, though she was still able to say, " My nights are very 
good." She returned to London in August, and again came 
under my personal care. She did not progress so rapidly on this 
as on the former occasion ; but she improved greatly : she gene- 
rally slept well, she recovered much of the good condition she 
had w'lien she left London in May, and in December she passed 
many days either entirely free, or almost entirely free, from pain. 
The menses contin\ied to recur, and at nearly normal intervals ; 
on the last two occasions of which I have notes they recurred on 
the 29th of October, and again on the 19th of November, so that 
three weeks elapsed between the periods of their recurrence. On 
the last occasion they continued five da3^s, and 'were especially 
copious and of thoroughly healthy colour. 

It was decided that she should again return home ; but before 
the date fixed for her return arrived, she had a sudden relapse : 
her pleasing and healthy expression of countenance changed, her 
face appeared dark and congested, and her sufferings became very 
severe again. Indeed, the change was so rapid and so great that 
I could not help thinking it must have originated in some mental 
trouble. She went home at the time appointed, and I regret to 
say that when T heard from her last she was still suffering (to 
what extent I do not know), notwithstanding that the menstrual 
function has been thoroughly re-established. 

Comment. — This case presents some remarkable and peculiarly 
instructive features. Although the menses had been wholly sup- 
pressed during eleven years, the patient suffered rarelj^, if ever, 
from headache ; although both her jaws were full of decaying 
teeth--most of them mere stumps, some of which had abscesses 
at their roots — she never suffered from tooth-ache ; and although 
she had long suffered excruciating pains in the back, together 
with suppression of the menses, she had not been troubled at ail 
during the five or six years before she consulted me by leucor- 
rhoea. Seeing the state of her teeth, I thought it probable that, 
though she felt no pain then, they produced a great amount of 
irritation of the nervous system, and thus favoured the continu- 
ance, if they did not cause, her neuralgia ; accordingly, I advised 
their extraction when she came under my care the second time. 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 129 

But thougli slie said she experienced a feeling of relief of a kind 
slie could scarcely describe, and, after being supplied with artificial 
teeth, could masticate her food far more thoroughly than before, 
the improvement effected in her mouth exerted no appreciable 
influence in lessening her neuralgic sufferings. Again, the long 
suppression of the catamenia might fairly have been regarded as 
an adequate proximate cause of those sufferings, and yet the com- 
plete re-establishment of the menstrual flow which I anxiously 
sought to effect failed to put an end to them, although it un- 
doubtedly conduced to lessen them, as welj as to improve the 
general health of the patient. 

It seems to me that the facts of this case forcibly illustrate the 
truth which I have elsewhere insisted on,- — that when a morbid 
condition of the nervous centres has been induced, and has per- 
sisted a considerable time, that condition is apt to become esta- 
blished in the organisation as a habit, and, as such, is likely to 
remain even after the complete removal of the cause which origi- 
nally gave rise to it. Whether in this case the carious state of 
the teeth and the suppression of the menses operated jointly or 
separately as causes of the neuralgia, or whether it was due to 
some other cause, it is manifest that the disease was so wrought 
into the nervous centres as to have become, as it were, "a second 
nature " obstinately persisting after its seemingly probable causes 
had been removed ; and that, having assumed an independent 
existence, it needed, after their removal, long and patient battling 
with in order to effect its thorough destruction. This considera- 
tion made me regret that when, on the first occasion, it was 
thoroughly subdued but not yet destroyed, the patient returned 
iiome in Ma)^, 1871 : had the treatment and regime then prac- 
tised been vigorously persisted in under my personal superintend- 
ence during a few months longer, the neuralgic habit of twelve 
years' duration might, I think, have been abolished ; but the, 
patient's return home so speedily after it had been subdued 
enabled it to acquire a new lease of life, and when she returned 
to me a great part of the battle, which had already been fought 
successfully, had to be fought over again. And on the second 
occasion I experienced a similar disappointment. 

But notwithstanding the absence of complete and permanent 
success in this remarkable case, the experience of the efficacy of 
Neuro-dynamic medicine which it afforded is very striking and 
instructive : the terrific pains which had tormented the patient 
during a long series of years were wonderfully subdued ; she was 
enabled to dispense with those previously necessary evils — nar- 
cotic medicines — and to have from six to eight hours of healthy, 
refreshing sleep almost every night ; and her menstrual function, 
after eleven years of total suppression, w^as completely re-esta- 
blished. 



130 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 



Case 68, — Ueaclaclie ; Hyioogadric Neuralgia ; Su'iypression 
of the Catamenia ; Faintness ; Leucorrhoea ; Coldness of 
the Feet. 

February 4tli, 1871. — Miss G., aged twenty-six, single, com- 
plained of headache, lasting several days together, and of fre- 
quently recurring and severe pain in the hypogastrum. She was 
also liable to sudden attacks of " faintness, " when her face 
became pallid. She had menstruated since the previous 
November. She suffered from remarkable coldness of her 
feet; her hands were clammy, and she was wont to feel cold 
generally. Tongue fairly clean ; appetite feeble ; bowels regular. 
Pulse 82. 

During three or four years before her catamenia were sup- 
pressed altogether they were very deficient — only two napkins 
being needful at each period ; and on each occasion she suffered 
intense pain in the forehead, and in the lower 2J<^^^t of the back 
during four or five days. I prescribed the application of the 
Lumbar Ice-bag to the dorso-lumbar region during an hour three 
times a day. No medicine. 

March 6th. — Her headache had lessened, and her hypogastric 
pain had quite ceased ; the leucorrhoea had also ceased. Her 
feet had become warm, and she slept much better than she did 
before using the ice. Pulse 87. She was now requested to apply 
ice in each cell of a twenty-inch Spinal Ice-bag along the whole 
spine each morning, and in the upper two cells of the same bag 
along the lower two-thirds of the spine each afternoon and even- 
ing during ninety minutes. R Infusi calumbee, §j., bis die. 

April 3rd. — The headache ceased early in March, and, after 
recurring slightly on the 18tli and 19th, had not been felt again. 
Her appetite had improved. She was requested to continue the 
ice as before. R Olei Jecoris, 5ij-) ^is die. 

May 1st. — Had continued free from headache until this date, 
and felt better, she said, after each application of the ice. She 
was requested to continue it and the cod-liver oil as before, R 
Pilulse aloes et ferri, gr. v., omni nocte. 

May 22nd. — Menstruation began on the 19th, and continued 
till the night of the 2 1st. The discharge was of normal colour, 
and more copious than formerly — four napkins being necessary. 
During this period she had pain neither in the back nor in the 
womb. Prescription same as before. 

July 2nd. — An intimate friend of the patient called to inform 
me that she was in every respect quite well, and would have 
called herself had she not been obliged to go out of to-wn in order 
to make arrangements respecting her coming marriage. 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 131 



Case 69. — Painful ExcitccbilUy of the S'lnnal Cord; Head- 
ache; Facial, Cervical, and Uterine Neurcdgia ; Nausea 
and Vomiting ; Diarrhoea ; Leucorrhcea ; Deficient and 
Intermittent GaJamenia ; Coldness of the Feet. 

Miss T., aged twenty-five, who consulted me 27th February, 
1871, v^'as suffering from excessive excitability of the v^diole spinal 
cord. She had measles when fifteen years old, and since that 
time she had been troubled with neuralgia of the right temple 
and along the nech. It had been increasing in frequency, and, 
for full six months before she came to me she had suffered every 
uiglit from the pain. Generally it did not begin till she v/ent to 
bed, but if she was very tired it began earlier : it lasted from two 
to four hours. She said, — " It seems to go back from my temple 
into my neck, and then it goes away." JDuring the presence of 
the pain the affected parts vv^ere especially tender. She suffered 
from ordinary headache about once a week on an average ; but at 
lier catamenial pe3:'iods it was very severe for two or three days 
successively. She had pain in the lower half of the spine, ex- 
tending round to the left side of the abdomen, " more or less, 
nearly always," but it was greatly intensified at her catamenial 
periods. She had excessively severe pain in the womb, as well as 
in the back, during two or three days at each period, which lasted 
from seven to ten days. The flow, however, was both intermittent 
and deficient. During each of her periods her stomach and 
bowels v/ere extremely irritable : she felt nausea the whole time, 
if she ate anything she vomited immediately, and she was 
always troubled with diarrhoea. Her appetite was habitually 
very feeble ; her bowels were generally rather relaxed ; she was 
troubled with leucorrhcea during the whole of each catamenial' 
interval " verj- much ;" and her feet were almost invariably cold. 
Her power of walking was very slight : for a long time she could 
only walk a few yards at a time ; latterly she had been able to 
Avalk daring ten or twenty minutes, but not without feeling 
fatigue. Pulse 100. Pressure on the sixth and seventh cervical 
vertebriB caused agony, and pressure on every part of the spine 
was aluiost intolerable. I prescribed in the first instance heat 
along the upper and cold along the lower part of the spine, and 
• afterwards the application of ice only. 

March 10th, the patient had just passed through her menstrual 

period : she had had less pain, less sickness, and no diarrhoea ; 

she was moreover able to eat, and to keep her food. The warm 

Avater bag made her feel sleepy. Pulse 80, soft and full. 

• March 27th. — She had continued the use of the Spinal Ice-bag 



132 jSteuro-dynamic medicine exemplified : a series of 

as prescribed, except during three da3's, when the ice was omitted. 
She said, — " I like the ice : it sends me to sleep, and, if applied 
when the neuralgia is bad it generally relieves it." 

April 19th. — She reported herself very much better : she had 
been quite free from neuralgia about half the whole number of 
nights which had passed since her previous visit. Had again 
been " unwell," and again, was " not nearly so sick " as formerly. 
The use of the Spinal Ice-bag was continued throughout her 
period, and " comforted her," she said, " very much." The pain 
in her back had lessened, and her feet had become " decidedly 
warmer." 

May 8th. — Had had no neuralgia at all for a week together — 
an experience she had not had for months before. Her headache 
had become less frequent. The back was still less painful, and 
had become stronger ; she could walk better. During the pre- 
ceding fortnight the bowels had been opened only once a day. 
The leucorrhoea had greatly lessened, and the increased warmth 
of her feet continued. 

I regret that I did not see this patient again : she stayed 
in or near London while I treated her ; but she was obliged 
to return to her home in the North of England immediately 
after I last saw her. I gave her such general instructions 
as seemed to me expedient concerning her further use of the 
Spinal Ice-bag ; but what further progress she made towards 
complete recovery I never heard. 



Case 70. — Headache; Singing in the Ears; Distressing Hy- 
pcrmsthesia of the Right Hip ; Neuralgia of the Testicles 
and Perinccum ; B eaJcness and Emaciation of the Loioer 
Extremities; Partial Impotency ; Excessively Frequent 
Micturition ; Constipation of the Bowels. 

William T., aged fifty-nine, came to me on March 1st, 1871, 
complaining of a distressing sensation immediately above one of his 
hips, "as if a plaster covering a raw surface were being torn oft'." 
He had also acute darting pain in the perineum and both testicles, 
especially when he v^as engaged in lifting an}^ considerable weight. 
He urinated with excessive frequency ; and was obliged to get up 
three or four times each night to pass water. He said, — " I've 
pain all down my legs at times " — sometimes for several days 
together and becoming much worse at night. Complained also of 
violent pains in the head, and " singing in the ears " when he 
stooped. The legs and arms had become weaker and smaller than 
formerly : he could stand on each leg separately with difficulty. 



CASlilS ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLlSt; AND PRACTICE. 133 

Bowels constipated, except when lie had recourse to aperients. 
Sexual power very much impaired. The patient was employed 
ill an oil merchant's business, and had frequently to lift iron 
"drums" of oil amounting to 56 lbs. weight. Two years previously, 
when suddenly lifting one of these drums, he felt a " very, very 
acute pain like a crick " in the lumbar region of the spine, which 
caused a feeling of stiffness for a few minutes, and so incapacitated 
him generally that he was obliged to go home : he was disabled 
from work altogether during the week following. Previous to the 
accident the patient enjoyed good health in every respect — the 
bowels acting regularly ea,ch day. 

The treatment in this case was solely by means of ice, and was 
continued only twenty -three days. At the end of that period, 
viz., March 25th, the patient reported that the sensation of sore- 
ness over the hip, and the pain in the perineum and testicles were 
quite gone. Urination much less frequent ; during several nights 
previously he had not got up at all to make water. The pains 
and weakness in the limbs had ceased, " except perhaps a little 
bit of a twitch sometimes " when he lifted anything. He had had 
neither pain in the head nor singing in the ears since the end of 
the first week of treatment : he declared that he did his work as well 
as ever he did in his life, and walked home a mile to dinner, and 
a mile back again, whereas, before 1 saw him, he could not at- 
tempt it. He remarked, — "' I feel altogether a different man. It 
is a very strange thing that such a cure can be made without any 
medicine." At this date the treatment was discontinued, as the 
patient said he felt no further necessity for it. 



Case 70a. — Hypercesiliesia, associated with Small-pox. 

March 6, 1871. — Mrs. W., a young married lady, of fair com- 
plexion and considerable beauty, requested my advice. I found 
that she was suffering from small-pox, and that the eruption, the 
nature of which the patient had not recognised, had made its ap- 
pearance three days previously. The whole body was covered 
with papules, which, however, were crowded together most 
thickly over the lower part of the trunk. The eruption in the 
face was so considerable that it was not possible to insert the top 
of the finger between the papules ; and below the orbit on each 
side they were more or less confluent. There was considerable 
fever, very severe headache, intense irritation over the surface of 
the body, and the patient was extremely restless and excitable. 
The previous night she had been delirious. 

On the 2nd of March the patient took a walk, and returned 
home shivering, and complaining generally of malaise — could eat 



134 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 

notliiDg, and went early to bed. The next morning she felt very 
sick, retched violently — though unable to vomit, and complained 
of very severe backache. On the following day, the 4th, there 
were superadded to these symptoms intense headache, and the 
first appearance of the eruption. The distress increased, and on 
Sunday, the 5th, the j)atient was excessively irritable and excited 
— could not be kept in bed, and towards evening became decidedly 
delmous ; and on the following morning, as already mentioned, 
I saw her professionally for the first time. She. was treated by 
means of the Spinal Ice-bag, which was applied differently at 
different times, according to the varymg conditions of the patient's 
cerebral circulation. 

The effect of the cold in subduing the itching of the papules 
was almost magical. If she felt irritation ever so intensely, and 
the ice were at that time applied, within five minutes after- 
wards the irritation ceased, and the patient was altogether soothed 
and calm. The effect, in fact, v/as so delightful to her that, as 
soon as the ice in the Spine bags had melted, she prayed that they 
might be immediately replenished. This as a general rule was done, 
and during the whole of six consecutive days, and the greater part 
of the corresponding nights, she lay on ice continuously. At the 
end of that time the energy of the disorder having been spent, 
and its incidental irritation having been proportionally lessened, 
the ice was applied less and less continuously, but was used daily 
during full five weeks altogether. Throughout her convalescence 
she found it so comforting a,nd refreshing that she Avas unwilling 
to dispense with it. 

Convalescence steadily proceeded without one untoward 
incident, and the disease which had inspired her with inex- 
pressible dread lest it should permanently disfigure her, left no 
distinct trace of its presence. There were, indeed, for a time 
a few places in which, when the patient made any extra exertion, 
or expressed any strong mental emotion, hypersemic or congestive 
spots appeared ; but gradually these ceased to be observable, 
and finally the face seemed not to be marked at all, unless it 
v;ere scrutinized very closely, when a few whitish spots very 
slightly pitted could be discovered on that part of the face 
where, when I first saw the patient, I observed the jjapules to be 
confluent. 

The sedative influence exerted by the Spinal Ice-bag on the 
intensely itching papules was so remarkably powerful and decisive 
that my experience in tins case alone compelled me to ask myself 
whether it is not probable that that influence may be used to re- 
tard their development, and actually to impede or arrest the 
march of the disease itself. A preparation of glycerine was in 
the first instance applied over the skin from time to time, and the 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 135 

patient s£iid it gave lier momentary relief ; but it was of no real 
avail in permanently lessening the irritation, and, as already 
mentioned, she would not rest during the first period of her ill- 
ness unless the ice were being applied. 

In connection with this case and the use of the Spinal Ice- 
bag, I may mention that during the early period of the patient's 
illness each of the three servants who were in the same 
house with her began to be troubled with a very pronounced 
" malaise," nausea, and vomiting, one of them being confined to 
her bed a whole day. I treated all three in the same manner, 
namely, by persistent application of ice along the spine. At the 
end of three days they were all fairly well again, and had no 
relapse. 

Case 70b. — Hypermsthesici', Delirium, and SkeijUssness, asso- 
ciated vjith Small-pox. 

During the convalescence of the patient whose case is num- 
bered 70a, I was called in consultation concerning another case 
of small-pox. The patient, a literary gentleman, was far ad- 
vanced in the disease when I at first saw him. 

He was covered with papules, which were fully developed. He 
was violently delirious, and insisted upon walking incessantly 
about his room stark naked. His medical attendant had pre- 
scribed narcotics, which, however, liad proved of no avail. 

Having advised the discontinuance of drugs altogether, I ap- 
plied a short Spinal Ice-bag along the lower half of the spine, and 
another across the occiput. In a few minutes the patient was 
fast asleep ; I then advised that the ice should be continuously 
applied in like manner until the mental excitement should be 
thoroughly subdued, and then at intervals, gradually increasing 
in length. The patient was scarcely delirious at all after the first 
sleep produced by the ice, and during each succeeding night he 
slept several hours. The effect of the cold in subduing the exces- 
sive hypergesthesia from which he suffered was not less remarkable 
than was that recorded in the case previously described. 

The results of the Neuro-dynamic treatment of small-pox, 
which are exhibited in the foregoing cases, are so important that, 
on public grounds, I think it my duty to print the following letter 
from the patient v/hose case is numbered 70b : — 

"Dear Dr. Chapman, 

" I have very great pleasure in bearing my testimony 
to the very satisfactory operation of the Spinal Ice-bag in 
mitigating the dangerous delirium, sleeplessness, and high fever 



136 NEUr.O-DYNAMlO MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SELIES OF 

of small-pox. My own experience of the disease and of the 
remedy entitles me to speak. 

" When yon were called in, in March, 1871, to advise upon my 
case, I had been utterly exhausted by long-continued _ and 
violent dehrium, based upon the most clistressing and persistent 
delusions, and accompanied by restless impatience at confinement 
to bed, as well as by inability to obtain sleep. I had fruitlessly 
been sickened with opiates, and the alarming symptoms showed 
no signs of abatement wdien you were called in and prescribed 
the Ice-bag. 

" I shall never forget the grateful and almost magical effect of 
the bag when first applied. It almost instantaneously produced 
a refreshing sleep, from which I woke with the delirium and the 
delusions gone, with a restful sense of repose, with no tendency to 
rave or to leave my bed, and with a general feeling of increased 
strength ; subsequently the delirhim slightly returned, but the 
Ice-bag in every instance produced sleep, and dispelled the delu- 
sions from which I suffered. During convalescence, whenever I 
felt weak or perceived my mind to be wandering, I called for the 
Ice-bag, always with the same beneficial result. I should add 
that the bag also acted with wonderful effect in cooling the 
temperature of the face, and in preventing the irritation from the 
pustules during their disappearance. If at any time I felt dis- 
posed to rub or scratch my face, I was able to combat the desire 
successfully by an application of the bag. 

" You are at liberty to make any use you please of my testi- 
mony on this subject. 

"I am, dear Dr. Chapman, yours very truly, 

"E. D. J.Wilson." 



Case 71. — Severe Fcdn in the Dorso-lmnhar Region; Chronic 
Cough ; Headache. 

March 25th, 1871. — John H., aged fortj^-four, complained of 
severe pain in the dorso-luinbar region ; he had suffered from it 
between three and four months : it was especially severe when he 
stooped at his work — that of a ladies' boot finisher. He had also 
a severe cough, and frequently a headache, which he thought Avas 
caused by its paroxysms. He always had a cough in the winter, 
but this year it had been " dreadful bad." I advised him to apply 
the upper cell of the Lumbar Ice-bag along the lumbar spines, 
until the ice should be melted, each night. R tjyrupi ferri iodidi, 
5j., bis die ; Olei morrhuaj, §ij., bis die. 

April 4th. — The pain in the back was almost wholly gone. He 
said, — " I feel a great deal better : I can now sit down* to work a 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 137 

few hours ; I couldn't a fortnight ago because my head was so 
bad. If I stooped down I had giddmess." Appetite "wonder- 
fully improved." Pulse 94. The cough was not improved after 
using the ice. I advised him to continue the same treatment as 
before. 

May 23rd, 1871. — The pain in the back was quite gone, and, 
therefore, the treatment by means of the Spinal Ice-bag was dis- 
continued. 



Case 72. — Great Pain at the top of the Sacrum; Extreme 
Tenderness along the Dorso-lumhar Parts of the Spine ; 
Sleeplessness ; Vomiting, 

March 29th, 1871. — John B., aged thirty, complained of pain 
at the top of the sacrum. The pain was much increased by stoop- 
ing, and was brought on seven days ijreviously, when he strained 
himself by carrying an unusually heavy load : he said, — " The 
bag went over my head ; it ricked me in the back, and I've been 
queer ever since. I can't sleep at all scarcely because of the pain." 
Since the accident he had vomited the greater part of each meal 
" a few minutes " after taking it. He felt worst when lying down, 
and vomited most in the mornings. The whole of the lower half 
of the spine was very tender — great pain being caused by pressure 
on it. I requested him to apply a twenty-four- inch Spinal Ice-bag 
along the whole spine, till the ice should be melted, three times a 
day. 

April 8th, 1871. — He used the Spinal Ice-bag as ordered. At 
this date he had no pain whatever, and no sickness ; he ate well, 
slept well, and in all respects felt quite well. The tenderness of 
the spine was completely gone. He said, — " I can stoop or do 
anything now, sir." Treatment discontinued. 



Case 73. — Cutaneous Disease of the Right Side of the Nech 
and of loth Hands, with Intense Hypermsthesia ; Great 
Tenderness along the whole of the Cervical Spines. 

April 24th, 1871.— Cecilia B., aged seventy, had a red eruption, 
slightly papulous, on the right side of the base of the neck, about 
twelve lines long by eight broad, which appeared about five weeks 
previously ; it was extremely irritable, especially when she became 
warm. She had also a like patch, but larger, on the radial side of 
the back of the right hand, and a smaller one on the palm of the 
same hand, ' The latter was rough and desquamating. The ulnar 

L 



138 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 

half of the pahn, the base of the thenar eminence, and the whole of 
the anterior part of the wrist, and jjart of the dorsal surface on 
the radial side, were covered in like manner. These parts on the 
left hand appeared as if they were recovering from a burn ; they 
were denuded of cuticle, were cracked, felt peculiarly tight, and 
were very red and glossy. She had not suffered pain in these 
parts — only intolerable "prickly itching," and a feeling of intense 
heat: she said, — "They are so hot — so burning hot." There 
was gi^eat tenderness of the whole of the cervical spines, pressure 
on the second caused most pain ; and the structures on each side 
of the lower cervical spines were swollen and tender. Three 
months previously the patient cut her left wrist on the ulnar side, 
longitudinally ; the wound was about two inches long, and was 
deep ; it was made with a piece of a wine glass, which she broke 
while cleaning it. The wound healed in about a month : in about 
another month the disorder began near the wounded part with 
intense itching ; it gradually spread, and three weeks ago appeared 
in the right hand. I requested the patient to apply ice along the 
whole cervical region ninety minutes three times a day. 

May 1st. — The eruption on the neck was markedly lessened, 
and the irritation of the part had almost ceased. The patches 
on each hand had become very much smaller, and the irritation 
complained of was "wonderfully lessened." She had used ice 
only twice a day. She was requested to use it three times a day. 
I also prescribed an ounce of infusion of calumba to be taken 
twice a day, and an ointment of the acetate of lead to be applied 
to the hands twice a day. 

May 9th. — The patch on the neck was all but gone ; the hands 
were very much better — the redness had nearly disappeared ; the 
dorsal surface of the left hand was quite well — that of the right 
hand nearly so. Treatment as before. 

May 16th. — She had had no irritation whatever since I last saw 
her. The skin of the neck was well ; but tenderness was evinced on 
pressure of the lower cervical vertebrse. The left hand looked Avell 
except that the skin, which was now pale, looked as if it had but 
recently, though completely, recovered from the effects of a burn. 
The dorsal surface of the right hand on the radial side was the 
least completely healed. I requested the ice to be continued as 
before, and prescribed ferri et quin?e cit., gr. v. ; aquse, §ss., bis die. 

June 23rd. — The neck was quite well, and the patient felt no 
tenderness when considerable pressure was exerted on the cervical 
spine. The hands were quite well also, except a very slight rough- 
ness about the size of a shilling in the left palm. Treatment dis- 
continued. 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 139 



Case 74. — Headache, with distressing Heat at the Top of the 
Head ; Fains in the Loioer Extremities ; Frequent Flush- 
ings, follovxd hy general Coldness ; Hausea and Vomiting ; 
Insufficient Sleep ; Coldness of the Feet. 

April 25th, 1871, Mrs. L., aged forty-eight, complained of 
" burning pain " at the top of her head, of pains in her lower 
limbs, of " burning-heats " which came over her, of sickness and 
sleeplessness. She had long been a frequent sufferer from ordi- 
nary headache, but the '' burning-pain " at the top of the head, 
which she described as peculiarly distressing, she had suffered 
" almost daily " during about a month immediately before she 
came to me. The "burning-heats " began to distress her at fre- 
quent intervals about twelve months previously ; about four 
months after they came on her catamenia ceased, and two months 
after their cessation her flushes or burning-heats, which had be- 
come very frequent, began to be followed by nausea, often also by 
vomiting, and afterwards by general coldness. These extremely 
distressing alternations of circulation and temperature recurred 
about every hour in the daytime : after experiencing the " burn 
ing-heat " all over her she felt sick, often vomited, became ex • 
tremely cold, and suffered from severe aching of the lower 
extremities. She was troubled during the night in much the 
same way : ''I keep awake half the night," she said, " with those 
burniug heats, and after the heats are gone I get very cold." Her 
appetite was " indifferent ; " her bowels " pretty regular ; " her 
feet were " nearly always cold." She was treated by means of the 
Lumbar Ice-bag and, in the first instance, took ammonii chloridi, 
gr. viii., infusi calumbse, §ss. ter die ; pilulfe aloes cum myrrha, • 
gr. v., omni nocte. The medicines were discontinued in the middle 
of May ; but the ice was used until the beginning of September. 

May 9th. — The pains in the limbs were " not near so great as 
formerly." The " burning-heats " now came over her only three 
or four times a day, and they went off more quickly than before. 
The nausea and vomiting had quite ceased. The feet were much 
warmer; and she slept " a great deal better." Appetite greatly 
improved. 

September 5th. — The pains in the limbs, the burning-pain at 
the top of the head, the burning-heats which came over her, the 
sickness, nausea, and feeling of coldness, had all quite ceased. 
Her feet continued quite warm ; she slept well, and in all respects 
felt well. 



L 2 



140 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 



Case 75. — Violent Headache ; Frequent Giddiness; Sleepless- 
ness ; Menial Disorder ; Nausea ; Frequent Micturition ; 
Sudden Flushes and Frofiise Ferspiration ; Hahitiial 
Coldness of the Feet. 

May 13th, 1871, I was consulted by Mr. N. P., aged forty-nine, 
whose principal complaint was overwhelmingly severe and per- 
sistent headache. The pain was chiefly at the top of the head, 
and was associated with a feeling of pressure in that part and at 
the back of the eyes, which felt as if they would be forced out. 
While the pain was very severe he felt inclined to sway backwards 
and forwards, not from any wish of his own, he said, but invo- 
luntarily : he said, — " I can't help it, and am rather more 
inclined to go backwards than forwards." He had never lost his 
consciousness, but had staggered, and had often felt giddy. His 
sleep was very insufficient and unrefreshing, and generally when 
he awoke he had headache. He was prone to despondency, which 
sometimes assumed the character of melancholia with suicidal 
tendencies, which became especially strong if he found himself 
near a river, a cliff, or any other precipice. He often suffered 
from nausea, and sometimes from vomiting. When his at- 
tacks were severe and prolonged he passed limpid urine very 
often — on many occasions not less than a dozen times a day. 
The top of his head felt abnormally hot ; he said it was always 
excessively hot, and that for a considerable time past he had been 
obliged to bathe it with spirits and water to keep it cool. The 
crown of the head was becoming bald. During his severe attacks, 
whether by night or day, he became extremely red in the face, 
his eyes became bloodshot, and he felt, he said, just as if he were 
standing before a fire. Moreover, he was often troubled with 
general and sudden flushings, and then immediately afterwards 
he broke out into a profuse sweat "from the crown of the head 
to the soles of the feet." His feet were remarkably and habitually 
cold. 

About twenty years before the patient consulted me he had 
had t)rphus fever, and since that time he had suffered from head- 
ache at frequent intervals. During his best times he generally 
had headache, on an average, two days out of six. Throughout 
the first seventeen years of the period in question the pain was 
chiefly in the forehead : only during the three years before he 
came to me the pain had been seated at the top of the head. 
His severe attacks were becoming increasingly frequent and pro- 
longed : at the date when I first saw him he declared that the 
attack from which he was then suffering had lasted three weeks 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 1-il 

uninterruptedly, and that, in fact, he was " seldom clear " in his 
head. _ His eyes were generally so blood-shot during his attacks 
that his children could always tell when he was suffering more 
than usual. _He had long held a very responsible situation, but 
during a considerable time before he first consulted me he had been 
wholly incapacitated from discharging his business duties. 

The Neuro-dynamic treatment of this patient, which involved 
the application of heat as well as cold to the spine, was continued 
uninterruptedly from the middle of May to the end of November, 
1871, and during a part of this time was the only treatment 
adopted. In the course of the treatment, however, I prescribed 
at different periods in succession iodide of potassium, bromide of 
potassium, bromide of ammonium, chloride of ammonium, tinc- 
ture of calumba, sulphate of beberia, and aperient pills. No 
appreciable help was derived from the three first of these medi- 
cines ; I thought the chloride of ammonium Avas, perhaps, of 
slight use, but the sulphate of beberia proved, I believe, of real 
value as a co-operative agent in accomplishing the cure which 
was effected in this case. 

I shall not trouble the reader with a detailed report of the pro- 
gress of this patient, whom for a long time I saw weekly, but 
will merely state the result. He improved steadily, and by the 
end of October had become so well that at that date he resumed 
his business duties. The treatment was, however, continued 
another month, and meanwhile he was able to work from 8 a.m. 
to 8 p.m. without feeling any evil effects from doing so. In the 
middle of December — a fortnight after treatment had been 
wholly discontinued — he called upon me and said that his strength 
and appetite were good, that he was in excellent spirits, and that 
he was as well as ever he had been in his life, except that he was 
still liable to have a slight headache in the morning occasionally, 
and to flush when he was excited. 

July 29th, 1872, I saw this patient again. He rej)orted him- 
self to be continuing well : his eyes were quite clear; his appetite 
was good ; his bowels were regular ; he slept fairly well ; and he 
was gaining flesh. During the very hot days of the previous 
week — the thermometer being at 92° in the factory he superin- 
tended — he felt a little giddy ; but, by applying ice as before, he 
quickly regained his usual health. For a long time previously 
he had taken no medicine, and only occasionally had he found it 
necessary to resort to the Spinal Ice-bag. 



142 N^URO -DYNAMIC MEDICINE exemplified: A SERIES OF 



Case 76. — Neuralgia of both the Upper Extremities ; Pain in 
the Temples, hetioeen the Shoulders, in the Loiver Part of 
the Back, and in both Hips ; JVicmhness and Sioelling of 
the Hands ; Fainting Fits ; Impairment of Sight and. 
Memory ; Leucorrhma. 

May 24th, 1871, Mrs. V., aged forty-nine, suffered from neu- 
ralgia of both her ujjper extremities. She was in pain the greater 
part of each day. The pain in the left limb was the worst. The 
pain generally began in the first phalanx of the middle finger of 
the left hand ; but sometimes the fingers of the right hand were 
first affected. In either case the pain extended completely from 
the fingers to the shoulders. Both sides were often, but not 
always, attacked at the same time. The attacks began so sud- 
denly, that if she had anything in her hand she was obliged to 
drop it unless it were taken from her ; the veins of the limbs, 
and especially of the hands, rapidly swelled, and the hands them- 
selves became red ; the arms seemed to be immediately paralyzed. 
She said, " The pain comes on as a fearful numbness : if I had 
my choice I'd rather go through my labour pains than bear what 
I have to suffer of a night." She often sat up a considerable part 
of the night from fear of the pain coming on as soon as she be- 
came warm in bed, for then the paroxysms were most prone to 
recur — " all of a sudden." She also suffered from pain between 
the shoulders, and often in the temples. 

The disease came on about eight years before she consulted me, 
when she had, she said, "a coldness" of her right elbow, and 
"couldn't get it warm, and seemed to lose the use of the arm." 
Pain followed the coldness and weakness, and recurred at in- 
creasingly frequent intervals. During the previous twelve months 
she had never passed a week without attacks. She said, " I 
always find them come on after I've been doing anything." She 
had been obliged to give up her ordinary domestic work, and for 
many months past has been unable to dress herself; she could 
scarcely walk a dozen yards. She said, " If I attempt to walk, 
the pain comes across the hollow of my back, right down to the 
lowest part of it, and in both hips dreadfully, and the pain 
between my shoulders — I can hardly bear it." When attempting 
to walk but a very short distance she was obliged to stand still 
several times. Between two and three years before I saw her she 
began to have "fainting-fits," always brought on by the pain in her 
hands, arms, back, and shoulders. Indeed, sometimes the pain 
seemed, she said, to be all over her. Any excitement, worry, or 
considerable physical exertion induced a fresh attack of pain, 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 143 

which, becoming intense, was soon followed by faintness. She 
felt, she said, as if the use of her limbs were suddenly taken 
quite away. She became very cold during each fit. Generally 
while she remained cold, prostrate, and helpless, she knew what 
passed around her, but she could not speak ; often she lost her 
consciousness more or less, sometimes completely. " Then, after 
I get better of the fit," she said, " I come over of a fearful flush." 
Since these fainting-fits began, they had recurred several times a 
week ; sometimes she suffered from them two or three times a 
day. Both her memory and her visual power were much im- 
paired. Pressure along the spine showed the whole of it to be 
extremely tender ; but the region of the fourth and fifth cervical 
vertebra was horribly so. Appetite feeble ; bowels regular. 
Menstruation ceased eleven months previously. She had been 
troubled with leucorrhoea since her first child was born, sixteen 
years before she consulted me. 

The treatment of this complicated case extended through several 
months : the Spinal Ice-bag was the chief agent relied upon, and, 
indeed, was the sole agent until July 7th, when I also prescribed 
cod-liver oil. Subsequently she took small doses of chloride of 
ammonium, and during the latter period of treatment citrate of 
iron and quinine. Warm baths were also used occasionally. 

May 31st. — The pain had lessened considerably both in dura- 
tion and intensity. On the third night of using the ice the pain 
was so much lessened that the patient slept four hours. She said, 
" I've not slept so for months, and my hands have not been drawn 
up : I can now hold anything." The veins were less distended, 
and the limbs were less swollen than before. 

June 22nd. — She used the Spinal Ice-bag as directed pretty 
steadily until the 16th inst., and meanwhile continued quite free 
from pain each night, and slept nearly the whole of each night con- 
tinuously. " Indeed," she said, " I can sleep at any time in the 
daytime now. I fancy the ice draws you to sleep ; I don't know 
whether it is fancy." The pain in the daytime had recurred much 
less frequently, had been much less intense, and had continued a 
much shorter time than formerly. She had been many days with 
out pain ; but she thought the numbness was not lessened. There 
was still less "puffing-up" — as the patient called it — of the veins, 
and swelling of the hands. The pain between the scapulse was 
much lessened ; but that across the loins continued " very bad." 
On the 16th inst. she ceased using the Spinal Ice-bag because 
she was unable to get ice ; on the 18th she became very ill, and 
" fainted away with pain ; " on the 21st she fainted twice from 
the same cause, and lost her consciousness completely ; on the 22nd 
she resumed the use of the ice. 

June 29th. — She had become very much better : she had been 



144 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 

three days without any pain at all, and had neither fainted nor 
felt faint since the date of her previous report. She said, " I've 
been better altogether this last week than I've been for months." 

July 7th. — She continued to improve. At this date she re- 
marked, " My memory and my eyesight are better." 

July 17th. — She said, " I get a full night's sleep generally now. 
I may wake sometimes, and even lie awake a couple of hours, — 
but not in pain, as I used to do." She had also passed many 
days without having any decided attack of pain in the daytime. 
What she continued to be troubled with was " more numbness 
than pain." In reply to my inquiry what evidence she could 
give me of improvement in her arms, she said, " Why, being able 
to use them. For many months before I saw you I could not 
dress myself; now I can do so easily, and can use my needle." 
She added, " When I used to go to bed and drop asleep, I woke 
up in agony ; now I never do so." She reported also that her 
appetite was much improved. 

July 26th. — She informed me that for some time previously 
she had rarely had any pain in the upper extremities ; but that 
she still felt the numbness in her hands, and to some extent in 
lier arms. She had gained greatly in general strength, and espe- 
cially in her power of walking. At this date she could walk 
quite easily from her house to mine — a distance of upwards of a 
mile — without any pain at all. She had also acquired the habit 
of sleeping as soon as she went to bed and sleej)ing till morning. 
The leucorrhoea had been steadily lessening, and during the pre- 
vious fortnight she had not been troubled with it at all. 

August 9th. — She had been to Sheerness, and since she last 
called upon me had been without ice. She was not so well again, 
and ascribed her relapse to omission of the ice ; she had pain and 
swelling in the hands again, and the pains had recurred in her 
elbows, " but not so violent as before." She still felt very well 
in herself She promised to resume the use of the ice without 
delay. 

Sept. 13th. — By my request she had six decayed double teeth 
extracted a few days prior to this date ; she thought the numb- 
ness had been a little lessened since. She continued to have 
good nights. 

Sept. 22nd. — She thought she had caught cold ; she felt the 
Spinal Ice-bag cold, and her chest becoming uncomfortable, I 
advised her to suspend the use of the Ice-bag, and to take a warm 
bath at 98° F. during an hour every other day. 

Oct. 4th. — At this date she had been without ice three weeks. 
The numbness in the hands had returned almost as bad as ever, 
and the pain was beginning to return. She was also sleeping less 
Avell again : but otherwise she felt Avell. She had had no return 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PllINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 145 

of the leucorrhoea. I advised her to apply the top cell of the 
Spinal Ice-bag along the cervical spine till the ice should be 
melted, three times a day. 

Oct. 25th. — She reported that she had continued the ice regu- 
larly as directed, and that she had remained quite free from pain, 
unless when she did heavy work — washing, for example. She 
could do ordinary house-work without any pain at all, ancl had, she 
thought, been able, except at the times mentioned above, to do so 
during the previous three months. She still felt the numbness, 
but it Avas markedly lessened ; she had had no more fainting-fits, 
and continued quite free from leucorrhcea ; she slept all night 
every night, and so soundly, too, that even the alarm of fire on 
the previous night quite near her (in Hare Court, Temple) did 
not awake lier. She was, in fact, in all respects better than she 
had been for many years. I recommended her to continue the 
treatment previously prescribed. 

Jan. 29th, 1872. — The patient followed my directions during 
a few days only after I last saw her, and then, continuing to feel 
remarkably well, left off the use of the Spinal Ice-bag, and had 
not since resumed it. Excepting during a few days at the end of 
the previous month, and again just before coming to me on this 
occasion, she had passed the previous three months without pain. 
In both instances the temporary recurrence of the pain was caused 
by the labour of washing. Otherwise, she had been astonishingly 
Avell : she said, " I hadn't even the numbness, or that dead feeling 
in the spine of my back," and no one of the other ailments from 
which she suffered when she first consulted me had returned. I 
advised her to apply ice again if the pain should recur, and pre- 
scribed, ferri et quinse citratis, gr. v. ; olei morrhuse, 5ij-5 bis die. 

March 4th. — She had not found it necessary to use the ice 
again : she had not been troubled with pain, unless she brought , 
it on by doing some especially hard work, and then it was com- 
paratively slight. She looked thoroughly well, and said she felt 
so. Her complexion and expression Avere Avonderfully improved. 
I advised her to continue the medicines last prescribed some 
time longer, and to re-apply the Spinal Ice-bag as before if the 
neuralgia should recur. 

July 1st. — I saw this patient for the last time at this date : 
her condition and report were essentially the same as at the 
previous date. She could do all ordinary domestic work without 
suffering ; only when she exerted herself violently did she expe- 
rience any pain. In other respects she continued perfectly well. 
During the preceding half-year she had used ice very rarely ; but 
if, on any occasion, after inducing the recurrence of pain for a 
short time by extra exertion, she re-applied the Spinal Ice-bag, 
she obtained speedy relief. 



146 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 



Case 77. — Severe Gouty Pain, vnth Svjelling and Stiffness of 
the Right Knee and Foot, and. Pain in the Left Foot. 

William S._, aged forty-six, consulted me May 30, 1871, when 
lie was suffering from a very severe attack of gout in the right 
knee and foot, and also, though less severely, in the left foot. 
The knee was greatly swollen, very red, acutely painful, and 
could not be bent at all. The right foot was also much swollen, 
and very painful ; the left, though not appreciablj^ swollen, was 
decidedly painful. I prescribed a simple aperient mixture, and 
the application of ice along the dorso-lumbar region, during an 
hour and a half, three times a day. 

The effect of the treatment in lessening the pain was distinctly 
manifest during the first day ; and in about thirty-six hours after 
the treatment began the patient could partially bend the affected 
knee. The pain and swelling steadily and simultaneously declined, 
and at the end of five days had wholly subsided ; and, mean- 
while, the knee-joint became perfectly flexible. The Spinal Ice-bag 
was used as prescribed during seven days ; and then I pre- 
scribed ferri et C|uin8e, gr. v., ter die. The patient remarked, — 
"I cannot describe the suffering I was in before I put on the ice, 
which seemed to drive the pain away." 



Case 78. — Severe Pain over the Chest, in the Shoulders and 
Four Extremities, loith Rigidity of the latter, aiid other 
Symptoms of Disorder of the Sinnal Cord. 

Mrs. E., aged twenty-nine, consulted me 30th May, 1871, 
when she presented the following symptoms : — Her arms and legs 
became "stiff" every morning, and generally continued so until 
the afternoon, when they became more or less relaxed. She said, 
— " If I get anything in my hands I don't feel as if I can hold it, 
and my hands become stiff." She suffered from a peculiar tight- 
ness about the chest ; the feeling, she said, " seems to come on as 
if everything were strapped on me, and the pain goes up the left 
side of the neck, and I become quite stupid." She suffered great 
pain in the chest, shoulders, arms, and legs : she said it was most 
severe in the chest, shoulders, hands, and ankles, and that some- 
times it affected her " in the stomach, and around the heart." 
When the pain came on severely she felt as if her mouth were 
drawn open, her face and eyes felt tight, she was troubled with 
lachrymation, and oppressed with drowsiness. The pupils were 
rather dilated ; she suffered frequently from sickness ; she passed 



CASES ILLTJSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 147 

water about three times an hour during the day. Pulse 120 ; 
the hands were tremulous and jerky. About a month before I 
saw her, having gone to bed fairly well, she found on the following 
morning that she was unable to get up, owing to great weakness 
and pain in the shoulders, chest, and legs — the pains in the legs 
were of a darting character : such was the sense of pressure on 
the chest that on one occasion she had her clothes cut open be- 
cause she thought they produced it. When the attacks came on, 
she broke out into a violent sweat every morning, and this symp- 
tom had continued — though in a less pronounced form. Three or 
four weeks before she was attacked as described^ she felt pain 
along the spine — most severe between the scapulae and extending 
to the sacrum. The pain, she said, "was not a starting pain, but 
a dreadful pressing pain, that came on first in my back as if the 
strings of my clothes were tied behind, and as if the knots were 
pressing in my back : it affected my breath, — it seemed as if I 
could not get my breath ; my husband gave me brandy, but it 
made me worse ; I tried rum and milk, but it seemed to make 
me a great deal worse. When I attempted to wash the steps with 
a flannel, I could not move my arms, and so v/as obliged to give 
it up." About three weeks before she consulted me her skin, 
especially over the chest, was very irritable, and in that region 
there were several " red flat spots." I directed the application of 
ice over the whole length of the spinal cord three times a day, 
each application to be continued until the ice should be melted. 
No medicine. 

June 6th. — The pains along the middle of the back had much 
lessened, as also had the rigidity of the limbs, and she could hold 
things in her hands much better ; she had no longer any feeling 
of tightness over the face ; the tightness over her chest was greatly 
lessened, and the pain in the thoracic and abdominal parieties 
was also much less severe. Pain in the limbs was still consider- 
able. She felt much stronger generally, and her sickness had al- 
most ceased. Moreover, she was making water not more than six 
times a day. Pulse 100. She was directed to continue the 
ice as before, and to take aperient pills when her bowels were 
confined. 

July 11th. — Pain in every part of the body had quite ceased ; 
all sense of rigidity or stiffness had also subsided. The head still 
felt " thick " sometimes, but she had ceased to feel sleepy in the 
day time. She was making water only four or five times during 
the day — not at all at night. The tremors and jerks of the hands 
had also quite ceased. Perspiration normal. She was directed 
to apply the Spinal Ice-bag as before, but only twice a day, and 
still to keep her bowels open daily by means of aperient pills if 
necessary. 



] 4:8 NEUKO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SEllIES OF 

August 2nd.— The Spinal Ice-bag was used about half-a- 
dozeu times after the date of the previous report. The patient 
dedared herself completely relieved of all her troubles. Treat- 
ment discontinued. 



Case 79. — Sciatica on Ijoth the right and left Side; Severe 
Pain in the Loins ; Headache ; Giddiness ; Mental 
Heaviness and Depression ; Habitued Constipation of the 
Bowels and Coldness of the Feet. 

June 26th, 1871, Louis C, aged thirty-four, was suffering from 
sciatica chiefly in the right leg, but often in the left. The pain 
began about three months previously in the left leg, especially along 
the anterior part of the thigh, but soon became most pronounced in 
the right. The pain was worst near the ischiatic tuberosity, and 
was also extremelj^ severe in the calf on the peroneal side, and 
along the inside of the foot. The paroxysms were most severe each 
evening, so severe that the patient feared to move himself in any 
way, and often remained bent forward. Pressure on the ham in 
sitting down, or coughing, augmented the pain extremely. He 
was always in pain while awake, but only in the evenings, as a 
rule, did the severe paroxysms come on. Movements, however, 
brought them on at other times. He complained of great pains in 
the loins which he felt to be very feeble. Often he had the sen- 
sation of "pins and needles" on the peroneal side of the right leg. 
The patient also suffered from headache several times a week ; 
the attacks were often of the nature of hemicrania, and were ac- 
companied with giddiness, heaviness, and a longing for sleep. 
When he did sleep he slept too heavily, and^ was fatigued by it 
and. depressed. He said, "ilmesemble toujours que j'ai envie 
de pleurer." He had a feeling as if his chest Avere forcibly com- 
pressed. Appetite good. Bowels open only every second or third 
day. Feet habitually cold. 

The treatment in this case, during the first month, was ex- 
clusively by means of the Spinal Ice-bag. 

July 31.— He had been ten days quite free from pain. His head- 
ache had ceased. His bowels were open daily without the use of 
aperient medicine. He reported himself " tout-a-fait bien." His 
feet had become quite warm. His loins were then so strong that 
he could walk a considerable distance without either pain or 
fatigue. He remarked, however, that he did not sleep very Avell. 
I advised him to continue the application of the Spinal Ice-bag, 
and to take Potassii bromidii, gr. x., aquse camphorae, gj., each 
night. 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 149 

This patient returned to France and I did not see him again 
after the above date, but the lady who advised him to consult 
me has since informed me that when she afterwards heard from 
him he continued Quite well. 



Case 80. — Severe Brachial Neuralgia ; Headache and Back- 
ache ; Deficient Sleep ; Smarting Pain in the Eyes ; Cough 
. with Copious Ex23ectoration ; Sickness ; Leucorrhma ; Pro- 
lapsus Uteri ; Unduly frequent Micturition ; Coldness of 
the Feet ; Great Tenderness of the whole Spine. 

Mrs. 0. S. E., aged forty-five, complained, July 13, 1871, of 
constant pain from which she had suffered since the previous 
November in the thumb, thenar eminence, wrist, and along the 
arm up to the shoulder of the left side. It was most acute in 
the thumb, and was greatly increased by walking and by the 
supervention of menstruation. The pains also extended, but less 
severely, down the left leg, along the right arm, and into the 
right thumb. The left arm felt painfully heavy, it also felt 
numb, and was always much the most painful at night ; she was 
constantly liable to severe pain in the back which was always re- 
produced by walking ; she suffered from an almost constant and 
peculiar headache, a feeling, she said, as if her head would burst ; 
had always been a bad sleeper, but her nights had become " much 
worse " at the time she consulted me. Her visual power had 
greatly declined during the preceding six months ; she could just 
make out test-type H, she read 3 with difficulty, and 3^^ with fair 
ease ; she had smarting pains in the eyes, "as if," she said, " she 
had'nt had enough sleep. She had a cough with considerable' 
expectoration which was especially copious in the mornings. 
Tongue thinly furred. Appetite " very bad ; " she was frequently 
sick, the mere sight of eatables often produced nausea, and from 
the time she first began to menstruate she had always been sick 
at her periods. The bowels acted regularly. The catamenia re- 
curred regularly once a month and continued a Aveek each time. 
During the first two or three days of her periods she suffered great 
pain in the back, womb, and thighs, " in fact, all round," she 
said, as well as from sickness. Leucorrhoea she was always 
troubled with during the whole of each catamenial interval ; she 
had a constant sense of bearing down of the womb; "when I 
walk," she said, " I feel as if it were all open — so peculiar, when 
it's worse my cough is very violent." She was obliged to rise 
each morning about four to urinate ; and needed to pass water 
very often in the daytime, but sometimes could not when she 



150 NEURO-DYNAMIO MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 

tried, and then was only enabled to do so by sitting over hot 
water. Her feet were habitually and excessively cold ; in the 
winter they were never warm, and even in July, when I first saw 
her, she said — " They were very cold last night, and I was quite 
shivering." Pulse 78 — soft and regular. The whole region of 
the spine was exquisitely tender. 

The treatment in this case was exclusively by means of the 
Spinal Ice-bag and infusion of calumba, and was continued until 
Dec. 14, 1871, in fact, just six months. A striking improvement 
was effected even within the first seven days of treatment ; she 
said, July 20th, " I've not brought so much pain with me, my 
head's better, lighter, and my feet are much warmer." She in- 
formed me at the same date that already she felt the pain in the 
right arm " very rarely," and only '' very slightly ; " that she bore 
the walk to my consulting-room better than she had done the 
previous week, and that the cough and expectoration had markedly 
lessened ; she added, "I find the ice very agreeable ; I look for it, 
and would liJce to have it on longer each time." And again, July 
27th, she said, "I go to sleep with the ice on, it's astonishing how 
pleasant it is." At this date she reported her nights and appetite 
to be much improved. 

August 3rd. — She reported her head to be so much better that 
it was " no longer like the same head ; " that both her sleep and 
her appetite continued to improve ; that her cough had almost 
subsided ; that the leucorrhcea and bearing down of the womb 
had lessened, and that her feet had become continuously warm. 

November 15th. — Every vestige of her neuralgia and of 
her headaches had completely disappeared ; she felt neither the 
heaviness of the arms nor the numbness frequently complained of; 
she had no cough, no expectoration, scarcely any leucorrhcea, and 
no prolapsus uteri or bearing down feelings whatever ; she was 
no longer obliged to urinate with undue frequency, and had quite 
ceased to rise early in the mornings in order to do so. The tongue 
was quite clean, and her appetite thoroughly good ; she was 
sleeping full six hours each night ; she had no smarting of the 
eyes ; she could read test-type 2 fairly well without hesitation, 
and 2^ with perfect ease. 

Dec. 14th. — Every symptom of which the patient had com- 
plained in July continued absent, and the treatment was left off. 

Three months after all treatment had been discontinued I saw 
this patient again — viz., on March 12, 1872 ; she had had no re- 
lapse in respect to any of her symptoms ; she was in excellent 
condition, and stated that she had not passed a winter for )^ears 
so well as she had passed that of 1871-2. 



CASES IIjLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 151 



Case 81. — Neuralgia of the Testicle; Headache; Eye-ache; 
Peculiar Influence of the Nervous System on the Bowels ; 
Coldness of the Feet. 

Mr. , aged forty-four, married, consulted me, Aug. 1871, 

when he complained of pain in the left testicle occurring on an ave- 
rage about three times a week, and chiefly in the evening. The pain 
was increased by walking and " anything of an exhausting na- 
ture." He was also greatly troubled by a peculiarly distressing 
coldness of the glans penis : referring to the presence of this symp- 
tom during the preceding winter he said, " the constant chilli- 
ness of the penis was horrible." He believed his sexual power 
had declined ; he had no desire for intercourse with his wife, 
and seemed, he said, "to be dried up." Neverthelpss, he not 
unfrequently found the penis erect when he awoke in the morn- 
ing. During the preceding six months he had been troubled with 
headache " once or twice a week." The eyes were prone to ache, 
and the left one was troubled with muscse volitantes. During the 
preceding twelve months he had felt a little weakness of the right 
hand ; being a musician he found that it trembled when he went 
before an audience and, as leader, used the baton. He was con- 
scious of having become especially "nervous" during the pre- 
ceding eighteen or twenty-four months, and was so troubled in 
this respect that whenever he was going to give a concert or to 
perform in public he felt a sort of apprehension affecting his 
bowels and causing him to have a markedly loose stool about five 
minutes before the performance began. Otherwise his bowels 
were prone to be rather constipated. He had been " getting more 
bilious" and felt " qualmy fits at times." He had been subject' 
to coldness of the feet all his life, biit latterly this symptom had 
become more pronounced. He perspired very freely. Pulse 80 — 
regular. His habits were especially temperate in all things except 
work ; in that he indulged immoderately. The treatment of him 
included the use of the Spinal Ice-bag, and of the following 
medicines in succession : Ferri et quinge citras cum ammonii 
bromidio ; acidum phosjphoricum dilutum cum strychnia ; Oleum 
morrhuse. 

Exactly a month after I first prescribed for him he reported to 
me that the pain in the testicle had quite left him, that the penis 
had become " perhaps a little warmer ; " that he rarely had head- 
ache ; that he thought his eyes somewhat better, and that he felt 
much less nervous — no longer worried about matters as formerly. 
He added, " I'm not so soon knocked up, and don't feel that 
tremendous sinking which I formerly did." 



152 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED: A SERIES OF 

November 19th, 1871. — I received a letter from him in which 
he reported progress ; the pain in the testicle had not returned ; 
the sense of coldness of the glans penis, though still experienced, 
was decidedly lessened ; he felt much less nervous ; he w^as, " to 
a great extent, rid of that fear of an audience," and had quite 
ceased to be " troubled with diarrhoea just before a concert." I 
did not hear from this patient again. 



Case 81a.. — Nephralgia. 

Frangoise B., aged thirty-five, was suffering from very acute 
nephralgia when I was requested to see her, September 29th, 
1871. She had severe pain in the loins, which spread over the 
left side of the abdomen, invaded the groin, and was esjoecially 
acute along the inner side of the left thigh. The pain was ex- 
cruciatingly intense, of a shooting character, and more or less 
paroxysmal. The patient was very excited and restless, had 
considerable fever, high pulse, acute headache, furred tongue, and 
was much troubled with nausea and vomiting. 

This patient was treated exclusively by the Neuro-dynamic 
method — one Spinal Ice-bag being applied along the lower half 
of the spine, and another across the lumbar region, so that the 
two bags formed an inverted cross. The vomiting and nausea 
were thoroughly subdued, and the pain was greatly abated, before 
the close of the first day of treatment. On the second day the 
patient was almost wholly free from nephralgia, she was wholly 
free from headache, was Cjuite calm, and her general condition 
was strikingly imj)roved. On the third day she was altogether 
free from pain, and so well generally that she resumed her usual 
occupation. 

Case 82. — Facial Neuralgia. 

Mary Ann S., aged twenty-two, consulted me, Oct. 3, 1871, 
suffering from infra-orbital neuralgia, the chief focus of which was 
over the left malar bone. The pain came on in violent paroxysms 
most generally about five p.m., and lasted very severely between 
four and five hours. The disease began in the winter of 1870-71, 
and gradually increased in severity : during the three months 
before she consulted me the patient had had the pain " every 
day quite three weeks out of four." When describing her suf- 
ferings she said, " The pain begins all of a sudden ; you know 
how toothache begins, this begins just like it." Before the pain 
was felt the area of pain became red : she said, " I can feel it 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PHINCIPLES AND PRACTICE, 153 

flush up before I feel the pain ; " and during the paroxysms the 
part could not only be felt but could be seen to throb. For some 
time immediately before I was consulted the patient had also ex- 
perienced a dull aching between the jjaroxysms ; she said, " I 
feel it even while I sleep." There Avas a decayed molar tooth in 
the upper jaw of tlie affected side, but the patient refused to have 
it extracted. Pulse very feeble — 126; appetite bad; bowels open 
daily ; catamenia normal. 

I prescribed the application of the 8-inch Spinal Water-bag 
containing water at US'' F. whenever the paroxysms threatened 
to recur, and at other times when any pain was felt. 

The patient's brother called upon me some time afterwards, 
and informed me that the use of the heat as directed stopped the 
pain, and that she soon completely recovered. 



Case SS. — Neuralgia of the Four Limbs; Distressing Sensa- 
tion in the Throat ; Headache ; Pain along the Spine ; 
' Cramps ; Faintness ; Profuse Leucorrhoia ; Excessive 
Coldness of the Feet. 

October 4tli, 1871. — Mrs. A., aged thirty-four, eight months 
pregnant, applied to me at the Farringdon Dispensary when suf- 
fering from continuous aching of both forearms, with extension of 
the pain through the hands, and affecting the fingers, and of the 
thighs and knees : the pain was worst in the right side. She was 
also much troubled with pain along the spine, usually beginning 
between the shoulders and reaching down to the lumbar region : 
sbe had '' a bad headache most days," had cramps in the calves 
of her legs, and often felt faint. She especially complained, too; 
of a peculiar and distressing sensation in the throat, just as if she 
had swallowed a "fish-bone": she was also troubled with nausea 
each day, and often in the night. She was generally very chilly, 
and felt as if cold water were trickling down her back : she had 
profuse leucorrhoea, and her feet were habitually very cold. 
Pulse 108. 

The pain began in the lower extremities about the previous 
Christmas, and soon invaded the upper. They were much in- 
creased, and, when absent brought on immediately, by any fright, 
painful excitement, or hurry. The cramps in her calves had 
troubled her during each of her pregnancies. About three months 
before she applied to me she began to experience a distressing 
sensation in the throat, which she thought due to a fish-bone. 
She remembered taking some fish about that time ; she then 
swallowed some bread, which she thought lodged there too ; and 

M 



1 54 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 

soon afterwards she took a piece of gristly meat. Ever since then 
the sensation had been increased, and was troubling her extremely 
and constantly. She suffered much from sickness and vomiting 
during the early months of her pregnancy — the nausea she still 
complained of being a remnant of that malady. She menstruated 
irregularly and with undue frequency (almost every fortnight) 
until she "quickened," and had ''always suffered very much " 
from leucorrhoea. 

This patient was treated exclusively by the Neuro-dynamie 
method : the decisive and rapid improvement which was effected 
in her is indicated by the following reports. 

Oct. 10th. — The aching of the thighs and knees had quite 
ceased, and that of the upper extremities had nearly ceased. She 
said, — " I've never had the cramps since I'ved used the ice." The 
upper part of the spine was, she reported, much better, and, she 
added, — " My throat is ever so much better : it used to keep me 
awake for hours in the night — now it don't wake me at all." Her 
headaches and leucorrhoea were much lessened, and her sickness 
and faintness were "all but gone." Her appetite was "much 
better," and her feet were warm. She remarked that she found 
the ice very comfortable. 

Oct. 2-4th. — She found herself still better in all respects, and 
her throat so comfortable that she was concerned to know whether 
she would be allowed to use the Spinal Ice-bag in the Lying-in 
Hospital, where she expected to be confined. She said she left 
off the ice during thirty-six hours, and became so bad again that 
she dreaded to be without it. 

Nov. 7th. — All her troubles, except that of the distressing sen- 
sation in her throat, had ceased to recur. This was apt to recur 
after meals, but was relieved hj means of the Spinal Ice-bag 
every time it was applied. 

Jan. 2, 1872. — The patient had been " confined " in the Endel 
Street Hospital, and during the first sixteen days after confine- 
ment she continued quite free from all the disorders about which 
she first consulted me ; but at the end of that time the chimney 
of the ward where she lay took fire. Her bed was quite near the 
fire-place, and she was very much frightened : all her pains in her 
back and limbs came back ; she suftered much from her throat 
again ; she complained of tingling in all her limbs, and over the 
chest and back, and said that where she had the tingling the skin 
became " goose}^ " and cold, and then that burning-heats and 
perspirations came on. The tinglings came on in fits during both 
day and night— worse at night. Thej^ recurred six or eight times 
during each night. She sweated while she tingled, the sweat 
falling off in drops. She said, — " I seem cold, and yet I seem 
hot." After the tingling subsided she grew very cold — the back 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 155 

more so than any other part. The affection of the throat differed 
on this occasion from what it was in the first instance : instead of 
feeling, as before, that something was ''laid across it," as she 
said, she experienced severe shooting and constant pains in it. 
They kept her awake many hours each night. Her bowels were 
obstinately constipated. She was again treated in the manner 
Avhich had previously proved so effective, and all her symptoms 
soon yielded again completely. In the middle of March follow- 
ing she continued quite free from them, and the treatment was 
discontinued. 



Case 84. — Headache; Ocular Netwalgia ; Nausea; Leucor- 
rlioia of Five Years Duration; Deficient Catamienia ; 
Frequent Flushings ; Extreme Coldness of the Feet. 

October 18th, 1871, — Mrs. K. B., aged thirty, apphed to me in 
consequence of suffering from very severe pain in her head and in 
her right eye. The pain was most acute at the back of the head ; 
the pain in the eye generally came on simultaneously with the 
headache — in the morning — and was intensely severe. She 
suffered habitually from nausea, and from leucorrhoea, which 
began soon after her marriage, five years previously, and had 
continued ever since. Her catamenia was so slight that she 
might fairly be said to be suffering from amenorrhoea : from the 
time she first began to menstruate, when she was fourteen years 
old, she had never been obliged to wear a napkin. She was 
treated in the first instance by means of the Spinal Ice-bag 
alone. 

October 31st. — The patient reported that her feet had become 
much warmer, and that the Spinal Ice-bag made her warm all 
over each time she put it on : she bad felt neither sickness nor 
nausea ; her flushings, which had stopped during the first week of 
treatment, recurred slightly at this date. I requested her to 
continue the use of the ice as before, and to take the following 
medicine : — Potassii bromidi, gr. v. ; Potassii iodidi, gr.ij^. ; 
Aquse camphorse, §ss., ter die. 

November 7th. — The headaches had become less frequent ; 
came on later in the day than formerly, and lasted a shorter time. 
Sickness had not returned ; appetite improved ; leucorrhoea 
lessened. She said, — " My feet have been warmer ever since I 
have had the ice." I advised it still to be continued, and pre- 
scribed — Ferri et quinse cit., gr. iv., bis die. 

Nov. 21st. — Had had headache only once ; the flushings had 
quite ceased ; nausea had not recurred. 

M 2 



156 i,^EURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OP 

Nov. 5tli. — The catamenia recurred ten daj^s previousl}', and 
were healthier and more copious than hitherto. The patient 
seemed to be much impressed with the action of the Spinal 
Ice-bag in increasing her warmth. At this date she said, — 
" About five minutes after I put the ice on I am warm all over." 
I now directed the Spinal Ice-bag to be applied along the lower 
two-thirds of the spine, forty-five minutes, twice a day, and 
prescribed — Potassii bromidii, ferri et quinte citratis, aa gr. v., ter 
die. 

January 2nd, 1872. — She said " my head has been beautiful ; 
I have never had headache for a Avhole fortnight." I ordered the 
ice to be continued as before, and prescribed — Pilule aloes et 
ferri, gr.v.,omne nocte; Ammonii chloridi, gr. viij., Infusi calumbse, 
§ss., ter die. 

April 4th. — The patient continued the use of the Spinal Ice-bag 
until this date, and took the medicines which I prescribed from 
time to time during the interval, but of which I kept no record. 
At this date she had been quite free from pain, both in the head 
and in the eye, during two months. Sickness had never returned ; 
her feet were habitually warm ; and the menstrual flow had con- 
siderably increased — it lasted three days, and she was obliged to 
wear napkins during the whole time ; moreover, the discharge, 
which previously was not only scanty, but whitish, had become of 
a bright red colour. The leucorrhoea had completely ceased. As 
she was now quite well in all respects the treatment was dis- 
continued. 



Case 85. — Flying Pains in Various Parts of the Body; 
Pcdnful Excitability of the Signal Cord, with Great 
Tenderness along the Spine ; Excessive Flatulence ; Pro- 
fuse Leucorrhoea. 

October 21st, 1871. — Mrs. M. J., complained to me at the 
Farringdon Dispensary of suffering almost continuously from 
pains, now in one part of the body, now in another, and of aching 
of the back. Her abdomen was largely and almost constantly 
swollen, causing her great distress, and especially embarrassing 
her breathing. She was also troubled with very copious leucor- 
rhoea. I treated her by means of the Spinal Ice-bag exclusively. 

Oct. 28th. — She reported herself much better in all respects, 
and especially that her leucorrhoea had already lessened. 

Nov. 14th. — She said the Spinal Ice-bag had taken away her 
pains, that she was now very seldom troubled with wind, whereas 
before using the bag she used, she said, " to swell to such a size." 
The leucorrhoea had very " nearly ceased." She began to men- 



CASES ILLUSTKATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 157 

struate Nov. 9th, the flow being more copious and continuing 
longer than on former occasions. This patient vokmteered the 
following statement : " Before I used the ice my bosoms were 
falling away ; now they've become quite round again. I believe 
that if I had had the ice years ago I should have had children." 
The patient wished to retain the bag which had been lent to her, 
and I never saw her as-ain. 



Case 86. — Severe Crampij Pains in the Abdomen ; Backache ; 
Distressing Tenderness of the lohole S]jine ; Violent and 
Prolonged Diarrhcea, with Coldness over the ivhole Body ; 
Leucorrhma. 

Mrs P., aged thirty, applied to me Nov. 25th, 1871, when her 
chief trouble consisted of severe cramj)y pains in the abdomen, 
associated with diarrhoea. The pains generally came on in the 
night after she had been asleep about two hours, and then diar- 
rhoea supervened ; they often troubled also, however, in the day- 
time, and on the morning she came to consult me they were so 
intensely severe that she had to stand still several minutes in the 
street while on her way. She complained too of severe and 
almost constant backache ; she suffered from leucorrhoea, and 
there was great tenderness of the whole spine. Her feet were 
very cold — "dreadfully cold, like stones," she said ; and she was 
remarkably cold all over. In fact, her aspect was that of a 
patient in the first stage of cholera : her eyes were sunken, and 
her countenance was especially pinched and pallid. 

She had been an epileptic since childhood. She began to 
suffer from violent diarrhoea about three months before she 
came to me, and the first onset of the disorder was preceded 
by severe crampy pains in the abdomen during about a fort- 
night. Throughout the whole three months since the diarrhoea 
came on it had never left her a week, and rarely a day. During 
the first part of that period the bowels were moved " fully ten 
times a day ; " but the frequency of action gradually lessened, 
and when she first consulted me they were moved in the day-time 
only after she had taken food or drink, the effect of which made 
her almost afraid to take anything, '" because it brought it on." 
At night the disorder still continued to manifest itself with re- 
markable regularity : it came on after the patient had been in 
bed about two hours, during which she generally slept — though 
not soundly, and as a rule was preceded and accompanied by the 
pains already mentioned. I prescribed the application of the 
Spinal Ice-bag, from thirty to sixty minutes, twice a day — the 



158 NEURO-DYNAMIG MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 

precise length of time it should be applied to be determined by 
her tolerance of it. 

Dec. 2nd. — The Spinal Ice-bag, she said, startled her at first ; 
but by the time she had had it on twenty minutes it seemed to 
warm her all over. Her feet had become warmer than they had 
been for several months. Since November 26th the symptoms had 
gradually abated, and, on the night of the 29th, she experienced 
quite a change : she i:)assed the night without diarrhcea, and the 
pain had almost subsided. Last night she had to get up but 
once, and the pain was "very trifliug." She slept much better. 
" In fact, these nights," she said, " I've gone to sleep with the ice 
on." Her appetite had greatly improved, and her increased 
warmth continued. 

Dec. 23rd. — Since last report she had had much trouble, caused 
by the illness and death of her child, and had beeu able to use 
ice at night only. She reported that she continued warm all over ; 
that she had no pain at all since the 19th ; that the diarrhcea was 
almost wholly stopped ; and that neither food nor drink was any 
longer able to bring on the disorder. She had had scarcely any 
pain in the hollow of the bach, and during the previous fortnight 
she had had no leucorrhoea at all. 

Dec. 29th. — She reported herself completely recovered from the 
maladies which had troubled her : all pain, diarrhoea, and leucor- 
rhoea had completely ceased ; she continued warm ; and her 
general health and strength had so increased that she said, — 
" I don't feel like the same woman I used to be. " Treatment 
discontinued. 



Case 87. — Enteralgia ; Loss of Appetite ; Indigestion ; Nau- 
sea ; Watery Eructations ; Vomiting ; Ohstiiiate Consti- 
pation ; General Chilliness, 

Mr. Gr. D., aged thirty-seven, a plumber, applied to me at the 
Farringdon Dispensary, November 29th, 1871, when he was 
suffering from very severe enteric neuralgia. He described the 
pain as being deep-seated in the bowels, dreadfully intense across 
the centre of the abdomen, and as ascending sometimes along 
each side of the chest. It often lasted, with a few short intervals 
of respite, throughout the whole day. His appetite and digestive 
power were much impaired ; he felt nausea liabitually ; was much 
troubled with watery eructations, and vomited frequently. Some- 
times he ejected extraordinarily large quantities of bile. His 
bowels were, and had long been, obstinately constipated. He 
complained too of an habitual feeling of general chilliness. The 
severe pain began about a year before he came to me, and had 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 159 

gradually increased iu intensity and frequency of recurrence. He 
Had been working as a plumber from the time he was fifteen years 
old, and had had lead colic from twelve to eighteen times. His 
health had been gradually ftiiling during the two or three years 
before I saw him. During that time he had experienced con- 
siderable pecuniary losses which had pressed upon him and made 
him worse. He had been disabled from work during ten weeks 
immediately before he came to the Dispensary. Previous to the 
onset of the enteralgia he had violent cramps in the legs — chiefly 
in the calves. I treated him by means of the Spinal Ice-bag. 
I also prescribed aperient pills to be taken occasionally, and an 
ounce of infusion of calumba, to be taken twice a day. 

Dec. 2nd. — The patient reported himself better : the attacks 
began at a later hour in the morning than before, and were less 
severe each time they recurred. His appetite had already im- 
proved, and he felt himself not only better bodily, but in better 
spirits. 

Dec. 5th. — He passed the night of Dec. 2nd, after using the 
Spinal Ice-bag, without pain : he went to bed at nine p.m., and 
slept till five a.m., when he awoke without pain. Since then it 
had not recurred. 

Dec. 9th. — He had had no return of the pain after it subsided a 
week previously ; his ^jpetite was thoroughly good ; he was no 
longer troubled with indigestion, watery eructations, or vomiting ; 
his bowels had become open daily, so that he had no need of the 
aperient pills ; he felt much warmer, and, in fact, well and com- 
fortable generally. Feeling quite able to resume work, and 
having the offer of the management of a business in the country, 
he accepted it, and I did not see him again. 



Case 88. — Oastralgia, Vomiting, and Hahitual Constipation. 

Mr. E. W., aged fifty-six, consulted me Dec. 5th, 1871, on 
account of severe and long-continued pain in the stomach. The 
pain was not concentrated at any one point, but was diffused 
over the epigastric region, and was not increased by pressure over 
any part of that region. The pain was dull, heavy, gnawing, and 
deep-seated. It usually came on in a slight degree between 
breakfast and dinner (he dined at one p.m.) ; between dinner and 
tea it recurred or increased ; if it had not previously subsided it 
increased greatly, and persisted until he vomited, when he was 
immediately and, for the time, completely relieved. He generally 
vomited about five p.m. He first threw up about a teacupful of 
" perfectly clear water," and then a considerable quantity of 
white chyle-like fluid, of about the consistence of an egg beaten 



160 KEURO-UYNAMIG MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 

up. He did not remember ever to have vomited auytliiug; that 
he could distinguish as food which he had taken. The ejected 
matter always appeared to have undergone the digestive process. 
After he had vomited he was, as a rule, free from pain till the 
following day ; but sometimes it recurred in the night unaccom- 
panied with vomiting. He was also troubled with obstinate con- 
stipation, from which he had suffered many years. In other 
respects his health was good ; he looked ruddy and strong ; and, 
when untroubled by gastralgia, he worked from morning till night, 
discharging the duties of a responsible office in a large London 
business. 

During his boyhood he was peculiarly liable to vomit, and 
during his apprenticeship he was often obliged to go home in 
consequence of suffering from persistent sickness. After arriving 
at manhood he got completely rid of his trouble during upwards 
of twenty years. It recurred in April, 1863, in a very violent 
form, and continiied throughout May and June, during which he 
was incapacitated from attending to business. The attack on 
this occasion began with a "fainting-fit," and was accompanied 
by the loss of " a great deal of blood " from the bowels during 
seven or eight days. The next attack began in March, 1867, and 
lasted two months : his motions on this occasion were black, 
owing to the admixture of blood. Having recovered from this 
attack, he continued free from his malady during about three 
years. He had an attack in 1870, anotlier in June, 1871, and 
another October 6th, 1871, and from that date until I first saw 
him, two months afterwards, he had rarely had a day of relief 
from suffering in the manner he described when he applied to me. 
He found mental excitement or "business worry " conduced to 
bring on the pain. 

My treatment of him was by means of the Spinal Ice-bag, and 
in the first instance I also prescribed as follows : — R Potassii 
bromidii, 5i!^s. ; potassai bicarbonatis, 5J- j tincture calumbse, 
aqucTe distillatse a a §iss. ; capiat, ^ij.> ex aqua, ter die. 

Dec. 17th, 5 p.m. — He reported that he found the Spinal Ice- 
bag very comfortable ; that during the lltli and 12th he was 
quite well ; that during the 13th and 14th he had some pain, 
though not severe, and without vomiting, and that from that time 
he had continued quite well. 

Jan. 1st, 1872. — The patient called upon me and stated that 
until the previous day he liad continued free from both pain and 
sickness, and that his general health had been excellent. During 
the previous fortnight he did not use ice at all. On Dec. 31st he 
partook of roast beef and plum padding — a small piece of the 
latter. Violent sickness afterwards recurred. The vomited matter 
v:as ludike thai ichich he had formerly been in the hahit of throtc- 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PlllNCIfLES AJJl) PRACTICE. 161 

imi up, hut resemhled rather the ordinary ejecta from the domach, 
mixed witli a considerable amount of mucus. He was sick this 
morning in tlie sa.me way. I requested liim to resume the treat- 
ment previously prescribed. 

January 28th. — The patient reported that he had continued 
the use of the ice as directed during the whola of the preceding 
month, that from the time of resuming its use the sickness 
steadily declined, and that by the end of the first week it had 
completely ceased again. During the whole of that week the sick- 
ness was accompanied by no jJaln 'whatever — aji exjmrlence quite new 
to the patient. He had had no pain since ; he ate meat and various 
kinds of ordinary food without experiencing anj^ discomfort, and 
said he never felt better in his life. He was particularly emphatic 
in his praise, not merely of the great efficacy of the Spinal Ice- 
bag, but of the remarkable comfort and agreeable sensations 
which it induced. He said that at first he was terrified by the 
idea of using it ; but that he had cojne to look forward to it with 
pleasure, and generally that he fell into a sound sleep while lying 
upon it on the sofa. 

I have seen this patient many times since the last date men- 
tioned, and up to the time I write (September ITtli, 1872) he has 
continued perfectly well. 



Case 89. — Hypogadric Neuralgia of Several Years' Duration; 
Violent Headache ; Coldness of the Feet. 

Elisabeth F., aged fifteen, who was suffering from severe and 
frequently recurring pain in the hypogastric region, and very often 
from violent headache, was brought to me by her mother Dec. 
6th, 1871. The hypogastric pain was experienced almost every 
day, and was so severe that sometimes when walking home from 
her Avork, instead of being a quarter of an hour, she was an hour 
on the way — often holding on to the railings lest she should fall. 
The pain was most prone to come on after tea. Eating or drink- 
ing too freely Avould induce it, so also woiild mental emotion : 
" if," her mother said, " she's too lively within herself it 'ill come 
on." Ordinarily, an attack lasted from twenty to thirty minutes. 
Almost from her birth she had been troubled with this pain. 
" When she was young," said her mother, " I was forced to strip 
her, and lay her before the fire, and apply hot flannels." When 
eleven years old she was an in-patient of the Great Ormond 
Street Hospital on account 'of the pain in question. No organic 
cause of the pain was discoverable, and I concluded that it Avas 
Avhat is ordinarily called " neuralgic," The patient's bowels were 



162 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED: A SERIES OF 

regular ; she had not begun to menstruate ; her feet were 
habitually cold. I treated her by means of the Spinal Ice-bag, 
applied iu the dorso-lumbar region. The result is indicated in 
the successive reports which follow. 

Dec. 12th. — She had only felt the hypogastric pain twice since 
the Spinal Ice-bag was first applied, and then it was muck less 
severe than before. Her headache was also somewhat lessened. 

Dec. 19th. — Had had no hypogastric pain and no headache 
whatever since the date of the previous report. 

Jan. 2, 1872. — Having to go to business at an early hour in the 
morning, and finding herself free from pain, she had, during the 
previous fortnight, applied the Spinal Ice-bag only half the time 
I had prescribed : the hypogastric pain had recurred, however, 
only once, and then much more slightly than formerly ; but she 
had had headache several times. She was requested to use the 
Ice-bag as at first prescribed. 

Jan. 30th. — Had slight hypogastric pain during about thirty 
minutes Jan. 27tli : this was the only time she had felt it since 
the date of the previous report. She said, — " My head is ever so 
much better." Her feet had become cj^uite warm. 

Feb. 20th. — Had had no return of pain of any kind. 

March 27th. — Had continued absolutely free from headache^ 
and had had the " old pain " only once since the previous date. 
The bowels continued regular, appetite good, feet warm, and she 
slept well. I requested the use of the Spinal Ice-bag to be con- 
tinued, and prescribed — Pilule aloes et lerri, gT. v., omni nocte. 

April 23rd.. — Had only had the pain once, and then very 
slightly — " it soon," she said, " went away." Replying to my 
inquiry respecting her head, she said, — " Oh, I never hardly have 
a headache now." She looked extremely well. 

May 28th. — Had had neither pain iu the head nor pain iu the 
hypogastrum since previous visit. She said she felt very much 
stronger than formerly, and she looked thoroughly robust and 
well. 

I saw the patient again in July, when she still continued free 
from pain.. 1 have not seen her since. An interesting feature in 
her case w^as her striking increase of beauty during her treatment. 
A like result is, however, often observable in cases submitted to 
the Neuro-dynamic treatment : it is especially observable in those 
cases in which either pain or slight tonic spasm of the facial 
muscles, such as obtains in manj^ epileptoid cases, is a charac- 
teristic symptom. 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PKINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 168 



Case 90. — Violent Granipy Pains inthc Abdomen ; Diarrhcea ; 
Headache; Spine-ache; FaAntness ; General Coldness. 

Mrs. J., aged fortj^-uine, complained at the Farringdou Dis- 
pensary December 13th, 1871, of crampy pains in the abdomen, 
which were worst when she was in bed. They usually came on 
about midnight, after she had been in bed two hours, and which 
by their violence bent her double. They were soon followed each 
night by diarrhoea, which troubled her ordinarily about six times 
a night, sometimes even eight times. After she rose in the 
morning the bowels were usually moved about three times. 
Daring the day the disorder generally ceased, but recurred 
in the evening, in the course of which her bowels were 
moved about twice as a rule. The pain was . slighter during 
the day, but did not wholly cease : she suffered also from 
headache and from general coldness, — the cheeks and ex- 
tremities were markedly cold, the arms being clammy. The 
lower part of her spine, since she suffered from diarrhoea, 
"ached so," she said ; she felt faint, but had never actually fainted. 
Her diarrhoea came on suddenh^ as she was carrying a heav^^ tray 
to the top floor of a lofty house about a month ago, and had 
continued ever since. She had been treated at the Gray's Inn 
Hospital during a fortnight, and subsequent!)- at the Farringdon 
Dispensary, where I prescribed for her the ordinary diarrhoea 
mixture supplied by the Dispensarj', and afterwards sulphuric 
acid in full doses, each of which contained half a grain of quinine. 
Her pulse was remarkably feeble — 84 ; menstruation ceased five 
years previously. There was extreme tenderness on pressure along 
the spine between the scapulie, and from about the eighth dorsal 
vertebra down to the sacrum. Tongue clean ; appetite " middling." 
She was directed to apply ice along the whole spine 120 minutes 
three times a day. 

December 19th. — The pains were quite abolished ; the motions 
had become much more solid ; she rose twice the previous night, 
once the niglit before, and the night before that not at all ; no 
motions at all in the day-time since using the ice, which, she said, 
" I fancy draws me to sleep." Whereas her sleep was formerly con- 
siderably broken, she now slept quite soundlj^, and didn't wake till 
nearly morning ; her appetite was better ; she stooped with pain 
no longer ; her forehead, cheeks, and extremities had become quite 
warm ; all clamminess was gone ; her feet, formerly " like stones," 
felt now " nice ; " all feeling of faintness was also gone ; she had no 
aching whatever of the spine ; pulse 90. 

January ith. — She used the ice twice only after last \usit. From 
that time the bowels had acted quite regularly — once a day only, 



164 NEURO-BYNAMtC MEDICINE EXEMPLiriEi) : A SERIES OF 

and not at all during the night ; she had remained quite free 
from pain ; had continued warm, feet included ; no faintness ; 
had been to work, which she had not been before, having " no 
strength in her ; " her headache had quite ceased ; the tenderness 
of her spine was strikingly lessened ; pulse 88 ; skin warm. She 
felt altogether well, and tlie treatment was finally discontinued. 



Case 91. — Facial Neuralgia ; Neuralgia of the Four Limhs ; 
Infra-viariimary Pain ; Spine-ache ; Impairment of Sight; 
Tender iicss of the Scalp ; Feeble Appetite ; Constipated 
Bowels ; Leucorrhoia ; Coldness of the Feet ; Excessive 
Tenderness along the Sjnne. 

Louisa N., aged twenty-three, married, came to the Farringdon 
Dispensarj^ January 24th, 1872, when suffering from severe and 
prolonged neuralgia in various parts of the body, her face and 
head being especially painful. Tlie facial neuralgia was chiefly 
on the rig-Jit side, though latterly also affecting the left, and ex- 
tended over the face and temple. The pain, which was most 
continuous and most acute just outside the outer angle of the 
right eye, was of a shooting, darting, and throbbing character. On 
one occasion its severity had caused her to lose her consciousness. 
She was sometimes, though rarelj'', free from severe pain during a 
whole day ; was often free during a few hours, but had always 
some pain, though it might be so subdued that she almost forgot 
it. She had severe attacks on an average four days out of six, 
and when the paroxysm came on it lasted until she fell asleep at 
night. During its continuance the ej^es were full of tears — the 
right especially so. After the subsidence of an attack the scalp 
Avas so fearfully tender, that she could not bear it to be touched ; 
it was, however, always tender more or less. After each attack 
the right eye ached severely. 

Of the neuralgia of the limbs, that of the right arm and elbow 
was especially severe — the left arm was only occasionally affected. 
The pain in the lower extremities recurred every day, and attacked 
chiefly the front of the thighs and also the calves. Often when 
she walked she felt as if she would Ml. Her vision had become 
much impaired, that of the right eye most so ; she could not read 
pica type with either eye ; she slept fairty well when free from 
pain, but heavil}^ ; appetite feeble ; bowels ver}^ constipated — 
three or four days usually passing without action ; she had had 
leucorrhcea several years, also extreme coldness of the feet. 

The trigeminal neuralgia had afflicted her between seven and 
eight years, the spinal pain about seven or eight months, and the 
pain in the left side about four months. She had been a patient 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 1G5 

at the Surrey Dispensary, at Gay's and at St. Bartholomew's 
Hospitals, and had been treated by a general practitioner, who 
told her she had " a worm on the brain " ! 

My treatment in this case by the Neuro-dynamic method 
involved the use of both heat and cold, the application of which 
was modified in accordance with the changes occurring in 
the symptoms of the patient. At the end of a week the 
patient reported a decidedly increased warmth of the feet, 
a lessening of the leucorrhoea, and an improved action of the 
bowels. 

February 7th. — The patient reported that the pain beneath her 
breast had left her, and that during the previous four days she 
had had no pains in her limbs. The bowels having become less 
active again, I prescribed aperient pills. 

February 21st. — The patient stated that the pain had shifted 
from the angle of the eye to the side and top of the head ; that 
the paroxysms had become very much less severe — only one severe 
one having occurred within the previous fortnight. Lachryma- 
tion of both eyes had quite ceased ; the pain between tlie 
shoulders had much lessened, and that below the left breast had 
not returned. The bowels had again become more regular ; the 
vision had perceptibly improved. She added, — " I have been 
able to do a little work this week." On this occasion I prescribed 
Ferri et quinse citratis, gr. iij., ter die, the pills being used, if 
needful, as before. 

March 6th. — The patient informed me that the pain at the 
angle of the eye had only recurred at times, and then very 
slightly ; that the pain at the side and top of the head had been 
absent for days together ; that when it did recur, it also was 
slight ; that she had had no severe attack since last visit ; that 
she had been quite without pain in the arms and legs for a fiill 
week ; and that neither the pain between the shoulders nor that 
below the left breast had returned. The bowels had become quite 
regular, the feet quite warm again, she had scarcely any leucor- 
rhoea, and her vision had so much improved that she could read 
test-type No. 3 quite distinctly — even with the right eye. 

March 20th.— She said,—'' Until Monday," the 18th, " I've 
kept wonderfully well — more so than I've been for years." The 
wind then changed to the North, and after that "the pains came 
very sharp, but not so continual," and her head felt heavy. Her 
bowels continued regular, without the aid of aperients, and her 
feet continued warm. The tonic Avas omitted, the Neuro-dynamic 
treatment being continued. 

April 14th. — During the eighteen days preceding this date she 
was free from all pain whatever. It was then quite eight years 
since she had had a like experience. Her bowels continued 



166 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 

regular, and the leucorrhoea had become extremely slight. I pre- 
scribed, — Ammonii bromidii, gr. v., ter die, and the sijinal appli- 
cation as before. 

May 22nd. — Since the previous date she had had some pains 
occasionally, but -when present they were less severe, and of shorter 
duration than formerlj^, and during the last ten days she had 
again been free from pain altogether. Her leucorrhoea had ceased ; 
her bowels continued regular ; and her feet, she said, were " al- 
ways warm." 

At this date her husband entered into a business engagement 
at Manchester, and, as she left London with him, I never saw her 
again. 



Case 92.^ — Neijhralgia ; Acute N'e23hritis ; Dropsy ; Nausea 
and Vomiting ; ConstiiJation of tlie Boive.ls; Headache 
and Melancholy. 

Julia K., aged thirty, married, consulted me February 21st, 
1872, when she complained of having suffered during the pre- 
vious three weeks from headache, great pain across the loins, 
accompanied by a feeling of great heat, and from nausea and 
vomiting. The scalp, face, hypogastric region, and the legs and 
feet were swollen — the latter being greatly so, and also cedematous. 
The bowels were constipated — moved only once in two or three 
days. The urine was loaded with albumen. She slept badly, 
and was depressed and melancholy. The patient had, on several 
occasions during some weeks, walked in her sleep about four 
months previously. She had scarlet fever when twelve years old. 
I prescribed the application, at least three times a day, of two 
Lumbar Ice-bags, — one of them to be placed across the loins, and 
the other along the spine, immediately above it — and the follow- 
ing medicine : — R Pulveris jalapse compositi, 9j., eras mane ; 
R MisturfB ammonise acetatis, §j., Cjuartis horis. 

February 26th. — Used ice three successive days as ordered — 
three times the first day, and twice on the second and third days. 
She felt that the applications would have been more agreeable if 
the cold had been more intense. From the time the ice was first 
applied the pain across the loins gradually lessened, and yester- 
day had wholly ceased ; the legs and feet were very much less 
swollen and cedematous ; she had become quite free from head- 
ache and from sickness ; her bowels had become open daily ; she 
slept very much better, and felt in much better spirits; the 
amount of albumen in the urine was lessened in a striking degree. 
I advised her to continue the use of the ice as before, to take a 
Turkish bath every other day, and to take no medicine. 



CASES ILLU,STRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE, 167 

March 4th. — She reported that she had had no return of the 
pain in the loins, except when she exerted herself, and then but 
slightly ; that she had had no headache at all, and that she felt 
her brain light and clear. The dropsy had completely disap- 
peared both from the abdomen and extremities. She thought, 
however, that she was becoming both thinner and weaker, ancl 
she complained of a " feeling of opi3ression" between her shoulders. 
The amount of albumen in the urine had now become extremely 
slight. I advised her to continue the ice and the Turkish baths 
as before, and to take Olei morrhu£e, 5ij-j his die ; also Ferri et 
quinfe citratis, gr. v., bis die. 

March 11th. — Had had only one Turkish bath since last visit. 
The amount of albumen in the urine was again lessened. I re- 
quested the same treatment to be continued unremittingly. 

March 18th. — Had had no pain whatever since last visit, and 
was in excellent spirits ; felt decidedly stronger ; her bowels had 
become very regular ; there was no perceptible swelling anywhere, 
and the urine did not contain a trace of albumen. She reported, 
however, that she did not sleep very well at night. I requested 
the treatment to be continued as before. 

April 2nd. — The paiii in the loins had wholly ceased ; there 
was no trace of albumen in the urine ; and her appetite was very 
much improved. She complained, however, of pain between the 
scapulse, which she thought had been caused by fright the pre- 
vious week, when ]ier son fell and cut his head. I requested the 
medicines last prescribed to be continued, and the application of 
the Spinal Ice-bag along the whole spine during half an hour 
twice a day. 

April 15th. — The patient reported herself quite free from pain, 
and quite well in every respect. The urine was again found quite 
free from albumen. Treatment discontinued. 

I have seen this patient several times since, and she remained 
quite well. 



Case 93. — Gastralgia ; Vomiting ; Severe Gougli ; Loss of 
Ai^petite ; Emaciation. 

Phillip F., aged seven, was brought to me at the Farringdon 
Dispensary 22nd February, 1872, by his mother, who said he 
suffered every day from a severe pain in his stomach. The pain 
was especially violent in the morning and evening, and often 
caused him to cry aloud. It lasted, when most severe, from 
60 to 120 minutes. It was generally followed, and seemingly 
terminated, by vomiting, which continued from ten to fifteen 



168 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 

minutes. The ejecta consisted of "a sort of thick phlegm." 
He was also troubled with " a very bad cough indeed," 
which was much the most persistent and distressing during 
the night : it was not accompanied by expectoration ; and 
neither percussion nor auscultation yielded evidence of pulmonary 
disease. His appetite was extremely feeble ; he was notably 
emaciated, and looked old for his age ; his countenance was 
pinched, and j)resented an unmistakable aspect of suffering and 
exhaustion. He began to suffer in the manner described, without 
any assignable cause, about five months previously, and had con- 
tinued to do so until I saw him. He was treated solely by means 
of the Spinal Ice-bag. 

March 5th. — His mother reported that since the first day of 
treatment the pain and vomiting had ceased entirely ; that the 
cough was already much lessened ; and that his appetite had 
improved, 

March 19th. — Neither pain nor sickness had recurred. His 
appetite had greatly improved : he asked for food, his mother 
said, several times a day. 

April 2nd. — Had had no pain whatever, and, his mother said, 
" has continued quite free from sickness, except when his father 
has beaten him (!) : then he has sometimes become sick." His 
cough had quite ceased. He slept well, and his appetite had 
continued good. 

April 30th. — Had remained quite free from pain and sickness, 
but had coughed a little during the preceding week. The use of 
the Spinal Ice-bag was continued, and he was ordered to take 01. 
morrhuDe, 5J- ; ^"^i hxri, 5j-, his die. 

June 14th. — Had passed several weeks without experiencing 
pain, cough, or sickness, and was dismissed from the Dispensary 
quite well. 



Case 94. — Brachial Neuralgia ; Hypermsthesia, accompanyincj 
a Lichenous Eruiytion ; Bronchial Catarrh. 

March 9th, 1872. — I was consulted by J. C, male, aged fifty- 
one, who, after being troubled for some weeks with bronchial 
catarrh, and a lichenous eruption, which extended over the whole 
of the front of the chest, and which was intensely irritable, 
began, in the latter part of February, 1871, to sufier from neu- 
ralgia located in the left shoulder and arm. The pain, which was 
of a continuously gnawing kind, rarely extended below the elbow, 
but sometimes it reached to the fingers. It was much the most 
severe in the night, and when the patient lay on his left side it 



CASES ILLUSTKATING ITS PEINCIPLES AND PEACTICE. 169 

seemed to increase : it was appreciably augmented by distressing- 
emotion. During the last week of February and the first of 
March the pain recurred every night. The general health was 
fairly good ; but the patient had occasional, though slight, attacks 
of gout. I advised him to take a Turkish bath weekly, and 
to apply ice along the whole spine during two hours each 
evening. He took a bath in the evening of the day he consulted 
me : though the bath seemed to benefit him generally, it augmented 
the irritation of the eruption of the chest so intensely that it 
became, he said, almost intolerable. Passing the hand over it 
increased it in a striking degree. In this condition he went to 
bed, and applied the Spinal Ice-bag as directed by lying upon it. 
He declared that almost immediately — -within two or three 
minutes — all irritation was absolutely gone, and that he could 
pass his hand freely over the whole of the front of the chest 
without producing any unpleasant sensation whatever — in fact, 
without producing any sensation different from that caused by 
passing the hand over the surface of any other part of his body. 
The irritation did not recur, and by the 16th of March had dis- 
appeared. 

The bronchial mucus, which for some time previously had 
been excessively copious, and had caused frequent coughing in 
order to expectorate it, rapidly lessened in quantity, and at the 
end of the week of treatment had ceased to be troublesome. 

The neuralgia was not felt at all during the night of the 9th, 
and troubled the patient but very slightly afterwards at any 
time, until the 16th, when he experienced a great vexation, 
which quickly brought on the pain again, to be again subdued, 
however, by a fresh application of ice. 



Case 95. — Gastralgia, with Prolonged Vomitmg ; Headache ; 
Coldness of the Feet. 

R. B., male, aged twenty-six, came to the Farringdon Dispensary 
March 13, 1872, and complained of frequently recurring attacks of 
severe, crampy pains in the abdomen. The pains lasted from four to 
twelve hours — most frequently from six to eight hours. They both 
came on and subsided gradually. The pains were usually accom- 
panied with vomiting, which, with slight intervals of relief, lasted 
from two to four hours. On the occasion of .his last attack the 
vomiting continued three hours. On one occasion he was confined 
to bed four days by the length and severity of an attack. If he 
took no aperient medicine his bowels were opened, on an average, 
about once in three days, and his attacks seemed prone to occur 
after the bowels had been confined about three days, but they 



170 NEURO-DTNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 

also sometimes occurred soon after the bowels had acted. Some- 
times he had only a day's freedom from suffering ; but generally 
several days, and not infrequently a week. He also suffered from 
severe headache once or twice a week, and habitually from extreme 
coldness of the feet. 

He was quite well until October, 1869, when he had an accident 
with a chisel, by which the left thenar eminence was deeply 
stabbed : the wound healed rapidly. About two months after- 
wards, when waking in the mornings, he experienced violent 
^'"bilious " headaches, after which he vomited what he had eaten 
the day before. These attacks, which came on first in February, 
1870, were as a rule weekly, and generally occurred on Sunday. 
Wondering whether drinking a little beer on Saturday night 
-caused them, he left off the beer, but they came just the same. 
Then he became troubled with a "nervousness — a violent beating 
of the heart, and noises in the head ; " the attacks of this kind 
were sudden in their onset, and lasted only a few minutes. On 
account of them he was treated at University College Hospital 
during three months, by Dr. Bastian, with temporary benefit. 
Finally, the agonising enteralgia and vomiting, for the relief of 
which he applied at the Farringdon Dispensary, gradually super- 
vened : the intervening stage of the change being backache, from 
which he suffered severely, and constipation, which gradually 
became established. He had had several attaclcs of hsemoptj^sis, 
which began about the time the hand was wounded, and con- 
tinued until May, 1871. He applied at the Dispensary last 
spring on account of this affection : I treated him by means of 
sulphate of beberia, and the haemoptysis had not recurred since. 
He was, I believe, so alarmed by finding himself spitting blood 
that he was led to mention this symptom only when he first con- 
sulted me. 

When he applied to me concerning the troubles of which lie 
complained March 13th, 1872, I prescribed Olei morrhuge, 5ij-j 
bis die, and the application of the Spinal Ice-bag. Thirteen days 
afterwards he informed me that since the beginning of the treat- 
ment he had not had one attack of enteric pain ; that he had had 
headache less frequently, and that, though the fceces continued 
hard, his bowels had become open daily. He said he was much 
surprised to find that the ice was very agreeable. 

April 13th. — He reported that he had had one attack of 
vomiting, but that he had had no recurrence whatever of the 
pain. 

April 23rd. — He was still without any return of pain, and had 
not vomited again. About a fortnight previously he was unable to 
use the ice more than once a day, and his bowels became consti- 
pated again ; after he resumed the use of the ice as first pre- 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRmCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 171 

sca-ibed the action of his bowels again became normal. His 
appearance was wonderfully improved. 

May 7th. — He continued free from enteralgia, vomiting, and 
headache ; but having a slight cold in the head he had left off 
the Spinal Ice-bag during the previous four or five days, and, he 
said, felt the need of it. I asked him what he meant by saying 
he felt the need of it : he replied, — " Why, sir, I feel that I like 
it — I feel that it braces me up." 

This patient, whom I last saw in December, 1872, had had 
no recurrence of the disorders from which^ before treatment, he 
had so grievously suffered. 

Case 96. — Gastralgia ; Aching and Cramps of the Loiver 
Extremities ; Headaclie ; Life-long Vomiting and Diar- 
Thoea ; Fits of Unconsciousness ; Extreme Coldness of the 
%vhole Surface of the Body. 

James W., aged sixteen, who was brought to the Farringdon 
Dispensary by his mother March 18th, 1872, complained of fre- 
quently recurring attacks of " excruciating, crampy pains " in his 
stomach, accompanied by pain at the back of the head, vomiting, 
and diarrhoea. The attacks of " agony in the stomach," as his 
mother called them, were most prone to come on at one or two 
o'clock a.m., and always lasted several hours — often till one or 
two p.m. At the end of the paroxysm his prostration was ex- 
treme. These fits of pain usually occurred two or three times a 
■week, or every second or third day, but sometimes more frequently : 
during the nine days immediately before I saw the boy he had 
been, hi^ mother said, in continuous pain. The pain . across the 
back and base of his head was less severe than the pain in his 
stomach, but more continuous : it very often lasted for days 
together. He often suffered from it without being sick, but he 
was never sick without having at the same time pain across the 
back of his head, and this pain was always much the most severe 
during his attacks of gastralgia and vomiting. The cramps in 
the lower extremities of which he complained were most severe in 
the toes and in the calves of the legs. He was also troubled with 
severe aching of the knees. Vomiting or nausea accompanied the 
gastralgia during the whole time of each attack : the vomiting 
recurred with the most distressing frequency ; he was unable to 
retain anything in the stomach more than a few minutes, and 
between the paroxysms of vomiting he felt miserably sick. The 
diarrhoea from which he suffered was almost incessant. When the 
food which he took did not provoke vomiting it seemed to act 
almost always as an excitant of the bowels, causing diarrhoea. It 

N 2 



172 NEUEO-DYNAMIC MEDICIIJE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 

was a common experience for the bowels to be moved nine or ten 
times during tbe day, and several times during the night, the 
food seeming to pass in an undigested state. The patient also 
suffered from epilepsy, including not only ordinary epileptic 
giddiness, but also a very pronounced form of 2)6tit mal : his eyes 
presented a fixed aspect ; his features, which were in no way dis- 
torted, remained placid, and he looked as if in reverie during a 
variable length of time — from several minutes to half-an-hour, 
consciousness being wholly absent meanwhile. He did not fall 
during these attacks, but sometimes reeled. They generally re- 
curred every day — often several times a day. His sleep was very 
disturbed and unhealthy, even when he was free from gastric or 
enteric troiibles : he often talked in a rambling manner as if 
delirious, or rolled his eyes about unconsciously. The whole 
surface of the body was remarkably cold, his extremities being 
most especially so, and his hands were purple. Sometimes he had 
severe shivering fits. PuLse excessively feeble — 104. He was 
greatly emaciated, pale, extremely weak, and seemed very melan- 
choly. When free from siclaiess he had a voracious appetite, 
and was extremely thirsty. The whole spine was remarkably 
tender, the third, sixth, seventh, eighth, and ninth dorsal segments 
being most especially so. 

The boy said he had suffered in the manner just described 
ever since he could remember, and his mother, an intelligent 
and seemingly truthfril woman, whom I cross-questioned very 
searchingly, made the surprising statement, which she persistently 
adhered to, that her son had suffered much in the same way ever 
since his hirth ! And both mother and son said that the longest 
period that they could recollect him to have remained free from 
diarrhcea was five days at a time, "and then," his mother added, "it 
was when he was taking diarrhoea mixture." He suffered less con- 
tinuously from sickness than from diarrhcea, but the sickness was 
always accompanied Avith pain, both in the abdomen and at the 
back of the head. His mother thought that he had always 
suffered at the back of his head, and mentioned that he had large 
abscesses over the occiput on several occasions. The boy was 
born in the month of July, and, notwithstanding the warm 
weather, his skin was astonishingly cold and blue. He was 
suckled till he was two years old ; but as an infant he was so 
emaciated by diarrhcea and vomiting that when his sisters carried 
him in the street they used to be stopped by persons who were 
struck by the cliild's emaciation and blueness. He was four 
years old before he could sit upright, and he had entered on liis 
sixth year before he had cut his first tooth or could walk alone. 
During the two years immediately before I saw him his condition 
had become worse in all respects, the gastralgia especially being 



CASES ILLUSTKATIXG ITS PEINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 173 

Toucli intensified. He had been an out-patient at the German 
Hospital and at Bartholomew's Hospital many times, he had also 
been at the Victoria Park Hospital, and had been treated by- 
several private medical practitioners, but always without recei\dng 
any substantial benefit. 

I prescribed in the first instance the application of the Spinal 
Ice-bag along the spine, from the middle of the cervical region 
down to the middle of the lumbar region, during three quarters 
of an hour three times a day. 

On March 26th, his mother reported that his vomiting had 
lessened, and that his head was better. But as he suffered from 
toothache, which began on the 21st, the Spinal Ice-bag was not 
applied after the 22nd. I requested it to be re-applied during aa 
hour three times a da}', and that on each occasion it should be 
brought quite close up to the occiput. 

April 1st. — The vomiting had again lessened, but he was still 
much troubled with nausea. The gastralgia was stiU severe, but 
like the vomiting, recurred less frequently than before. Pain in 
the back of the head had also lessened. The cramps in the toes 
and in the calves of the legs had quite ceased, but his knees still 
ached. The boy said, — " I am less giddy, and can keep more to 
myself :" by the latter phrase he meant that he did not so often 
pass into a state of unconsciousness, or of " deep thought," as his 
mother called it. She said he slept much better, and that she 
found him looking brighter, except when he was " suffering con- 
siderably." The diarrhoea was only slightl}-, if at all, lessened. 
I requested the treatment to be continued as before. 

May 2nd. — The vomiting quite ceased April 3rd ; the nausea, 
which gradually subsided, was no longer felt after about the 
middle of April ; during the second half of that month he had 
no diarrhcea whatever — the bowels being moved only once daily, 
and only so much gastric pain as to be described by the boy him- 
self as "just a trifle, and not often." His mother said his attacks 
of " deep thought " were much shorter and less frequent, and 
that everybody noticed how much better and brighter he looked. 
She added, — "He seems to feel so much stronger : he can do things 
so much better than he used to do." His feet had become con- 
tinuously warm ; and his appetite was excellent. The application 
of the Spinal Ice-bag was ordered to be continued each time 
until the bag should cease to be be cold. 

May 7th. — No one of the sjonptoms previously reported as 
having subsided had recurred ; and now every vestige of gastric 
pain had vanished; he had become "warm all over," the feet 
being especiallj^, as he said, " nice and warm." Ho looked fresh, 
fuU in the face — florid even ; his expression was wonderfully 
brighter and more intelligent, and his general strength had greatly 
increased. 



174 NEITRO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED: A SEEEES OF 

There now remained only two elements of the original malady 
unsubdued : headache and petit ma! ; but these had become so 
comparatively slight that both the mother and father of the boy 
considered him cured, and thought it unnecessary to continue the 
treatment any longer. The pain across the back of the head 
had indeed ceased, and the " little headache '"' which he still had 
was " chiefly in the forehead " — a result, I apprehend, of the great 
and comparatively sudden increase of blood-supply to the pre- 
viously starved cerebrum. He was now troubled with petit mal 
or fits of unconsciousness about once a day only, instead of 
several times as heretofore ; and whereas they formerly lasted 
from several minutes to half-an-hour, they now often lasted only 
a few moments, and at most a minute or two. 

The progress of this remarkable case was watched by my 
surgical colleague at the Farringdon Dispensary — Mr. John 
Waters, who was much impressed by the effects he witnessed. 
It is greatly to be regretted that the parents of the boy found 
it inconvenient to bear the- expense of a daily supply of ice for 
him until his petit mal had been, as I believe it could have been, 
completely cured. 



Case 97. — Tnfra-Tnarnmrinry Neuralgia ; Tain hetice^n the 
Slwulders and aloiuj tlu Left Ann ; Seadaclic ; Lumhar 
and Hypogastric Pain, together ivith Sickness, at tlw 
Menstrual Periods; "Faint Feelings;" Chronic Cough, 
loith Copious Expectoration ; Leucorrhcea ; Extreme Cold- 
ness of the Feet ; General Tenderness along the Spine. 

E. C, aged twenty, a housemaid, came to the Farringdon Dis- 
pensary March 20th, 1872, to obtain relief from pain in her lefb 
side. The pain was seated immediately below the left breast, and 
was very severe and continuous. She said, — " Continually some- 
thing seems as if it went drag — drag — drag." Often the pain 
kept her awake a long time each night : during the two nights 
immediately before I saw her it did so. She was also much 
troubled with pain between her shoulders, and extending down 
her left arm. It was intermittent — coming and going at irregular 
intervals. She suffered from very severe frontal headache three 
or four times a week ; and at every catamenial period she had 
intense pain in the lumbar and hypogastric regions during 
the whole of the first day, when she generally felt sick and often 
vomited. Besides these painful affections, she was troubled with 
a disorder called by herseK '"'nasty faint feelings," which she 
described by saying, — " I feel something hot coming over me, and 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 175 

then I grow very cold." _ TKis feeling seemed to come most fre- 
quently as if caused or induced by the infra-mammary pain, and, 
accordino- to her sensations, was directly connected not only with 
it, bat with the spinal cord : after the dragging pain in the side 
had lasted some time, " then," she said, "I have those nasty faint 
feelings, and then it goes to my back." 

She had a considerable cough, which troubled her both winter 
and summer, and she expectorated " a lot of phlegm " — so much 
that she was " choked nearly in a morning the first thing." Her 
appetite was faudy good, but she did not enjoy her food. Tongue 
clean ; bowels regular. The catamenia recurred every third week, 
and were fairly copious. Slie suffered from leucorrhoea, which 
was considerable, and which was markedly increased before each 
catamenial period. Her feet, she said, were always very cold : 
her mother added, — "They're like icicles now, sir." Pulse 75. 
The whole spine was extremely tender. 

Her chief trouble — the infra-mammary neuralgia — had lasted 
twelve months, and at last disabled her from continuing at her 
work. 

She was treated exclusively by means of the Spinal Ice-bag, 
applied in the first instance along the lower two-thirds of the 
spinal cord. After five days of treatment she reported that her 
headache was lessened, and that the pain between the shoulders 
'and along her left arm had ceased ; but that each time she applied 
the Spinal Ice-bag she felt a flushing in the face and giddioess, 
which came on about ten minutes after the ice was first applied, 
and lasted about twenty minutes. She also felt an "aching 
pain " across the lower and front part of the chest after the 
Spine-bag was removed. I then prescribed the apjplication of one 
cell of the Spinal Ice-bag along the lower dorsal and upper lum- 
bar region, and Pilulse hydrargyri cum ext. colocynth c'^, gr. v., 
p. r. n. 

April 3rd. — The infra-mammary pain had abeady quite ceased; 
headache had occurred only once during the preceding week ; the 
leucorrhcea had lessened ; and the patient slept much better than 
formerly. 

May l.st. — The headache had not recurred; the "faint feel- 
ings " had quite ceased ; her co^gh had almost wholly subsided, 
and she expectorated " scarcely any phlegm at all ; " during her 
last catamenial period she " hadn't a quarter so much pain " as 
she had formerly had, and she felt no sickness and no nausea ; 
she had no longer any leucorrhoea, and her feet had become com- 
fortably warm. Feeling well, she resumed her employment, and 
the treatment of her was discontinued. 



176 NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 



Case 98, — Intense Headache; DcUrium; Pain in the Alj do- 
men ; Incessant Vomiting in consequence of Pregnancy ; 
Extreme Weakness and Emaciation. 

April IGbli, 1872, I was requested to visit Mrs. P., aged twenty, 
who was suffering so severely from cerebral disorder and vomiting 
which her ordinary medical attendant seemed unable to control, 
that she was scarcely expected to live. When she was able to 
speak coherently she complained of intense pain in the head — 
" as if it would split open," and also of severe and incessant pain 
in the hypogastric region. She was vomiting or retching almost 
incessantly — night and day ; she could retain and assimilate 
notliing ; even water was being withheld from her, because if she 
took only a tablespoonful of it her retching immediately became 
more distressingly violent. Her pulse was about 60 per minute, 
wiry, irregular, and intermittent. Her eyes were sunken and dim ; 
her countenance had lost much of its usual expressiveness ; her 
mind rambled incoherently, and again, at brief intervals, she 
seemed to be normally conscious ; and she was so wasted that she 
seemed mere '' skin and bone": in short, she was sinking bodily 
and mentally from sheer starvation. Her head, and, indeed, the 
whole surface of her body, were hot and dry, and the skin on the 
palms of her hands was cracked, more or less, in various directions, 
owing to its extreme dryness. There was no diarrhoea. The patient 
had always enjoyed good health until she married at the end 
of 1871. When I first saw her an interval of six weeks had 
elapsed since she had menstruated ; and three weeks after men- 
struation ceased she began to be sick. The sickness soon became 
incessant ; being unable to sleep or rest at night she refrained 
during several nights from going to bed at all ; and in the course 
of her period of sickness she had several attacks of maniacal un- 
consciousness. The prognosis expressed to her father by her 
medical attendant was of the gravest kind : even if she lived, 
which was scarcely to be expected, she would, he believed, be 
permanently insane, and it would be necessary to confine her in a 
lunatic asylum, as was the case of another of his patients whose 
sufferings began in the same way (!). He applied a blister over 
her stomach (!) and the sore it produced was still open when I first 
visited her. 

Seeing how she was suffering for want of water I gave her 
some : it made her vomit immediately with great violence. As 
quickly as ice could be procured I applied it (between three and 
four p.m.) in a Lumbar Ice-bag across the occiput, from ear to 
ear, in order to soothe the brain ; and then, having filled the 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PrJNCIPLES A^D PRACTICE. 177 

upper two cells of a twenty-inch Spinal Ice-bag, I applied them 
along the spine from the fourth lumbar vertebra as far upwards 
as they would reach, viz., to the fifth or fourth dorsal vertebra : 
in about ten minutes the patient was completely soothed. I then 
removed the bag from across the occiput, but left the other one 
applied along the spine : in ten minutes more she was fast asleep. 
Having absented myself for a time, I returned at 5'30 p.m., and 
found that she had been sleeping soundly during nearly the whole 
time of my absence. She had taken water twice, and had kept 
it the second time. As the ice had melted 1 requested the bag to 
be replenished, and I immediately applied it again. She soon 
fancied some tea, which I had had carefully made and mixed with 
an equal quantity of milk : of this she drank a breakfast cupful, 
and kept it. Her pulse had risen to 69, and had improved in 
quality. I requested the Spinal Ice-bag to be applied con- 
tinuously, a fresh supply of ice being put in it every second hour 
unless the patient should be asleep. 

April 17th, 4 p.m. — The Spinal Ice-bag had been applied as 
directed. The sickness had almost wholly abated : she had been 
sick only once, viz., after taking some water in the night. She 
had slept nearly the whole of the night, and a considerable part 
of the day. An enema which was given brought away a large 
accumulation of fseces. She afterwards took a cup of tea, with 
a large proportion of milk in it, and again kept the Avhole of it. 
She was altogether wonderfully better, and since her sleep the pre- 
vious day had not once lapsed into delirium. I now directed the 
Spinal Ice-bag to be applied four times a day, and each time 
to be kept on until the ice in it should be melted, unless, mean- 
while, it should cause discomfort. 

April 18th. — The ice had been used as directed. She had 
taken tea with milk, barley-water — rather thick, and a small piece 
of sole, and had retained the whole. The pain in her head 
had very much lessened, and she was able to sit up and have her 
hair combed out. Her pulse, which was 68, had become fairly 
steady. 

April 20th. — She was sick once, but only slightly, on the 19th 
■ — not at all afterwards. She ate some sole and took milk freely 
Avithout any inconvenience. She bespoke roast mutton for her 
dinner on the morroAA"-^ — Sunday. Her pulse was 66, soft and steady ; 
and her hands, instead of being dry and cracked, had become 
healthily moist. I directed that the Spinal Ice-bag should be ap- 
plied before breakfast during an hour, after dinner and tea during 
three quarters of an hour, and at any other time if she should 
become sick. 

April 24th. — On the evening of the 20th she had oysters for 
supper, and enjoyed them. On the 21st, Sunday, she felt sick at 



178 NEURO-DYITAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 

breakfast : the Spinal Ice-bag was applied, and tlie sickness was 
rapidly subdued. She dined at the family table, and was so well 
that she played the piano to her father afterwards. On the 22nd 
she continued free from sickness. On the 23rd she went down 
stairs to breakfast, and went out afterwards. At the date of this 
report, the 24th, she had had no sickness since the morning of the 
21st; her bowels had acted each day ; she had been free from 
both headache and hypogastric pain during several days : she 
declared herself " all right," and, indeed, looked not only quite 
well, but several years younger than she appeared to be when I 
first saw her. I advised her to re-apply the Spinal Ice-bag if the 
symptoms should recur, and took my leave. 



Case 99. — Gastralgia; Intense Backaclic ; Prolonged Vomiting 
and Diarrlioea ; Leucorrhoea ; Einlejpsy. 

April 26th, 1872. — I was requested to meet in consultation 
the medical attendant of Mrs. A., aged about thirty, who was 
suffering from a combination of troubles, which the drugs that 
had been prescribed seemed unable to alleviate. She had great 
pain, much intensified during vomiting, at the cardiac orifice of 
the stomach, and extraordinarily severe pain — "something beyond 
bearing," she said, along the dorso-lumbar region. It v/as most 
severe in the mornings and evenings. She suffered from retching, 
vomiting, and diarrhoea almost incessantly, and from leucorrhoea 
also : she was, moreover, a victim to epilepsy. 

On an average she was troubled with retching or vomiting seven 
or eight times a day. " If one merely talked about dinner," her 
husband said to me when I last saw him, "let alone having it, 
she began to retch." Tlie mere smell of it made her do so. The 
ejected matters were not infrequently tinged with blood; and some- 
times she threw up small dark clots of blood. Often on waking 
in the morning she found her mouth blood}^, and the pillow stained 
with blood. 

Her bowels never acted naturally : they were alwaj^'s relaxed, 
and though sometimes she might pass a couple of daj^s fairly free 
from diarrhoea, they were often moved ten or twelve times a day. 
Unlike the vomiting, the diarrhoea was accompanied with but 
little pain. 

The attacks of vomiting, accompanied with gastric pain, and 
the diarrhoea, on account of which my advice was requested, began 
a-fresh at the end of October, 1871. From that date until I saw 
her she had not passed a week free from them. Her husband 
said, — " I don't think she ever had a day free from them." The 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PEINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 179 

tilings her stomach was least prone to reject were tea— sometimes 
with eggs beaten up in it — brandy, bread and butter, and occa- 
sionalty — when she fancied it — some crab or lobster : meat and 
vegetables she could not digest at all. 

Her " fainting-fits " or epileptic attacks were wont to recur, at 
the period when I was first consulted, from three or four times a 
week to three or four times a day. Each attack lasted generally 
about fifteen minutes, but sometimes much longer. During an 
attack she became rigid, sometimes the extensor, and sometimes 
the flexor muscles being most powerfully affected ; her jaws were 
firmly clenched, and in many of her attacks there was violent 
opisthotonos. She generally lost her consciousness entirely ; but 
she thinks that on rare occasions she did not wholly do so. When 
recovering she always complained of " a shivering feeling." 

In her girlhood, and on the very day she began to menstruate 
the first time, two girls dressed themselves up in white sheets, and 
so frightened her that she instantly fell in a fit, the catamenia 
suddenly stopped, and during many months afterwards she had 
several fits every day. Gradually the fits recurred at more distant 
intervals, until about a year before her marriage, which took place 
when she was twenty-one years old, about nine years before I saAV 
her, she had a fit only occasionally — " once in one or two months." 
They subsequently became more frequent aga,in, were especially 
frequent during her last pregnancy, and, as already mentioned, up 
to the time when I was requested to see her. 

During the several years which elapsed between the time of her 
fright and that of her marriage, she menstruated only twice, but 
had been long afflicted with profuse and continuous leucorrhcea. 
In the course of her first pregnancy she suffered from retching, 
vomiting, and diarrhoea during about three months, and had many 
fits. During her second a,nd her third pregnancy she suffered in 
the same way. During her fourth pregnancy she was extremely 
nervous : she started, jumped, looked under the bed each night — 
fearing someone might be beneath it, and sufi"ered from sickness, 
diarrhoea, and fits, even more severely than on former occasions. 
But during the icJiole of her fifth pregnancy — her last before my 
advice was requested — she suffered from sickness and diarrhoea 
continuously, and from fits with terrible frequency. Her sickness 
and diarrhoea ceased only with her delivery ; and then, after an 
interval of relief, her sufferings began again, though she was not 
again pregnant, at the end of October, 1871, as already men- 
tioned. 

Up to the time I was consulted her medical attendant had tried 
everything he could think of in the hope of relieving her, but 
without success. I treated her solely by the Neuro-dynamic 
method, applied the Ice-bags mj'-self in the first instance, gave 



180 NEURO-DTNAMIC MEDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SERIES OF 

very careful instructions to her sister concerning their re-applica- 
tion, and took my leave. This was on the 26th of April. On 
the 27th she continued sick, but less violently than before ; on 
the 28th she vomited once, and then both vomiting and retching 
ceased entirely. Her gastric pain subsided along with her retch- 
ing. The diarrhoea was gradually subdued, and at the end of the 
sixth day of treatment also completely ceased, and did not recur. 
Meanwhile her backache and leucorrhoea had markedly lessened ; 
and after the first application of the Ice-bag she had not a single 
fit ! The treatment which effected these extraordinary results 
extended only over nine days, and was then wholly discontinued. 
I saw this patient again June lOth, after the treatment had 
been discontinued upwards of a month : she continued free from 
gastric pain, sickness, and diarrhcea, although she felt threaten- 
ings of the return of the latter ; she was still troubled with leu- 
corrhoea — but not profusely, and with some backache ; she feared 
she was again pregnant. From the time I first applied the Spinal 
Ice-bag she had not had one fit. Her appetite was excellent, and 
she felt, she said, better than she had done for 3^ears : she added, — 
" I now feel that life is worth living." Having given her further 
directions how to proceed in order to prevent fresh invasions of 
her enemies, I took my leave, and never saw her again. 



Case 100. — Sciatica ; Shootinrj Pains in the Head ; Giddi- 
ness and Ifcntal Confusion ; Deficient Catamcnia ; 
Feriodical Shivering ; Coldness of the Feet. 

May lltli, 1872, I was consulted by Mrs. T., aged thirty-eight, 
whose chief malady was sciatica — on the right side. The pain 
extended along the line of the sciatic nerve into the popliteal 
space, and thence down the back of the leg. The pain over the 
outer side of tb e thigh was especially severe. Her suffering came 
on in paroxysms, which were generally brief in the day-time, but 
intensely severe at night. She usually went to sleep soon after 
going to bed, and then after a short time was woke up with the 
onset of a paroxysm. She was in the habit of getting up and 
walking about the room when the paroxysms came on ; by doing 
so she seemed to bear them better, and sooner obtained relief 
from them, she thought, than when she remained in bed. Often 
she got up for the same purpose several times in one night. She 
had been suffering in the manner described about six weeks when 
I first saw her. In the previous autumn she had suffered in the 
same way about two months, and in 1869 about three months. 
She also complained of giddiness and of " sudden attacks of con- 
fusion : " she said, — " When they come on I feel as if I were 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 181 

going to lose my senses." The giddiness troubled her frequently, 
but very irregularly in respect to time — sometimes several times 
in one day, sometimes not at all ; the " confusion " occurred two 
or three times a day — " sometimes it was just momentary, some- 
times it lasted a little longer." 

The cataraenia recurred regularly, but lasted only about two 
days, and were very scanty. She gave birth to a child seventeen 
years j)reviously, and three months afterwards, while still suckling, 
the menses recurred very profusely ; and when, afterwards, she 
weaned the child, they began very notably to decrease, and ever 
since had continued remarkably deficient. About a week before 
the reappearance of the catamenia, she was on each occasion, she 
said, " taken with cold shivers," which recurred frequently each 
day till the flow came on. Her feet were generally cold — " often 
very cold." Pulse 72 ; bowels regular. 

The treatment in this case was throughout and chiefly by means 
of the Spinal Ice-bag : during the first fortnight she took no 
medicine. 

May 25th. — The paroxysms of sciatica were already lessened, 
those occurring in the day most notably so. 

June 1st. — Her head Avas much better : "nothing like so much 
giddiness." But she still had shooting pains occasionally. Her 
feet were certainly warmer." In addition to the use of the Spinal 
Ice-bag, as before, I prescribed — Potassii bromidii, gr. xv. ; 
tincturfe conii, TTj^xx ; aquae camphorse, §j., omni nocte. 

June 8th. — The parox3'sms had become still less severe at night, 
and in the day-time she had only "just a little pain sometimes." 
Her head was altogether better, and her feet continued warm. I 
requested the Spinal Ice-bag to be continued as before, and to be 
used throughout her menstrual period. 

June 14th. — The pain at night was very much lessened, and in 
the day-time she scarcely had any pain at all. Her giddiness had 
become much less frequent. 

June 29th. — The sciatic pain had become so slight that she did 
not get up at night at all. 

July 13th. — She had been quite free from pain every night dur- 
ing the previous week. She said, — " I just feel the pain a little at 
times in the day-time ; it's only momentary — very trifling." She 
complained, however, of heaviness of the head. The Spinal Ice- 
bag was still continued, and instead of the medicine previously 
taken, the following was prescribed : — Ammonii bromiclii, gr. x. ; 
tincturre calumbse, 5j- J aqu?e, ad §j., bis die. 

July 20th. — She had continued quite free from sciatica both by 
night and day, from pain in the head also, and almost entirely 
free from giddiness and confusion. She said, — " I think I may 
consider myself well." 



182 NEUaO-DYNAMIC jVEBDICINE EXEMPLIFIED : A SEBIES OF 

August 3rd. — She had wholly ceased to feel giddy or confused, 
and said, — " My nights are quite delightful." She was requested 
to omit medicine altogether, and to continue the application of 
the Spinal Ice-bag twice instead of three times a day. 

August 17th. — Her catamenia had recurred without being pre- 
luded b}^ shivering, and were of brighter colour and slightly more 
<;opious than formerly ; her feet continued warm ; she had had 
no return of giddiness, confusion, or pain of any land ; she slept 
well, and felt quite weU in all respects. Treatment was therefore 
discontinued. 

December 10th. — The patient's husband informed me that since 
the date of the last report she had continued well in all respects. 



POSTSCRIPT. 

In confirmation of tlie views respecting the pathology and treatment 
of sciatica exemplified in the case last described, as well as of the doc- 
trine, expressed at p. 230 et seq., of my work on "Neuralgia and Kindred 
Diseases of the Nervous System," concerning the nature of the change in- 
duced in the nervous centres by the action of cold on the general surface 
of the body, I may mention an instructive fact experienced by myself. 
On the 28th November, 1872, while sitting in my consulting-room, which 
being large, is with difficulty kept agreeably warm in cold weather, I 
suddenly experienced, about 4 p.m., severe pain along the lower third of 
the spine. I felt cold generally ; but the whole of the lower extremities 
were especially cold. Anxious to complete some work I was doing, I put a 
rug around my legs and continued at my desk. The pain persisted, and 
early in the evening any movement involving flexion of the spine increased 
the pain, and caused it to be felt more widely across the back. I then 
applied a Lumbar Ice-bag along the lower third of the spine, and before all 
the ice had melted the pain had very nearly ceased so long as I sat still. 
I then left London for the night. On reaching home, the back- ache had 
recurred, but in a subdued form ; the whole of both the lower extremities 
ached severely, and I found that stooping, sitting down, and rising up 
increased the pain considerably both in the back and in the whole of the 
muscles of both hips. Knowing that during several days previously, and 
especially during the afternoon in question, I had allowed my feet and legs 
to become very cold, I concluded that I had "taken cold," and therefore, 
before going to bed, put myself in a warm bath, and remained in it at a 
temperature of 100° during about forty-five minutes. It seemed at the 
time to afford appreciable relief ; but during the night the aching was con- 
siderable, and the next day was severe both in the back and throughout the 
extremities — the pain and stiffness in the hips being especially pronounced. 



CASES ILLUSTRATING ITS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. 183 

In the afternoon of that day I took a Turkish bath, sweated profusely, and 
again felt some relief ; but on the following morning the aching, stiffness, 
and immediate increase of pain by movement were quite as great as before. 
I then began the regular use of ice — applying it to the lower half of the 
spine during several hours each day, the last application being after I went 
to bed at night. At the end of the first day the symptoms were markedly 
abated, and at the end of the fourth day they had completely vanished. 
On the following day I resumed my habit of taking a cold shower-bath each 
morning, and quickly after the use of the first bath the symptoms returned. 
Its use was again suspended, and the Spinal Ice-bag was re-applied twice 
that day. The next morning I rose quite free from pain and stiffness, and 
up to this time (December 21st, 1872) have continued so. 

Now, in this case, although there is reason to believe that the symptoms 
were the effects of the influence of cold on the peripheral expanse of 
sensory nerves over the lower half of the body, the counteracting influence 
of heat, subsequently applied by means of both a prolonged warm bath 
and a Turkish bath to the whole of that expanse, failed to do more than 
effect a temporary amelioration ; whereas cold, applied by means of the 
Spinal Ice-bag, to the central ends of those same nerves rapidly and com- 
pletely cured the disorder. This experience is but one proof more added 
to the many already given that the condition precedent of pain is hypersemia 
of the root of the algic nerve, and that, by removing that condition, the 
pain may be abolished. Moreover, in this case, as just remarked, there is 
reason to believe that the symptoms were induced by cold in the manner 
described : I feel assured that they were, and that no other cause is assign- 
able. But if they were, then it is manifest that cold applied to the peri- 
phery of the body induced excitement and hyperssmia of the sensory cells 
of the spinal cord, — a result strikingly accordant with the views I have 
expressed, in contravention of those of Dr. Anstie, concerning the nature 
of the effects on the nervous centres of cold applied to the periphery of 
the body. 



In Course of Publication 
By JOHN CHAPMAN, M.D., M.RC.P., M.E.C.S., 

PHYSICIAN TO THE FARRINGDON DISPENSARY. 



NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE. 

Part I. 
Greneral Principles : Neuro-Physiology ; Neuro-Pathology ; and 

Neuro-Therapeutics. [Tn preparation. 

Part II. 
A Series of Cases, preceded by an Analytical Exposition of them, 

exemplifying the Principles and Practice of Neuro-Dynamic Medicine. 8vo. 

\_Now ready. 

Part III. 
Sea-Sickness, and how to Prevent it : an Explanation of its 

Nature and successful Treatment, through the Agency of the Nervous System, by means of 
the Spinal Ice-Bag, with an Introduction of the General Principles of Neuro-Therapeutics. 
8to, price 2s. 6d. \Noio ready. 

Part IV. 
The Sickness of Pregnancy and other Forms of Symptomatic 

Vomiting. 8vo. ' [In preparation. 

Part V. 
Diarrhoea and Cholera: their Nature, Origin, and Treatment 

thi-ough the Agency of the Nervous System 8vo, cloth, 7s. 6d. \_Now ready. 

Part V a. 
Cases of Diarrhoea and Cholera: treated successfully through 

the Agency of the Nervous System, chiefly by means of the Spinal Ice-Bag. 8vo, Is. 

[Now ready. 

Part VI. 
Flatulency, Constipation, and Irregularity of the Bowels : their 

Nature, Causes, and Treatment. 8vo. [In preparation. 

Part VII. 
Neuralgia, and Kindred Diseases of the Nervous System : their 

Nature, Causes, and Treatment ; also a Series of Cases, preceded by an Analytical Exposi- 
tion of them, exemplifying the Principles and Practice of Neuro-Dynamic Medicine. 
8vo, cloth, 12s. [Noiv ready. 

Part VIII. 
Epilepsy and other Convulsive Affections : their Nature, Causes, 

and Treatment. 8vo. [In preparation. 

Part IX. 
Apoplexy and Paralysis : Cases exemplifying their Successful 

Treatment by the Neuro-Dynamic Method. 8vo. [In preparation. 

Part X. 
Diabetes : its Pathology and Successful Treatment. 

[In preparation. 

Part XI. 

Functional Diseases of Women : Cases exemplifying their Success- 
ful Treatment through the Agency of the Nervous System, Second Edition, 8vo. 

[ In preparation. 



2 Works by Dr. Chapman, already published. 

NEURALGIA AND KINDRED DISEASES OF 
THE NERVOUS SYSTEM: 

THEIR NATURE, CAUSES, AND TREATMENT. 

ALSO A SERIES OF CASES, PRECEDED BY AN ANALYTICAL EXPOSITION OF THEM, 

EXEMPLTFTING 

THE PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF 
NEURO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE. 

8vo, cloth. 



CHAP. CONTENTS. 

I. Phenomena of Neuralgia. 
II. Pathological Theories of Neuralgia. 

III. The Pathology of Neuralgia and its Complications. 

IV. The Pathology of Visceral Neuralgia. 

V. The Several Kinds of Superficial Neuralgia. 
VT. The Several Kinds of Visceral Neuralgia. 
VII. Painful Excitability of the Spinal Cord. 
VIII. Dr. C. B. Eadcliffe's Theory of the Genesis of Pain. 
IX. The Predisposing Causes of Neuralgia. 
X. The Exciting Causes of Neuralgia. 

XI. Objections Answered — Dr. Anstie's Pathology and Etiology of Neuralgia. 
XII. Diagnosis and Prognosis. 
XIII. The Treatment of Neuralgia. 
XIV. The Soothing and Agreeable Effects of the Spinal Ice-bag. 

XV. Neuro-Dj'namic Medicine Exemplified : An Analytical Exposition of its Effect.i. 
XVI. Neuro- Dynamic Medicine Exemplified : a Series of Cases Illustrating its Principles 
and Practice. 



" The main objects of this work may be stated as follows :— 

(1.) To expound a doctrine explanatory of the nature, genesis, and causes of pain in general. 

(2.) To exemplify the applicability of that doctrine as a means of explanation of the genesis and causes of 
neuralgia in paiticular. 

(3.) To prove that neuralgia of that kind which is regarded as a special disease, and which has been distinctively 
designated ' immaterial,' ' centripetal,' and ' true,' cannot be scientifically differentiated from other kinds of pain, 
and that it and all other kinds of pain are, in respect to the nature of their proximate cause, essentially identical. 

(i.) To give a series of explanations of the nature of those morbid changes in the nervous system constituting 
the groundwork and causes of all those collateral phenomena commonly called ' complications ' of neuralgia — 
explanations thoroughly accordant with each other, and with the doctrine just mentioned concerning the nature 
and causes of pain in general. 

(5.) To sliow that the doctrine in question concerning pain in general, and neuralgia in particular, as well as 
the collateral phenomena of neuralgia, suggests a therapeutical principle, by the guidance of which the most 
successful method of counteracting each and all of those morbid states may be attained. 

(6.) To prove implicitly by the whole body of facts and arguments adduced for the objects already mentioned, 
that in man, and indeed in all animals having a highly differentiated nervous system, the presence of disorder or 
disease, even in any part of the body other than that of the nervous system itself, is as a general rule, liable, how- 
ever, to exceptions perhaps not yet ascertainable, a phenomenon or expression and consequence of the existence of 
disorder or disease in some part of that system, and that that principle of healing is alone truly rational or scientific 
which, in order to remove morbid phenomena in any part of the organism, prescribes a method of treatment 
capable of operating as directly as possible on the nervous centres themselves, and thus of uprooting and re- 
moving from any part of them the immediate cause of those phenomena. 

(7.) To exhibit an experimental verification of the pathological, etiological, and therapeutical principles which 
the work expounds— a verification consisting of 100 accurately reported cases (in each of which pain or sensory 
disorder was a prominent feature), proving that not only pain, but diseases of various kinds, and located in any 
part of the bodily periphery, can be most surely and most effectually remedied through the agency of the nervous 
centres themselves by a modification of their vital activity, and that this modification can be easily and comfortably 
produced, without the aid of drugs, by the practical application of the doctrines and method which collectively I 
have found it expedient to designate Neuro-Dynamic Medicine." — Extract from the Preface. 



LONDON : J. & A. CHURCHILL, NEW BURLINGTON STREET. 



Works hy Dr, Chapman^ already published. 



SEA SICKNESS, AND HOW TO PREVENT IT: 

An Explanation of its Nature and Successful Treatment through the 

Agency of the Nervous System, by means of the Spinal lee-bag. 

With an Introduction on 

The General Principles of Neuro- Therapeutics. 

Second Edition, in 8vo, price 2s. 6d. 



[The work contains reports of about Forty Cases, provinsf that Sea-Sickness is both preventable and curable by 
means of the Spinal Ice-bag. Its application is agreeable (See pages 8, 9, and 10 of this Circular; it gives imme- 
diate comfort and relief; while arresting the sickness, as well as any cramps or spasms which may be experienced, 
it restores the impaired circulation of the blood to its normal standard ; and thus the patient, who may be cold, 
pallid, apathetic, and completely prostrate, quickly regains the ruddy glow and the mental and physical energy of 
health.] 

" Certainly, so far as the history of these voyages across the Channel goes, it is highly in favour of the author's 
ingenious recommendations. . . . We advise, both for practical and theoretical purposes, that the pages of 
his pamphlet be carefully perused." — Lancet, March 4, 1865. 

" I had some difficulty in persuading passengers to try it (the spinal ice-bag), but those who did were ben&. 
fited," — Capt, White, Commander of one of the Newhaven and Dieppe boats, 

"In severe cases where other remedies have failed, I have very generally found it (the spinal ice-bag) do great 
good. I have applied it to young children, delicate women, and old people. In no case does it do harm ; but in 
the great majority of instances it soothes the nervous irritability which so commonly accompanies sea-sickness, 

induces sleep, and so enables the stomach to receive light food, aad consequently relieves exhaustion I 

order it to be kept on a couple of hours; though, if the patient sleeps, as is often the case, I never remove it until 
after waking." — Letter ofS. M. Bradley, Surgeoyi, Cunard Service, in the "Lancet," December 3, 1864. 

"The following is an extract from a letter addressed to me, June 3rd, 1865, by Dr. Hayle, of Rochdale : — 'I re- 
commended a patient about to cross the Atlantic to try one of your ice-bags for sea-sickness. The result was most 
satisfactory. He was never sick when wearing the ice-bag. Once he went without it, and then, and then only, was 
he sick.'" 

" In the latter part of 1865, Mrs. Charles Darwin wrote to me, that her son had recently experienced the benefit 
of the spinal ice-bag, while passing from Holyhead to Ireland ' on a rough morning.' She said, ' He is very subject 
to sea-sickness, and is convinced that, without the ice, he would, uu this occasion, have been very bad. He put on 
the bag soon after starting, when already disordered, and at once felt relief." — " Diarrhoea and Cholera." By 
John Chapman, M.D. Second edition, p. 132. 

" If Dr. Chapman has proposed to us a means of alleviating, witli almost perfect certainty, that most distressing 
malady, sea-sickness, we are criminally neglectful if we refuse to employ it. . . . The case (in question) is as 
conclusive as a single case can be, in regard to the great practical value of his discovery. . . . The effects of 
the application of the ice-bag were little short of miraculous. In three minutes the retching ceased and the spasms 
were calmed. In a quarter of an hour she (the patient) had fallen into a quiet sleep ; and in half an hour her hands 
and feet were of natural warmth, and her face had regained its wonted colour. In two hours she awoke, greatly 
refreshed, and from that time did not miss a single meal. I can see no reason why the process may not be 
successfully extended over twelve days as well as four (the treatment was continued during the whole voyage — a 
rough one, lasting four days and a half — with complete success), with proper care and management." — Report of 
" Case of Sea-Sickness successfully treated by Ice to the Spine." — By B. Lee, M.D., in the Philadelphia Medical and 
Surgical Reporter. 

"Among the thousand and one remedies that have been proposed for sea-sickness, there is one which, in a 
scientific point of view, towers above them all. . . . We are not accustomed to devote our leading columns to 
the advocacy of any therapeutical system, but we feel it due to a most able physiologist to testify to the necessity 
of submitting his conclusions to the test of experience. In a short time sufficient facts may be accumulated to con- 
firm the only scientific theory [of Sea-sickness] which has been put forward ; a theory, be it remembered, of 
the utmost significance in reference to other more important diseases, and which has been applied by its author to 
an elucidation of the pathology of Cholera, Epilepsy, Paralysis, and other equally diverse conditions. ... It 
would seem from numerous instances, that, properly applied, the ice is not only safe, but positively pleasant. 
Moreover, the soothing effect is so general, that sound and refreshing sleep is frequently induced, so that we con- 
stantly read of patients — men, women, or Uttle children — faUing asleep on the ice-bag, and waking up refreshed 
and hungry." — Medicctl Press and Circular, June, 1867. 



LONDON : TRUBNEH & CO., 60, PATERNOSTER ROW, E.G. 



4 Works by Dr. Chapman^ already published. 

DIARRHCEA & CHOLERA : 

Their Nature^ Origin., and Successful Treatment through the 
Agency of the Nervous System. 

Second Edition, Enlarged, 8vo, cloth, price 7s. 6d. 



'•This is a remarkable book, and worthy the serious attention of every one of our 

readers It contains a speculation which exhibits the essential features of a 

well-constructed theory Dr. Chapman's remarkably ingenious theoi-y of cholera 

is in harmony with the results of the most recent physiological investigations; it is 
clearly put, happily illustrated, logically argued It is only by a cJose examina- 
tion of the detailed application of the hypothesis as a means of rendering intelligible 
the proximate cause of every special symptom, that a comprehensive conception of the 
hypothesis becomes possible Each receives a consistent and intelligible expla- 
nation. .... The strength of the .theory lies in its comprehensive and simple expla- 
nation of seemingly contradictoi-y phenomena, by the application of a recognised general 
truth The chapter on the causes of cholera displays great originality and in- 
genuity in reconciling and explaining the various modes of action of causative agencies, 
and a singularly happy power of using his knowledge for the setting forth of new 
analogies, and the bringing together apparently the most contradictory phenomena for the 
support of a general law." — Medical Times and Gazette, Nov. 3rd, 1866. 

" Dr. Chapman's doctrines appear to be the natural deductions from the experiments of 
Claude Bernard, Brown -S^quard, and other renowned physiologists. In fact, where 

those authorities stop. Dr. Chapman begins We are bound to say that we see 

no flaw in his logic, and we believe that those who accept his premises will find no escape 
from his conclusions. His volume is one elaborate and consistent argument — a complete 
work which we commend to the serious consideration of the profession." — Medical Press 
and Circular, Oct. 9th, 1867. 

" Dr. Chapman applies his well-known views of thepathology of disease, and of its treat- 
ment, through the agency of the nervous system, with wonderful ingenuity to explain ail 

the phenomena of cholera Apart from all peculiarities of theory on the author's 

part, the present work will be found to contain a clear and complete account of what is 
known of cholera, and an acute and instraetive criticism of the theories of its nature, 
which have been propounded by different writers."— JowniaZ of Mental Science, Jan. 1867. 
" Whatever amount of truth Dr. Chapman's hypothesis may possess, his view is woi-ked 
out with a display of logical reasoning, formidable facts, and erudition, such as is seldom 

met with in medical essays Of the hundred and one treatises on cholera which 

have been published during the past year, .Dr. Chapman's is at mice the most interesting, 
the most scientific, and the most scholarly." — The Popular Science Revieio, January, 1867. 
Edited by Henry Lawson, M.D. 

" The section criticizing Dr. George Johnson's castor-oil treatment and lung-capillary 
theory is very ingenious.' -^/ndiVra Medical Gazette, January, 1867. 

" In conclusion, we feel bound to say that Dr. Chapman's hypothesis embodies a great 
amount of novel truth ; that it is ingenious, well reasoned, admirably supported, and not 
only in harmony with, but in advance of, the results of the highest investigations of the 
time. The subject is treated witlr real perspicuity and candour, and with a remarkable 
desire to appreciate every fact at its true value ; and the work, as a whole, lacks nothing 
that is needed to make it a rare specimen of the application of the severest logic, and the 
most precise manipulation of language to practical science. Indeed, the book is chai-ac- 
terized not only by great ability, by originality of thought, by judicial acumen, and by 
familiarity with the spirit and tendencies of modern research, but also by a rare power of 
reconciling' apparently contradictory phenomena, and marshalling them together for the 
support of a common purpose." — The Medical Mirror, March, 1867. 

" The apparent positive results obtained by the application of the ice-bag in collapse 
have been the promotion of a more steady reaction and the relief of cramps. One or two 
of the cases recorded seem to leave little doubt in these respects, and these facta command 
attention." — Half-yearly Abstract of the Medical Sciences, vol. xliv. 



LONDON: TKUBNER & CO., 60, PATEKNOSTER EOW, E.C. 



Works by Dr. Chapman, already published. 5 

CASES OF DIAEBH(EA ANB CHOLEEA 

TREATED SUCCESSFULLY THROUGH THE AGENCY OF THE 
NERVOUS SYSTEM, CHIEFLY BY MEANS OF THE 

SPINAL ICE-BAG. 

8vo, 64 pp., price Is. 



"_. . . . Theauthor having proposed his method of treatment, has in the next place to determine its actual 
value in practice; he according'ly completes his case by bringing' forward a large body of evidence to show that his 
method, when carried out by attendants with the minute care he has a right to enjoin upon them, is, if not uniformly 
at any rate very largely successful. .... We must say that his statements are backed hv oery_ strong evidence 
used with much knowledge and skill — so much so, indeed, that they cannot he overlooked, hut claim our instant attention. 
. . . fVe cannot but be pleased to think that the evidence is most stro)ig in support of that one positio7iin whichti-e are 
most immediately inter ested— namely , that the ice treatment is successful. This surely is the main point, and in the face 
of the miserable results obtained under the use of other methods, we cannot but form a favourable estimate of the 

alternative treatment here proposed And although we fortunately have no experience of cholera thus 

treated, yet in fairness to Dr. Chapman, we ought to say that we have found the ice-bag very useful in some other 
disorders. For example, we have found it strikingly successful in maniacal conditions, when applied to the cervical 
region; in sympathetic vomiting likewise, and in some other conditions too numerous now to mention."— Medical 
Times end Gazette, Feb. 17, 1872. 

" Dr. Chapman has the undoubted merit of originating a system of treatment which we believe is of great 
practical value. We are satisfied of the truth of his assertion, that the condition of the viscera of the thorax and 
abdomen can be modified to a considerable extent by the external application of heat and cold to the spme We 
have ourselves observed the advantages of Dr. Chapman's method of treatment in sea-sickness. In the stages ot 
bronchitis where the breathing is dry and tubular. Dr. Chapman's hot-water bag often causes marked relief, and 
the increased secretion of mucus from the bronchial tubes seems to be proved by the greater softness of the 

breathing which may be ascertained to follow in a few minutes by auscultation The pamphlet is m a 

readable form, and s"hows both great scientific knowledge and practical sagacity."— If eiicaZ Fress and Ctrciolar. 

" A readable and persuasive pamphlet. We should like to see Dr. Chapman's views fidly tested,"— Edinburgh 
Medical Journal, July, 1872. 

LOI^DOIT: BAILLIERB, TINDALL, AND COX, 
20, KING WILLIAM STUEET, STKAND. 



M)i M^t hiring CjjilbHrtlj. 



[Eeprinted, with additions, from the Westminster Review for January y 1859.] 
8vo, price Is, 



" The special object of the Westminster reviewer is to combat the prejudices, religious as well as physiological, 
which still exists against the use of anaesthetics in parturition." — The Press. 

"A searching article, very useful to confirm and guide the wavering." — S^ee^aior. 

" Exhibits very strikingly how in this, as in many other cases, mankind had been from time to time on the very 
verge of beneficent discovery without accomplishing the last step into the light."— The Scotsman. 

"In the article on anassthetic medicines, the discovery, the virtues, the progress, the position, and moral effects 
of Chloroform and other similar matters are treated in full detail. The article, in fact, very nearly exhausts the 
subject. The question'rof the effect on the cerebral and nervous systems is treated at once medically and popularly 
and made much more intelligable than hi any other essay we have met with which attempts to enter into technical 
details." — Morning Chronicle. 

"Treats the history of ansesthetieal agents in a very interesting manner, the whole concluding with an able 
reply to the many objections wliich have been urged against the practice of anaesthesia during childbirth." — Tork 
Herald. _ j. ii, . 

" The writer'first'gives~an historical account of the use of auEesthetie agents — notices objections to their 
employment, and defends tlieir use in a calm moderate, scientific manner." — Bradford Meview. 

" In the article on Chloroform, we learn how extensively this blessed substance has already entered into medical 
and surgical practice, and how vehemently it has been opposed by those whom Dr. Chalmers called 'small 
theologians ' on the ground that it was contrary to Scripture, especially in cases of midwifery."— jBrad/orrf Observer 



LONDON: TEiJBNER AND CO., 60, PATERNOSTER ROW. 



6 Works by Dr. Chapman^ already published. 

The Medical Institutions of the United Kingdom: A History exempli- 
fying the Eyils of Over-Legislation . 8vo, cloth, price 2s. 6d. 

LONDON : J. & A, CHURCHILL, NEW BURLINGTON STREET. 



Medical Patents : A Letter on the Patenting of Inventions in con- 
nexion with Medicine. 8vo, price 6d. 

Dr. Chapman is at war with the faculty on a point of etiqaette, or, as those who consider the question a 
grave one would say, a point of ethics. ... Of course the traditions of the faculty, the spirit of con- 
Ber\ati m, and so forth, all tend to oppose the patenting of medical instruments; but beyond these motives of 
prejudice we see no logical objection to the practice. ... It certainly appears hard and unfair that the 
Iruit of a man's brains should fall into the hands of a trader— as in the case of Dr. Richardson's M«patented 
bpray-producer— and that the original inventor should only be rewarded with barren honour. It seems to us, 
therefore, that Dr. Chapman's arguments are in the main perfectly reasonable ; and we cannot but think that 
the medical journals have displayed a feeling quite out of accordance with the true spirit of the press in re- 
lusing insertion to Dr. Chapman's l&it&T."— London Review, Nov. 2nd, 1867. 

Christian Revivals i their History and Natural History. 8vo, 

price Is. 

Prostitution in Eolation to the National Health. See the Second 

Edition of the Westminster Review (New Series), No. LXXI., for July, 1869. Price 6s. 

" A detailed, and, on the whole, able exposition of the subject of prostitution and its results. 
It lays open to its readers the stores of information which modern research has accumulated 
on this disheartening topic. * * * The review in question is not only an able one — it is a 
thoroughly earnest one. There is no pandering to vicious taste in it, no indulgence in the flippancy 
of expression which so often marks disquisitions of this kind. It is in sober earnest. He admits to 
some extent the impropriety, but justifies himself by the assertion that the plan which he has taken 
is the only ef&cient one. 

'Thus,' he writes, 'the social malady which we now purpose to discuss is vitally interesting to 
women — it affects her both as a wife aud as a mother ; and, while destroying the health of herself 
and of the dearest objects of her affections, too often blights those affections themselves. Suffering 
as she does from its effects, shall she be restrained by conventional prohibitions, or even by her own 
sensitive delicacy, from manifesting her interest in it, from exerting her influence at once to repress 
It and to remove its causes, or from labouring in every possible way to place herself and those related 
to her out uf danger ? on the contrary, we believe that this is specially one of those subjects which it 
is her solemn duty to examine for h&x&Q\V— British Medical Journal, Oct. 23, 1869. 

Prostitution: Governmental Experiments in Controlling it- Re- 
printed from the Westminster Review (New Series), No. LXXIII., for January, 1870. 
Price Is. 

The elaborate nature of the arguments adduced, the earnest tone of the article, and its religious 
seriousness of purpose, all contribute to render this the most telling attack which the Contagious 
Diseases Acts and the whole system of State control of prostitution has, in our opinion, ever 
received."— y/ie Medical Press and Circular, Feb. 2, 1870. 

'' The article is ably written, and altogether is one which deserves to be read and pondered over 
at a time when extended efforts at the control of prostitution by the State are in contemplation." — 
Medical Times and Gazette, Jan. 15, 1870. 

' We believe that every thinker who desires a clear view of the whole question in its breadth 
and complicated relations has the proper material before him in the view here given of what the 
* Government experiments,' have resulted in." — Western Daily Press, Jan. 26, 1870. 

Prostitution : How to deal with it. See the "Westminster Review" 

(New Series), No. LXXIV., for April, 1870. Piice 6s. 

Prostitution in Paris: Dr. Chapman^s Replies to the Remarks of 

M. Le Fort and Mr. Berkeley Hill, on certain passages in the articles on Prostitution published 
in the Westminster Review. 8vo, price M. 



LONDON : TIIUBNER & CO., 60, PATEKNOSTER EOW. 



DR. CHAPMAN'S SPINE-BAGS (PATENT), 



DESIGNED FOR THE PRACTICAL APPLICATION OF THE PRINCIPLES 
OF NEDRO-DYNAMIC MEDICINE. 

THE SPINAL ICE-BAGS vary in breadth from two to four inches and a 
quarter, the shortest bag being the narrowest, and the longest the broadest. 
Their lengths are as follows :— 




8 inch ) 



> suitable for children. 
) 

( suitable for youth of 
( both sexes. 

suitable for women. 

suitable for men. 



SPINAL ICE-BAG. 



Lumbar Ice-Bag, 10 inches 
long. 

The Spinal Water-Bags are 
in respect to size as fol- 
lows : 

„ . , J suitable for youth of 
} both sexes. 

10 „ { suitable for adults of 
12 „ t both sexes. 
14 „ j 




SPINAL WATER' 



THE SPINAL ICE-BAG is divided into cells, generally three. By this 
arrangement the ice, being prevented from falling from the upper parts, to the 
bottom of the bag, can be kept in apposition with the whole or any special part of 
the spine, even though the patient should be upright, or should walk about. The 
mouths of all the cells are so effectively closed by means of a clamp that no 
water can escape, even though the whole of the ice be melted. 

The bags are sold by the following Agents : — 

London : C. MACKINTOSH & CO., the Manufacturers, 83, Cannon Street, E.C. 

S. MAW, SON, & THOMPSON, 11, Aldersgate Street, E.C, 

JOHN G. GOULD, 198, Oxford Street, W. 
Glasgow : THOMAS CHAPMAN, 56, Buchanan Street. 
Philadelphia : J. MARDON WILSON, Jun. 
Calcutta : WYMAN & COMPANY, 1, Hare Street. 

AND MAT BE HAD BY ORDER OF ALL DRUGGISTS. 

A pamphlet containing directions how to select a suitable bag in each case, 
and how to fill and apply it, as well as other information concerning its use is 
supplied, gratis, by the agents.